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DaveBM
Jul 19th, 2005, 03:17 AM
Hi,

Since using my PC I've always found it very tricky to remove #80 once applied.

Im using Megs terry towels but it takes me a couple of passes to 'mop up' then lots of rubbing to remove the rest.

Is this normal?

I use quite a lot of the product but understand this is what you are meant to do with polish???

Thanks

Dave

Tim Lingor
Jul 19th, 2005, 03:26 AM
Hi Dave,

If you are having difficulty removing #80, one of three things is probably happening:

1. too much product is being used
2. not being buffed long enough
3. the buffing pad is over-saturated with product


For the amount of product, I will use a light ring of product around the pad. That is enough to complete a 2'x2' area. Work the product until it is a light residue. This may take 2-4 minutes depending on humidity per given area. Finally, once the pad becomes over saturated with product, you will need to either clean the pad or switch to a clean one.

Also, make sure you are working on a cool surface. Plus, really shake the bottle at the start and periodically throughout the detail.

The above should take of the problem! :xyxthumbs

Tim

dnoraker
Jul 19th, 2005, 03:27 AM
I've never had that problem, even when I first started with it. You probably are just using too much. A couple swipes with a terry and a final wipe with a MF and it should be gone....assuming you aren't in the sun, that is. :)

DaveBM
Jul 19th, 2005, 03:35 AM
Ah, Ive been using LOADS of product. :wall:

Could that also be why im removing the main swirls but end up with very fine cob-web style swirls?

TKDDAD
Jul 19th, 2005, 03:41 AM
Originally posted by 2hotford
Hi Dave,

If you are having difficulty removing #80, one of three things is probably happening:

1. too much product is being used
2. not being buffed long enough
3. the buffing pad is over-saturated with product


For the amount of product, I will use a light ring of product around the pad. That is enough to complete a 2'x2' area. Work the product until it is a light residue. This may take 2-4 minutes depending on humidity per given area. Finally, once the pad becomes over saturated with product, you will need to either clean the pad or switch to a clean one.

Also, make sure you are working on a cool surface. Plus, really shake the bottle at the start and periodically throughout the detail.

The above should take of the problem! :xyxthumbs

Tim

Great advice Tim...2-4 minutes seems like a short time but when you're actually buffing, it's a long time...I don't think I actually am buffing long enough based on your advice and will have to time myself next time...thanks !

gb387
Jul 19th, 2005, 06:28 PM
You should end up with a semi-transparent look to the product when you are done... you are right TKDDAD, 2-4 min sure seems like a long time when buffing, I have a clock in the garage and keep and time is I like to stick closer to the 2 min mark.

Tim Lingor
Jul 19th, 2005, 07:02 PM
Originally posted by gb387
You should end up with a semi-transparent look to the product when you are done... you are right TKDDAD, 2-4 min sure seems like a long time when buffing, I have a clock in the garage and keep and time is I like to stick closer to the 2 min mark.

Hey,

I should have added that this with the assumption that the PC is set to speed 5, with medium downard pressure and slow arm movement with a W-8006 Polishing Pad. The times also depends on the relative humidity, the amount of product on the pad and the size of area being completed. All of the above must be factored in. That is why when people ask how long to buff a product, we have to give an approximation only.

One time a member asked me how long before #83 DACP broke down with the PC set to speed 5. I went outside a few minutes later and timed it. In my case, it was between 3-5 minutes for the amount of product etc I was using.

With the rotary, it is a fraction of this time! I use the rotary the majority of the time; and ~98% of the time I use #83 with the rotary.

One thing for sure, the PC takes a lot longer to break down the product. Meg's #80 has a lot of "wet" time which makes it ideal for someone learning with the rotary. But this wet time does add to the amount of time to break it down with the PC. The key is buff it until it is a very light residue, but not a dry buff. Hence it is better to work the product to this point rather than trying to time it. In time, you will develop a feel for when a product is broken down and will know when it is time to stop buffing. :)

Tim

rusty bumper
Jul 19th, 2005, 07:49 PM
Sometimes I wonder if I'm applying too much of #80. My ring size on the pad is about 3/16" of an inch more or less. When I buff it with the PC (5 speed setting), I work it in a good 2 or 3 minutes, but the product doesn't have a simi-transparent look to it. It's sort of to the point of being almost tackey, and this is when I remove it.

But I've had no removal problems to speak of, other than the fact that it takes a few wipes with a terry towel in order to remove it.

DaveBM
Jul 19th, 2005, 09:34 PM
Another thing is I dont usually go higher than 4 becasue if ive already done a few areas all the product left over in the pad seems to get forced down onto the paint. Again this is probably all to do with me using too much.

This might be a silly question but is there actually any difference in polishing at 4 instead of 5, or is it just a matter of it takes a bit longer to break down?

rusty bumper
Jul 20th, 2005, 05:16 AM
Originally posted by DaveBM
This might be a silly question but is there actually any difference in polishing at 4 instead of 5, or is it just a matter of it takes a bit longer to break down?
There is a big difference in cleaning power when using the 5 setting. Meguiars recommended the 4 1/2 setting when I saw the video for the first time, but after a lot of experimenting, I found that the best results possible were achieved with the 5 setting.


Here's (http://www.meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=7034&highlight=bathroom) a great thread that explains the proper use of the G-100 in greater detail......There is also a section on #80 too.