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BJClarke001
Aug 11th, 2005, 10:33 AM
I thought about what was the best place to post this and concluded it should go here since it is related to Using the "DA" and "taking out swirls" from the paint.

BTW: I don't have a DA (Yet) but my B-Day is coming up and I drop hints almost daily to my family for the last month. I will be pretty hacked off if I get a Tie for a present. LOL.

So, my plan is to practice using the DA in my garage. I have some neighbors whom have "Winter Cars" for me to practice on. And in doing so, what garage lighting is best for seeing most of the swirls in the paint and what is the best placement of these lights for working on the hood and on the fenders/doors and so on? I ask because it seems to be counter productive to polish in the garage and then have to pull it out in the sun to see if your doing a good job. Besides, I may want to do it on cloudy days or at night.

I know Sun Light is the best method, but what is second best?

BTW again: I have a Two-Car Garage with 10 foot ceilings, just in case someone wanted to know. And, I do my own electrical installation work too, so mounting stuff on the wall/ceiling is not an issue. Expensive lighting may be something that stops me but lets see what comes of this thread.

rusty bumper
Aug 11th, 2005, 06:46 PM
I'm no lighting expert, but maybe a lot of 4' fluorescent tubes would be in order?

Maybe something like a "daylight" bulb would be the closest thing to real daylight?

I have seen some of the guys use the portable halogen lights on a tripod, in order to see the sides of a car in a garage.

Hope I helped some.

BJClarke001
Aug 12th, 2005, 02:51 AM
Rusty,

Anything helps IMO.

I think you posted a Thread in the Break Room section talking about a site you came across;

garagejunkies.net

I went there this morning and there is alot of stuff there on the very subject.

Thanks for taking the time to respond.

Brad

rusty bumper
Aug 12th, 2005, 05:16 AM
Originally posted by BJClarke001
Rusty,

Anything helps IMO.

I think you posted a Thread in the Break Room section talking about a site you came across;

garagejunkies.net

I went there this morning and there is alot of stuff there on the very subject.

Thanks for taking the time to respond.

Brad
You're welcome Brad. :)

Good thing I ran into that site. ;)

TKDDAD
Aug 12th, 2005, 06:38 AM
Originally posted by BJClarke001
I thought about what was the best place to post this and concluded it should go here since it is related to Using the "DA" and "taking out swirls" from the paint.

BTW: I don't have a DA (Yet) but my B-Day is coming up and I drop hints almost daily to my family for the last month. I will be pretty hacked off if I get a Tie for a present. LOL.

So, my plan is to practice using the DA in my garage. I have some neighbors whom have "Winter Cars" for me to practice on. And in doing so, what garage lighting is best for seeing most of the swirls in the paint and what is the best placement of these lights for working on the hood and on the fenders/doors and so on? I ask because it seems to be counter productive to polish in the garage and then have to pull it out in the sun to see if your doing a good job. Besides, I may want to do it on cloudy days or at night.

I know Sun Light is the best method, but what is second best?

BTW again: I have a Two-Car Garage with 10 foot ceilings, just in case someone wanted to know. And, I do my own electrical installation work too, so mounting stuff on the wall/ceiling is not an issue. Expensive lighting may be something that stops me but lets see what comes of this thread.

Brad, I have 3 lights in my two car garage, two 4' fluorescent and one 150 watt incandesent....to me, it's still not enough....I wax my cars in the garage since there's no shade (and it's too dark at 5:00 a.m. ;) )....I'm going to add two more fluorescent lights and evenly space them....the problem I have is getting enough light on the sides of the car....good luck !!

BJClarke001
Aug 12th, 2005, 07:28 AM
Originally posted by TKDDAD
Brad, I have 3 lights in my two car garage, two 4' fluorescent and one 150 watt incandesent....to me, it's still not enough....I wax my cars in the garage since there's no shade (and it's too dark at 5:00 a.m. ;) )....I'm going to add two more fluorescent lights and evenly space them....the problem I have is getting enough light on the sides of the car....good luck !!

TKDDAD,

Yeah, my normal reaction thoughts would be to do it just as you have in your garage. Can you see swirls somewhat?
I was thinking putting the 2 fluorescents on the ceiling and maybe 1 on the walls, on either side of where the vehicle sits. Thinking though to mount it on the walls near the ceiling cuz if it is too low, you would block it standing there causing shadows.

I have a new home and no (big) trees for shade to hide under. I wash and wax in the garage all the time. This has double advantages to it because the kids don't track in so much dust into the house because the garage floor is getting washed/rinsed from the car washing at leat twice a week.

After cracking this nut on the lighting, I am moving to heating to keep the vehicles clean in the dead of winter too.

BTW: I see your in Buffalo, NY. I am originally from Rochester, NY. Born and raised there all my life and moved to Easton, PA, 4 years ago. Still have family up there still too.

karll
Aug 12th, 2005, 08:13 AM
I just did 'lighting' in my two car garage.
I ended up using six 4 foot flourescent fixtures. I got the better quality, workshop,low temp ones. ( a bit more money).

I also used T8 tubes that were "daylight" temperature...actually they are same light temperature as high noon sun.

I like the warmer look with these tubes as opposed to the unnatural bluey look of the normal flourescents.

and i'm very pleased with result and get lotsa comments!!

cheers.

TKDDAD
Aug 12th, 2005, 08:26 AM
Originally posted by BJClarke001
TKDDAD,

Yeah, my normal reaction thoughts would be to do it just as you have in your garage. Can you see swirls somewhat?
I was thinking putting the 2 fluorescents on the ceiling and maybe 1 on the walls, on either side of where the vehicle sits. Thinking though to mount it on the walls near the ceiling cuz if it is too low, you would block it standing there causing shadows.

I have a new home and no (big) trees for shade to hide under. I wash and wax in the garage all the time. This has double advantages to it because the kids don't track in so much dust into the house because the garage floor is getting washed/rinsed from the car washing at leat twice a week.

After cracking this nut on the lighting, I am moving to heating to keep the vehicles clean in the dead of winter too.

BTW: I see your in Buffalo, NY. I am originally from Rochester, NY. Born and raised there all my life and moved to Easton, PA, 4 years ago. Still have family up there still too.

Cool :xyxthumbs Someone from my neck of the woods !...can I see swirls ?...absolutely, but only on the hood, roof and trunk lid...that's one reason I'd like more light....I too am looking into heat for the garage...what have you considered ?...

TKDDAD
Aug 12th, 2005, 08:28 AM
Originally posted by karll
I just did 'lighting' in my two car garage.
I ended up using six 4 foot flourescent fixtures. I got the better quality, workshop,low temp ones. ( a bit more money).

I also used T8 tubes that were "daylight" temperature...actually they are same light temperature as high noon sun.

I like the warmer look with these tubes as opposed to the unnatural bluey look of the normal flourescents.

and i'm very pleased with result and get lotsa comments!!

cheers.

My issue will be the two garage door openers make it difficult to mount the lights where I think they'd do the most good....:wall:
And I like the idea of the T8 tubes...would be a good upgrade...thanks for the ideas !

Accumulator
Aug 12th, 2005, 10:51 AM
I have literally dozens of 8' tubes in my shop, but I see *far* more marring if I turn them off and use the high-wattage incandescents. In my experience, cars that look perfect under fluorescents can really look marred up (or at least full of micromarring) under more harsh lighting. I see stuff under the incandescents that I don't even see under halogens. I find that to truly evaluate the paint, I have to use different lighting sources (currently using five) and multiple viewing angles. Otherwise I can have unpleasant surprises in weird situations, such as at night under certain types of lighting. And I only see holograms under natural sunlight.

Bill D
Aug 12th, 2005, 12:07 PM
Accumulator,

You taught me that and I am very thankful I got the incandescents. If you really want to challenge yourself use the multiple lighting sources at multiple angles. There's nothing like a finish that can pass the "lighting test". :bow :D

BJClarke001
Aug 15th, 2005, 03:15 AM
Originally posted by TKDDAD
Cool :xyxthumbs Someone from my neck of the woods !...can I see swirls ?...absolutely, but only on the hood, roof and trunk lid...that's one reason I'd like more light....I too am looking into heat for the garage...what have you considered ?...

TKDDAD,

I have been lookking at Natural Gas Units called Blue Flame. I think the Home Depot sells them. My neighbor put a 30,000 BTU unit in and it seems to work good. It would be great to pull the car in in the winter, let it defrost and all that dirty black snow that builds up in the wheel wells would fall right off. I just wish I had a drain in the garage floor. But, the good news is that floor was poured with a slight angle towords the Garage door. So, the water really runs out into the driveway. I suppose if I do this this winter, I will have to use a lot of Ice Melt on the water running into the driveway and freezing up. Or, let the kids go Ice Scating on it :D

BJClarke001
Aug 15th, 2005, 03:20 AM
Originally posted by Accumulator
I have literally dozens of 8' tubes in my shop, but I see *far* more marring if I turn them off and use the high-wattage incandescents. In my experience, cars that look perfect under fluorescents can really look marred up (or at least full of micromarring) under more harsh lighting. I see stuff under the incandescents that I don't even see under halogens. I find that to truly evaluate the paint, I have to use different lighting sources (currently using five) and multiple viewing angles. Otherwise I can have unpleasant surprises in weird situations, such as at night under certain types of lighting. And I only see holograms under natural sunlight.

Accumulator,

Thanks for that info. and it really helped.

High Wattage incandescents (Floods) are something I did not think of (gotta think outsie the box sometimes :D ).

TKDDAD
Aug 15th, 2005, 04:00 AM
Originally posted by BJClarke001
TKDDAD,

I have been lookking at Natural Gas Units called Blue Flame. I think the Home Depot sells them. My neighbor put a 30,000 BTU unit in and it seems to work good. It would be great to pull the car in in the winter, let it defrost and all that dirty black snow that builds up in the wheel wells would fall right off. I just wish I had a drain in the garage floor. But, the good news is that floor was poured with a slight angle towords the Garage door. So, the water really runs out into the driveway. I suppose if I do this this winter, I will have to use a lot of Ice Melt on the water running into the driveway and freezing up. Or, let the kids go Ice Scating on it :D

Thanks BJClarke001.....I also do not have a floor drain but when I get the floor repoured someday I will have a drain installed...until then, the only option is deal with the run off as you suggested using an ice melt product...

TKDDAD
Aug 15th, 2005, 04:01 AM
Originally posted by BJClarke001
Accumulator,

Thanks for that info. and it really helped.

High Wattage incandescents (Floods) are something I did not think of (gotta think outsie the box sometimes :D ).

Don't the high watt floods use a lot more electricity that the T8 flourecents ?...I'd have to install more outlets to use the floods...do any of you have pictures of your garage lighting that you might share so I could get some idea of how you set it up ?...

RDVT4ME
Aug 15th, 2005, 04:38 AM
I have some portable halogen lights. 2 units on one stand that can be raised and lowered. Total watts is 1200. The wattage is adjustable....300, 600, 900, 1200. There are 2 bulbs in each unit. Each bulb is 300 watts. This works very well for me. It's shows lots of scratches that you may not see in other light.

TKDDAD
Aug 15th, 2005, 05:13 AM
Originally posted by RDVT4ME
I have some portable halogen lights. 2 units on one stand that can be raised and lowered. Total watts is 1200. The wattage is adjustable....300, 600, 900, 1200. There are 2 bulbs in each unit. Each bulb is 300 watts. This works very well for me. It's shows lots of scratches that you may not see in other lignt.

Ahhhh...portable lights....never thought of that :wall: thanks !

BJClarke001
Aug 15th, 2005, 05:44 AM
Well, I think that maybe that is the best solution. I plan on using the T8 tubes that are"daylight" temperature for the everyday stuff. Then, I may add the floods portable stand for when I plan on needing additional lighting for the buff/polish work. After all, I am not even that far yet on even having a (DA) buffer, LOL. But I do like planing ahead. Must be the Engineer in me.

Accumulator
Aug 15th, 2005, 08:20 AM
Sorry, I don't have pics of my shop. Wish I did as I'd sorta like to show it off :D

I'm not using floodlights, but rather industrial-style ceiling mount light fixtures that take "regular" lightbulbs, just hight-wattage ones that look normal but big (they also make these in "mogul base" versions and I sorta wish I'd got those instead). Sheesh, I can't even tell you what kind of fixtures they are as the contractor didn't leave me the info :rolleyes: But they have metal shades and wire grills to protect the bulbs. They look like something you'd see in a 1940's warehouse. I use 320-watt bulbs in them and have three hanging over each side/"bay" in the shop with two more in the center of the shop over the trench drain (total of 8 of these things). Sometimes I spot stuff the best by turning on the ones on the other side of the shop instead of the ones right over where I'm working. It's funny how the different angles of illumination and viewing angles work.

I also use a portable trouble-light that has a spring clamp instead of a handle. It's rated to over 300W and I usually use 300W bulbs in it (but IIRC Bill D sometimes uses 200W bulbs in his). I hold it by the spring clamp and move it around while also varying my viewing angle. Suddenly some previously invisible marring will just jump out at me when I get everything right. I keep a little polish on my one finger and dab it on the spot so I don't forget where it is while getting the polisher.

I also have two of the two-head halogens and yeah, they're great (if a little warm sometimes). But for the final inspection, I turn off everything and use the incandescents. Somehow I just don't see as much of the super-fine stuff under the halogens.

Oh, and if you can, put some of the fluorescent tubes on the walls. Great for general illumination.

Oh #2, watch getting cold water on hot halogen/incandescent bulbs ;) That's one good reason to have a lot of fluorescents.

RDVT4ME
Aug 15th, 2005, 09:42 AM
You are definitely right on the heat generated by the halogens. I bought a nice fan for the garage to help with that.

Dragpakmach
Aug 25th, 2005, 08:30 AM
I have my halogens mounted to the walls to prevent anybody knocking them over on a car.The light is excellent but the heat from them is terrible except in the winter.Then I have a halogen clipped to my moble cart for them low areas.I havent tried the incondesent lights yet.