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Mike Phillips
Feb 5th, 2006, 08:44 AM
Dedicated thread just for questions about so-called paint protection plans and products

There seems to be enough companies in the world continually trying to sell innocent people some type of paint protectant, or paint protection plan that typically costs lots of money and offers nothing more than what the average person can already do for themselves using products available off the shelf or over the Internet without the exuberant costs.


So to warehouse all of these questions about all of these products that continue to spring-up around the world, we have created a special forum just for them.

As I find older questions already posted about products like these, or if any of you find them, send me the link to the forum thread and I'll move it into here as a clearing house for answers on this topic.

Thanks!

Marvinj
Feb 23rd, 2006, 03:10 PM
Toyota's Toyoguard..any idea what this stuff is??? $19 a bottle is kinda pricey....

Mike Phillips
Feb 23rd, 2006, 03:15 PM
Originally posted by Marvinj
Toyota's Toyoguard..any idea what this stuff is??? $19 a bottle is kinda pricey....

Never heard of it before, as far as paint sealants go, $19.00 is on the low-end.

Marvinj
Feb 23rd, 2006, 03:22 PM
it comes with new toyotas, the original package is $700 but youre suppose to use this stuff that comes with the vehicle every couple of weeks or so, I think its some type of cleaner or something....not sure what it is, thought maybe someone would know.:)

Mike Phillips
Feb 23rd, 2006, 03:36 PM
Any of these paint protection plans are basically a type of insurance policy that if you follow the rules there's some type of guarantee that the vehicle will be re-painted should the paint fail.

Because modern clear coat finishes are so durable, in most cases a factory finish with minimal upkeep will last a long time.

Note, don't confuse the above to mean that a clear coat finish will look good a long time, because that's certainly not true. You can swirls and scratch the heck out of a clear coat finish and it will look horrible but it will still last a long time.

In the big picture of life, here's what it comes down to. If you want you paint to always look good, then you need to find something you like to use and looks good in your eyes after you've applied and removed the product and then use it often.

If you do this, your car's paint will always look good. It's only when you neglect your paint for an extended period of time that it will go down hill and require lots of prep-work to remove the defects and restore the showroom new look again.

At this point you're back into the cycle, either find something you like and use it often enough to maintain your car's finish to your expectation in the environment you expose the vehicle to, or let it go and deal with it (or not), after it goes bad again.

See how this works?

There is no such thing as a miracle product that once applied will place an invisible force-field around your car and keep it looking new forever. Maintaining a finish requires action on you part, the only time you can have your cake and eat it too is to keep your car stored and covered and for the most part, don't use it.

sneek
Feb 23rd, 2006, 05:11 PM
http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=10516
http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=10895\
http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=9258

X3M Corsa Freak
Apr 29th, 2006, 09:48 AM
I don't know if this is exactly what you mean, but my dad had his new bike done with swiss tech.....
I don't have the link to the swiss tech site, but it is comparable (?) with Protech
http://www.protech.nl/

Greetings, Stefan Maanders

MaximusZTS
Aug 16th, 2006, 01:16 PM
I was talking to my boss about detailing his Excursion. he told me that it does not need to be detailed, EVER! he said he got some kind of ****** coating put on at the dealership when he bought it. And the stuff is suppose to last a life time. I told him that did not sound right and I would look into it for him.

Has anyone ever heard of this? Sounds to me like he got scammed.

MaximusZTS
Aug 16th, 2006, 01:55 PM
you know the coating that they put on your pans so food does not stick!

Michael Stoops
Aug 16th, 2006, 02:23 PM
Originally posted by MaximusZTS


Has anyone ever heard of this? Sounds to me like he got scammed.
You might be able to fry an egg on his truck and it won't stick, but you will get swirls in the finish. Oh, and unless dirt literally falls off when he goes over bumps and stuff, then I'd say he got scammed. Non-stick coating? Bah!!! If he's had the truck more than 6 months and it's been through an automatic car wash at least a dozen times, I seriously doubt there's any trace of that stuff left on the paint.

the other pc
Aug 16th, 2006, 02:42 PM
No different from any of the others, except that they add the "you know what" word to the hype.

No finish ever needs to be detailed. It will look awful and eventually fall off the car if you don't, but that doesn't mean that it needs it. ;)

Not that it's ever a good idea to make your boss look stupid but if he ever wanted to discuss the issue rationally ask him how he knows that.

The most common answer is "that's what the salesman said." Never mind that everybody in the universe knows that car salesman will say anything to "close the deal" and are absolutely notorious for being either completely clueless or liars but for some strange reason people believe this one. The dealer may well have made more money selling this "treatment" than they did on the entire rest of the car because it costs them almost nothing and they sell it for big bucks.

The reality is that there's usually a small written brochure that spells out the real claims (which are generally minimal) and either gets included in the huge stack of car buying paperwork or gets lost altogether and nobody ever reads anyway. If he manages to actually dig it out and read it he can discuss just what he was promised for real.


PC.

OPA1
Sep 5th, 2006, 06:42 PM
I'll tell you Mike. It makes me laugh when the dealers try to sell these coating jobs for the ammount they are charging. They know that not to many people are going to follow the instructions to the letter to keep the warrenty on the paint is effect. Just look at how many people are in the MEG. forums compaired to the number of vehicles on the road. If everyone was as CAR CRAZY. as the people here ALL of the care product forums around couldn't keep up. My dad said it righht a londg time ago "NOTHING LASTS FOREVER":wall:

ED:cool:

9C1 MAN
Sep 5th, 2006, 07:30 PM
carbright is a so called paint sealent that all the dealers both old and new try to push on you at 600.00 to 800.00 a pop no thanks il stick to meguiars; a proven winner............................

STG
Sep 5th, 2006, 07:38 PM
Let's not forget a very important fact about these new car dealer added guaranteed paint protectant systems.

Like Mike pointed out, modern finishes are very durable. It's no problem to warrant paint against "failure" forever to the orinial owner when:

Most cars are leased.

The average length of ownship is probably equal to the length of the loan.

farmboy
Sep 6th, 2006, 04:10 AM
Originally posted by 9C1 MAN
carbright is a so called paint sealent that all the dealers both old and new try to push on you at 600.00 to 800.00 a pop no thanks il stick to meguiars; a proven winner............................

Carbright is a company that sells dealers product. They probably have a sealant, but Carbright alone is the company.

9C1 MAN
Sep 6th, 2006, 04:46 AM
i would say your right on that mike..............

rascal
Sep 23rd, 2006, 12:37 PM
What about "Auto Butler" protectant? The dealer I bought my car from treated it before I left, but I know for a fact that it won't last forever. They said I would need to come in every six months to have it recoated to keep it effective. I told them no thanks, I use Meguiar's products on my baby and that's it. They had the nerve to put that damn sticker on the inside of my window. :mad: If that stuff is so great like they claim it is, how come my front bumper is going to need repainting due to the insect etching from the previous owner? They thought I was stupid enough to sign up for their treatment plan, but caught it before I signed the papers. They gave me a freebe treatment before I left, but I went home and rewashed my car and put on some DC 1, 2, and 3 to give it some real protection.

pcfxer
Sep 30th, 2006, 02:18 PM
In conclusion...if it does not say Meguiar's on the bottle then it isn't worth your time and money.

buda
Oct 2nd, 2006, 04:30 PM
Paint protection plans came about because the "market wanted them."

A paint sealant is somewhat different than a wax, not really all that much different as protection products go, but different.

If you want an analytical discussion of the difference between waxes and paint sealants you might want to read the article I just submitted to www.mobileworks.com on the subject.

To briefly explain. The best wax, be it natural or synthetic wax uses only what are called standard silicone fluids and at best they will last from 30 to 60 days depending on climatic conditions in the area and how the car is cared for.

Paint sealants, among other things, uses amino-functional silicones which form a cross-linking molecule when they air dry so they bond to the finish of the paint and last, NOT FOREVER, but maybe, under the best conditions up to 6 months. Under the typically normal conditions maybe only 3 to 4 months.

As Mike points out a dealer protection plan is nothing but a wax job and then insurance which is what the consumer wants. Someone to tell them they do not have to wax their car and it will be OK>

Most of these plans require a reapplication within 6 months. What does that say?

The thing that is wrong with these dealer sold protection plans is that they really do not tell the consmer the whole truth. They make them believe things that are not true.

When I sold guaranteed paint sealants all I guaranteed was that the they will have shine and protection for one year, but they have to come in for a FREE reapplication in 6 months. We sold it for $129.95.

Shine is subjective. The protection was determined by their subjective determination that the water was beading on the finish. Actually beading water is not a determinant of protection. Oil will make water bead. The ingredients in a paint sealant that provide protection, in fact, do not make water bead.

Key is truth in selling.

Bud Abraham
DETAIL PLUS SYSTEMS

gb387
Dec 13th, 2006, 05:31 AM
There seems to be enough companies in the world continually trying to sell innocent people some type of paint protectant, or paint protection plan that typically costs lots of money and offers nothing more than what the average person can already do for themselves using products available off the shelf or over the Internet without the exuberant costs.


So to warehouse all of these questions about all of these products that continue to spring-up around the world, we have created a special forum just for them.

As I find older questions already posted about products like these, or if any of you find them, send me the link to the forum thread and I'll move it into here as a clearing house for answers on this topic.

Thanks!

Where is this forum I was just looking for it? Cant seem to find it.

gorin002
Dec 13th, 2006, 08:49 AM
are so Manny waxes
i remeber a few what do you think or personal opnion on
zaino
mothers
zymnol and dupont ordu pont wax ?

pcfxer
Dec 13th, 2006, 10:18 AM
Paint protection plans came about because the "market wanted them."

A paint sealant is somewhat different than a wax, not really all that much different as protection products go, but different.

If you want an analytical discussion of the difference between waxes and paint sealants you might want to read the article I just submitted to www.mobileworks.com on the subject.

To briefly explain. The best wax, be it natural or synthetic wax uses only what are called standard silicone fluids and at best they will last from 30 to 60 days depending on climatic conditions in the area and how the car is cared for.

Paint sealants, among other things, uses amino-functional silicones which form a cross-linking molecule when they air dry so they bond to the finish of the paint and last, NOT FOREVER, but maybe, under the best conditions up to 6 months. Under the typically normal conditions maybe only 3 to 4 months.

As Mike points out a dealer protection plan is nothing but a wax job and then insurance which is what the consumer wants. Someone to tell them they do not have to wax their car and it will be OK>

Most of these plans require a reapplication within 6 months. What does that say?

The thing that is wrong with these dealer sold protection plans is that they really do not tell the consmer the whole truth. They make them believe things that are not true.

When I sold guaranteed paint sealants all I guaranteed was that the they will have shine and protection for one year, but they have to come in for a FREE reapplication in 6 months. We sold it for $129.95.

Shine is subjective. The protection was determined by their subjective determination that the water was beading on the finish. Actually beading water is not a determinant of protection. Oil will make water bead. The ingredients in a paint sealant that provide protection, in fact, do not make water bead.

Key is truth in selling.

Bud Abraham
DETAIL PLUS SYSTEMS

1. How can you generalize all of the waxes having x ingredients and all of the sealants having y ingredients?

2. Just because something doesn't have amino functional polymers also doesn't mean that it won't have crosslinked molecules either. In amino functional polymers (and please, mr. chemist if you're out there help me out because I haven't taken chem in a year or so), the polymer is the monomer and the amino is the crosslinking molecule. The aminos fit uniquely into the monomer and when 'bonded' are much stronger than a monomer alone.

This is just one case of this. Meguiar's would most likely use other crosslinking molecules than aminos for various reasons, but to state "at best" performance without proof is pretty pathetic.

Anyway, before I get personal and actually crack out my chemistry book I'll refer you to a Meguiar's 5-step process to protection and that I will guarantee for YEARS!

buda
Dec 14th, 2006, 05:42 AM
Well, if you think that a paint sealant, any paint sealant or paint finishing process will last for 5 years, I have a bridge in Brooklyn that I would like to sell you.

Thanks

Bud Abraham

pcfxer
Dec 14th, 2006, 06:44 AM
Are you misunderstanding what I wrote?

When the Meguiar's 5-step process is completed whenever required, in my case, at least twice a month will make paint last for years. I would be willing to guarantee that any time of the day. We have a 1997 Nissan Quest with pathetic Ford paint and it isn't peeling, cracking or failing in ANY sort of way. That is in the harsh winters of Canada in conjunction with beautiful road salt.

Like I said, I'll guarantee paint by using this process for YEARS!

Mike Phillips
Dec 14th, 2006, 07:25 AM
I think there is just some simple miscommunication, or understanding going on here, that's all. Sometimes the typed word cannot convey fully the intentions of the writer's thoughts and even when they do, sometimes they are not understood as the writer intended. Happens to me all the time.

Sometimes it's a good idea to...

Push away from the keyboard


:) :) :)

Leaving for the open class tonight at Meguiar's... everyone be cool.

cmd
Dec 14th, 2006, 07:21 PM
here in maine the dealerships use a product called ressistall.. and i have to say the warrenty they provide is very impressive. but the product is only so so.

Mike Phillips
Dec 15th, 2006, 09:27 AM
here in maine the dealerships use a product called ressistall.. and i have to say the warrenty they provide is very impressive. but the product is only so so.

Mosca said the dealership he works for uses this... have't seen him posting for a while? Let's hope his health is doing good... :xyxthumbs

MaximusZTS
Dec 15th, 2006, 09:52 AM
Has any one ever heard of "Tropic Shield"? http://www.focusfanatics.com/forum/images/smilies/icon_smile_headscratch.gif There was a panflet of it on my desk this morning. http://www.focusfanatics.com/forum/images/smilies/icon_smile_paranoid.gif

Edit* I just did a google search and found the web site. (tropic-shield.com) at the bottom of that page there is a link to the brochure left on my desk. The people I work with seem to be having this done to thier car despite my best efforts to educate them on proper car care. Can any one help me out with this?

MaximusZTS
Dec 15th, 2006, 12:42 PM
one of the claims is "Conventional sealants & waxes begin to melt when surface temperatures reach 75 F. Your vehicles surface can exceed 150 F in the sun!"

pcfxer
Dec 15th, 2006, 05:14 PM
Isn't that why you wax in the shade and only when the surface is cool to the touch?

Whelan
Dec 21st, 2006, 12:45 PM
In my area a alot of dealers use Simoniz System 5 and charge $500 to have it done. its a simple 20 minute wax job the dealer does. Alls it is is essentially (and most of these protectors) are ****** waxes that claim you need to let it sit for 24 hours with no water on it in order for it to work properly. I've used it before since I worked for Acura and got the bottles for free. It's kinda a gimmick if you ask me and just another form of warranty sales the dealer is offering. Just like rim and tire protection, extended warranties etc. etc.

Just stick with Meguiar's stuff on a regular basis and you will be fine.

RamAirV1
Dec 21st, 2006, 09:50 PM
I hardly ever see dealers around here pushing the paint protection scam anymore. Maybe people are catching on to it?

The bad news is that they are replacing it with other scams like engraving all the glass on the vehicle!

Several years ago I actually got a dealer body shop manager to admit to me that those paint protection scams are just glorified car wax! He then said "you didn't hear that from me!" He was worried he would be in big trouble if someone found out that he said that.

RamAirV1

gorin002
Dec 21st, 2006, 11:23 PM
In my area a alot of dealers use Simoniz System 5 and charge $500 to have it done. its a simple 20 minute wax job the dealer does. Alls it is is essentially (and most of these protectors) are ****** waxes that claim you need to let it sit for 24 hours with no water on it in order for it to work properly. I've used it before since I worked for Acura and got the bottles for free. It's kinda a gimmick if you ask me and just another form of warranty sales the dealer is offering. Just like rim and tire protection, extended warranties etc. etc.

Just stick with Meguiar's stuff on a regular basis and you will be fine.

at mi Meguiar's dealer ship was a buisnes a ****** coat and he saw swirls
he done second time.do not dollars in euros was 400
and than he took bottle of Meguiar's was all gone

Whelan
Dec 22nd, 2006, 05:34 AM
Yep, it is all a scam. The Jeep dealership wanted to charge my gf $1,200 for VIN etching on the windows, she was like umm no. So when she got the car, they actually had picked it up from another dealer. 2005 Liberty Renegade in Silver. So we took it home and realized it had the etching. After checking it turns out the dealer they got it from does it automatically to all cars on the lot, so we got it for free! lol.

Funny too cause at Acura it was only $159 for the etching.

STG
Dec 22nd, 2006, 02:31 PM
You can get a stencil & acid etching kit for a few bucks. It's probably right next to the super sealent (Nxt) on the self at Walmart.

buda
Dec 24th, 2006, 05:23 PM
Paint Sealants are nothing but an evolution of wax technology. In short, in my experience they are nothing but an improved wax. Most good sealants contain a bit of wax in them.

The key difference between a wax and a paint sealant is the use of Amino-Functional Silicones used in sealants vs the standard silicone fluids used in waxes.

These silicones have a cross-linking molecule when cured more or less bond to the finish of the car. That is not to say they stay there for a year or more as some claim. Of course, the small print says you have to renew within 4 to 6 months and give you a small vile of product to apply.

But this become a gold mine for chemical companies and also smart marketers. Who have put together these protection package deals for car dealers with a fancy warranty sheet. Everyone makes money, the chemical company, the marketer, the dealer.

The consumer is getting what they want, "insurance." That is, comfort that their car will shine and be protected, and it comes from a reputable auto dealer. (Wait is that an oxymoron?).

Not all sealants are the same. Some have more shine than others. Some last longer than others. Some are more resistent to corrosion than others.

Hard for one product to be tops in all catagories.

So the chemist formulates what the marketing dept wants to sell.

For example, in our comparative study of 25 popular waxes and sealants used by detailers in the USA and Canada the two products that were #1 and #2 in percentage increase of reflective gloss before and after application as measured by a Glossometer were #18 and #19 in resistence to salt water corrosion.

If anyone would like to see the report email me with your email address buda@detailplus.com

Regards, Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.

Bud Abraham

pcfxer
Dec 24th, 2006, 10:12 PM
You can get a stencil & acid etching kit for a few bucks. It's probably right next to the super sealent (Nxt) on the self at Walmart.

lol, nice!

1937
Jan 11th, 2007, 11:32 AM
I Just Purchased A 2007 Solara Without The Toyo Guard. I Have Just Put Some Water In A Bucket And Was About To Start The Car's First, At Least, My First Wash Job. Ok....what's Next....do I Start With A Carnuba Wax Or Poly Wax, One Of The Nxt Products....etc. What Is The Best First Protection, Kinda Like That First Love, What's The Story About Gold Class Vs The Poly Waxes. Now This Is A Red Solara, Rag Top So You See, I Want To Keep This Beauty Beautiful Forever. Thanks Kind Online Expert About Detailing.

Murr1525
Jan 11th, 2007, 11:38 AM
It would probably be best to just start a new thread in the Detailing 101 forum, and we can give you all the new car links there. We can keep all your questions and answers in one spot easily then.

cmd
Jan 11th, 2007, 11:41 AM
i would suggest a 21 with a top coat of nxt wax

Mike Phillips
Jan 11th, 2007, 11:49 AM
I Just Purchased A 2007 Solara Without The Toyo Guard. I Have Just Put Some Water In A Bucket And Was About To Start The Car's First, At Least, My First Wash Job. Ok....what's Next....do I Start With A Carnuba Wax Or Poly Wax, One Of The Nxt Products....etc. What Is The Best First Protection, Kinda Like That First Love, What's The Story About Gold Class Vs The Poly Waxes. Now This Is A Red Solara, Rag Top So You See, I Want To Keep This Beauty Beautiful Forever. Thanks Kind Online Expert About Detailing.

Like Murr1525 mentioned, your questions would be better posted here,


Detailing 101 (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=22)


Simply copy and paste your words and start a new thread in the above forum.

Then we'll answer your specific questions. Thank you! :)

BlackTop
Jan 31st, 2007, 01:17 PM
I was talking to my boss about detailing his Excursion. he told me that it does not need to be detailed, EVER! he said he got some kind of ****** coating put on at the dealership when he bought it. And the stuff is suppose to last a life time. I told him that did not sound right and I would look into it for him.

Has anyone ever heard of this? Sounds to me like he got scammed.
It's not really a scam. It's like the extended warranty for that TV. Straight commision for the salesman. It's just paint sealant that they put on, and they warrenty the paint. Should he wax it? Hell yeah. Nothing wrong with double protection.

pcfxer
Jan 31st, 2007, 08:43 PM
I know Black Top...geez, where did I see Black Top detailing....? St.Joseph right? With the Meguiar's banner? How's it going? I use to work with KGCCS, but Kyle wants to pay me 15/hr and charge the customer 45/hr so I said screw that.

I've never stopped by, but I've been too busy-I've always figured, hey, they SHOW OFF Meguiar's usage they can't be that bad ;)

nobody
Mar 19th, 2007, 05:04 AM
Hi All,

Wonder Meguiars W8006 Polishing Pad can be use on DA machine like PC 7424 that I currently had. I would like to use it on my PC7424.

Thanks
Nobody

Mike Phillips
Mar 19th, 2007, 06:10 AM
Hi All,

Wonder Meguiars W8006 Polishing Pad can be use on DA machine like PC 7424 that I currently had. I would like to use it on my PC7424.

Thanks
Nobody

Yes, you can use the W-8006 on an Porter Cable Dual Action Polisher.

johnyB
Mar 19th, 2007, 11:16 AM
question for Mike Phillips. Have u ever used or heard any reports about pps technolgy as a product. Take for instance a customer of mine just bought this suv and asked me to redo the interior that the dealer worked on, while i was at it i asked him if he would like it polished and waxed and then whamo i got the "i dont need it waxed for 5 years." So i asked him if they gave him anything tht he needs to use to maintain it, he then showed me a small white bottel (hotel shampoo bottle size). long storie short it had PPS writtin on it and thts it. So i went on the net and did a search there seems to be a pps as a style (if that makes sense) of protection eg. wax and sealent. And theres also a patent claim. Anyways i hope u can shed some light.

Detaillab
Mar 19th, 2007, 12:45 PM
A guy called our shop today and claimed to have a $400.00 polyurethane wax on his hummer. He wanted to know if we had anything as good as or better than this special "wax" I think he got scammed, what do you think?

Mike Phillips
Mar 19th, 2007, 01:09 PM
He got scammed, he just doesn't know it.

You'll have educate him, might be easiest if you can get him to bring his special wax and let you do a side by side demonstrtion with it on black paint.

Blackisbest
Mar 20th, 2007, 10:34 AM
I'll be picking up my new 2007 Nissan Altima in Super Black next month and the dealership is pushing a Simoniz System 5 with ****** paint protection for $500.
I firmly believe Meguiar's products will be more effective. I would like some guidance on the correct steps to give my new car the ultimate paint protection when I get it home. I'm wanting to do the necessary steps the minute I get the car home from the dealership. Please provide me a detailed protocol you would follow if you were bringing home a new car.
Also, what is your opinion on invisible bras? Do you think they are a valuable asset to protect a car or is it hype?

Mosca
Mar 20th, 2007, 03:07 PM
Mosca said the dealership he works for uses this... have't seen him posting for a while? Let's hope his health is doing good... :xyxthumbs

Hi Mike, Tom checking in here.

The dealership I used to work at used Resistall. The one I'm at now uses Simoniz System5. We sell it for $398, the warranty is for 5 years, and no reapplication is necessary.

Since my paycheck (and employment) depends on how many people choose Simoniz System5, everyone gets to hear about it. I simply present the product, say what it is, explain the warranty, and ask them what they prefer, the protection or the $6/mo in their pocket. About half the people say yes to the System5.

Nowhere in the literature does it say, or even imply, that the product will last 5 years; all they say is that if the vehicle gets acid rain spots, bird drop etchings, love bug etching, tree sap, etc, they will repair or repaint the affected panel. And in the actual contract they actually encourage regular washing and waxing! With SIMONIZ products, of course!

If you think about it, for the average person whose car is outside 24/7, it might not be so bad....

The thing is, people take the plan because they want their car to look nice, but without the work. They care, but they don't REALLY care; if they did, they'd wash and wax their car regularly. And since they don't REALLY care, when the car gets the marring they never think to file a claim. Because deep inside they really don't care. Think, the guy who contributes a lot to the collection plate on Sunday because he's such a SOB the rest of the week. You can spend the money but it won't compensate for the neglect.

Now, if they did file a claim, the warranty would work exactly as described; we'd buff, or color sand, or paint the panel as needed. And over a 5 year period, that could very well run over $400 on some cars, and not reach it on others. If a black Suburban parked under a flock of migrating geese it would be heck getting that top de-etched, working aroung the roof rack.

But nobody ever seems to file a claim. Because they care enough, at time of purchase, to spend the money, but they don't care enough after that.


EDIT: As far as appearance, I'd have to say that the stuff looks pretty good. It's fairly comparable to #21, not as wet as NXT but wetter than #20. It's nice and slick. I did a Corvette in the showroom with it, and a year later it's still slick. Of course the car hasn't been washed or waxed in that last year, just Cal Car Duster and a QD every now and then. Remember, the competition doesn't stand still (as well they shouldn't)!

Tom

Setec Astronomy
Mar 20th, 2007, 03:30 PM
Mosca!! party:

glucosegrin
Mar 23rd, 2007, 12:13 PM
I'll be picking up my new 2007 Nissan Altima in Super Black next month and the dealership is pushing a Simoniz System 5 with ****** paint protection for $500.
I firmly believe Meguiar's products will be more effective. I would like some guidance on the correct steps to give my new car the ultimate paint protection when I get it home. I'm wanting to do the necessary steps the minute I get the car home from the dealership. Please provide me a detailed protocol you would follow if you were bringing home a new car.
Also, what is your opinion on invisible bras? Do you think they are a valuable asset to protect a car or is it hype?

Love the '07 Altima. Pushbutton start. Intelligent key. You getting the CVT or the manual? 2.5? 3.5?

Anyway, depending on where you live and how long your Altima was sitting around before you got it, it may have rail dust on parts of the car, and glue lines around where the paint guard film was taken off. Don't expect your car to have anything else on the paint, ie. wax. And don't expect the paint to be perfect. if you check the side body panels (rear quarters below the gas cap level and doors) you will notice the paint is most likely already a bit rough just from shipping. The hood will most likely look fine 'cuz it comes covered in paint guard film which is removed at the dealer, . So you'll want to start maintaining and correcting the finish from day 1.

With the invisible bra, 3M rockguard or whatever your dealer wants to call it, it does not look good on black. unless you do a lot of driving through gravel, it may look worse than the rock chips would :). When you wax the car, the wax will build up on the edge of the tape, putting a white line across the hood. The Altima doesn't have any from the factory, but 350z's, muranos, pathfinders, frontiers, xterras, and versas have clear rock guard tape just in front of the rear wheel wells, you should look at a black one at the dealership and picture the front of your car wrapped in it. Silver it looks okay, black makes it look wavy and outlined, on white the film tends to look yellow after a year or two. It protects well against small rocks they use to sand the roads in the winter here, but it will still tear and chip the paint with big rocks, and is a pain to remove to repair the paint.

If I were picking up a new black car, I'd wash it as soon as I got it home, clay out the dirty feeling parts, and wax it. Some of the more experienced people might give you some more detailed instructions, but your brand new car will look better than showroom if you take care of it right away.

Blackisbest
Mar 28th, 2007, 09:51 AM
Thanks Glucosegrin!!
For economy purposes, I got the 2.5 with the CVT in the SL package. I've already ordered Meguiar's clay kit, show car glaze and the nxt generation tech wax and I'm just waiting on the car to come in. This will be the first new car I've had, so I really want to protect it from day one. I was hoping Meguiar's tech wax wouldn't leave a white residue along any leading edges..ie;leading edge on the hood where the bra adheres.

I've never used a clay bar before and I had reservations on using it on a new car, but do you feel it would be o.k. to use it on a new car? I do plan on protecting the car (polish & waxing....even claying if necessary) the minute I get it home from the dealership.
Thanks for your input!

Murr1525
Mar 28th, 2007, 11:18 AM
Sure you can clay.

DaGonz
Dec 16th, 2007, 09:25 AM
Thanks Glucosegrin!!
For economy purposes, I got the 2.5 with the CVT in the SL package. I've already ordered Meguiar's clay kit, show car glaze and the nxt generation tech wax and I'm just waiting on the car to come in. This will be the first new car I've had, so I really want to protect it from day one. I was hoping Meguiar's tech wax wouldn't leave a white residue along any leading edges..ie;leading edge on the hood where the bra adheres.

I've never used a clay bar before and I had reservations on using it on a new car, but do you feel it would be o.k. to use it on a new car? I do plan on protecting the car (polish & waxing....even claying if necessary) the minute I get it home from the dealership.
Thanks for your input!

Be sure to tell the dealership that you do not want them to wash your new car!

Dealership car prep people are notorius for custom installing the "swirl" option.. if you get a chance, watch them in action. :eek: :wall:

buda
Dec 16th, 2007, 11:32 AM
BlackisBest:

You do not need to clay your vehicle unless there is Industrial Fallout (IFO) on the surface.

You can determine this by simply taking the cellophane wrapper off a package of cigarettes and putting it over the first three fingers on your hand. Rub the various horizontal surfaces of the vehicle and if it feels like "sandpaper" then you should use the clay to remove.

You cannot remove this with wax or even with a buffer and compound, it seems to just "stay there" through the process. Claying is the only way to remove.

When finished claying you can try the cellophane trick again and see if you removed it all.

Regards

Bud Abraham
DETAIL PLUS SYSTEMS

WrightDetail
Jan 4th, 2008, 06:27 AM
Just a way for dealerships to make money these days since they dont make on the selling of the autos....which is part of the reason they push servicing at the dealer as well....:D

RaskyR1
Jan 4th, 2008, 06:51 AM
I've worked at shops where I have applied either AutoArmor or Auto Butler on new cars for the local dealers. We also did under coating, rust proofing, tint, clear bra, spray bed liners, fabric protectants, and full detailing.

$500+ Paint sealant = waste of money!

dcfox01
Jan 8th, 2008, 06:25 AM
I have a 2006 Vista Blue Mustang GT that I show in the "Driven Class" I keep the car as clean as possible for a car that has to stay outside all the time and is driven daily. Of course every once in a while I'll get a scratch or chip and I freak out. I've read so many different brands of scratch remover polish I think that's made. Can anyone out there please tell me what really work?
Thanks for any and all help,
David

dcfox01
Jan 8th, 2008, 06:32 AM
I have a 2006 Vista Blue Mustang GT that I show in the "Driven Class" I keep the car as clean as possible for a car that has to stay outside all the time and is driven daily. Of course every once in a while I'll get a scratch or chip and I freak out. I've read so many different brands of scratch remover polish I think that's made. Can anyone out there please tell me what really work?
Thanks for any and all help,
David

G Force
Jan 8th, 2008, 07:27 AM
I have a 2006 Vista Blue Mustang GT that I show in the "Driven Class" I keep the car as clean as possible for a car that has to stay outside all the time and is driven daily. Of course every once in a while I'll get a scratch or chip and I freak out. I've read so many different brands of scratch remover polish I think that's made. Can anyone out there please tell me what really work?
Thanks for any and all help,
David
Hi David,if you could address this question to detailing 101 (new thread) i think you could receive better help.i am also new here.:wavey

buda
Jan 12th, 2008, 10:34 AM
I have a 2006 Vista Blue Mustang GT that I show in the "Driven Class" I keep the car as clean as p[FONT=Times New Roman][SIZE=3]ossible for a car that has to stay outside all the time and is driven daily. Of course every once in a while I'll get a scratch or chip and I freak out. I've read so many different brands of scratch remover polish I think that's made. Can anyone out there please tell me what really work?


If you have a chip or true scratch in the paint you are not going to get them out with polish, colored waxes, etc. They will have to be professionally touched up or at the least, with the paint you can buy from the dealer with a small brush.

If you are talking about "scuffs" in the paint they can be removed with a buffer and some light or micro-fine compound. Or, maybe by hand.

As for the colored polishes on the market, I would not recommend them.

Regards
Bud Abraham
DETAIL PLUS SYSTEMS

Andy M.
Jan 12th, 2008, 10:46 AM
I know about all of the confusion here personally. My Mom has a 2003 Malibu that she refuses to let me touch due to this so-called paint protection that the dealership sells as a paint protection plan. I keep telling her that I can make it look like new again, but she won't budge. I have brought this up before. She will even tell me I have a scratch here or there, and I tell her I can take care of it. She says that will void my paint warranty. PAINT WARRANTY I SAY! UGH!!!!!

Andy
101impala:rolleyes:

AeroCleanse
Jan 12th, 2008, 11:04 AM
Paint protection from the dealer just means they used a polymer paint sealant and not a carnuba wax.

OPA1
Jan 12th, 2008, 02:00 PM
Since this thread started a llllloooooonnnnggggg while back it's been said over and over.a paint protection plan looks good when you pick up your car but like every thing at the dealers it's HOW TO MAKE MORE off the customer. Nothing ever lasts forever. I stick with the only paint plan that works, The Meguiar's Plan.:xyxthumbs

buda
Jan 13th, 2008, 04:24 PM
No need to be critical of the dealer's paint protection plans. They use a good quality paint sealant and give insurance to the customer. The customer buys it because they want it, the dealer is not ripping them off. The plan is carefully explained and the custome buys it.

Detailers should be focusing on how to sell a similiar program to their customers. We used to have a New Car Protection Plan for $199.95 which included 1 year guaranteed paint sealant and the fabric protectant. Both had to be renewed for FREE in 6 months to keep guarantee. We only guaranteed the water to bead and paint to shine and the carpets & upholstery to not stain from spilled liquids. If the customer came back we renewed the sealant and cleaned up the stain and reapplied. A much better deal than $500 to $700 at the dealership.

Suggest you all consider this rather than criticizing a very successful program.

Use it to your advantage rather than complaining.

Just some well intentioned thoughts on the subject.

Bud Abraham

Sprzout
Mar 12th, 2008, 10:40 PM
My dealership that sold me my Mustang GT kept trying to push the paint protectant to me...I told them it wasn't necessary. The finance guy who was working with me kept trying to push me on it, until I told him, "Look. Go out and look at the car I'm trading in. It's 5 years old, and it looks as good as the day I bought it, with the exception of a few rock chips in the hood. That's because I know how to detail cars. I don't need the paint protection; I'll take care of the car myself."

The finance manager stopped pushing it when I told him I used to spend 6-8 hours on the weekends claying the car, polishing, and then waxing it.

I think that these plans are good for the average joe who wants their car to look good for a while; most people will go, "Oh, I just need to wash the car off every once in a while so that it doesn't look dirty anymore." No wax, just run it through an automatic car wash, and be ready to go when it comes out of the air dryer at the end. I don't think these paint protection/sealants are all that great, but there are the people who want to have it rolled into the cost of the car, because they think it's going to be added protection, and then they never think about it again.

Larry A
Mar 13th, 2008, 06:17 AM
Car dealers have to have something to sell.In the 50s and 60s it was Blue Coral , Porcelinize, and Luster Seal. In the 40s it was Simonize, Dupont Spray Glaze, and seat covers.

bulldog shine
Mar 13th, 2008, 06:36 AM
Car dealers will always look for ways to make omney off of somebody. It is the nature of the beast look at the overhead they have. I mean they (car dealers) have a hundred cars sitting around. They have to pay for them some how and this is just another way. Here in the east that paint protection will not last with all the salt they dump on the roads.

Don
May 13th, 2008, 06:17 PM
Car dealers have to have something to sell.In the 50s and 60s it was Blue Coral , Porcelinize, and Luster Seal. In the 40s it was Simonize, Dupont Spray Glaze, and seat covers.

In the shop where I worked (and contracted full-blown OCD), the speciality there was the Porcelinizing. I don't think I'm giving away any industrial secrets, but the process was basically a 5-step - ALMOST what is recommended here with the exception of the heavy-duty compounding the boss insisted on for every car that came in:

After washing:

1) 1,000 grit compound (leave on)
2) Meguiars Cleaner Wax (A12) over compound residue, remove
3) Meguiars Cleaner Wax, remove
4) Meguiars #7 (or #3) allow to sit for an hour
5) Meguiars #16 over #7 residue, 15 minute (minimum) dwell time, remove.

We would use the old cast-aluminum bodied buffers with the 12" terry bonnets...those things were HEAVY!

His process was sound, but his insistance on using compound started to make my hair stand on end after I started doing it more and it hit me...why SCOUR (hard on the finish-risks damage, creates work, etc), when all you need to do is buff?

eric_son
Sep 15th, 2008, 04:36 PM
Our local Honda dealer has been trying to push their "Hydrophilic (water loving)" paint protection program to their customers since 2005. Interesting concept, but I love working on my car every weekend so I always refuse the offer.

More details here: Honda's Hydrophilic Paint Protection (http://www.hondamakati.com.ph/Ver2/News&Events/Default.asp?IDs=28&Submit=Features)

redhotchevy2000
Sep 21st, 2008, 12:38 PM
im sorry but from what i have seen honda paint stinks if you dont take care of it... i dont think the hydrophillic plan will go over very well...



EDITED FOR NON-FAMILY FRIENDLY CONTENT-Andy M.

eric_son
Sep 21st, 2008, 10:38 PM
im sorry but from what i have seen honda paint stinks if you dont take care of it... i dont think the hydrophillic plan will go over very well...

I agree!

The paint on my Honda is so soft and fragile. I swear I can cause swirls to appear if I stare at my car long enough. Hehehehe.

Anyway, nothing beats regular washing, polishing and waxing/sealing.

Andy M.
Sep 22nd, 2008, 05:18 AM
Lets please make sure this thread stays going in the right direction.

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mb911
Feb 25th, 2009, 07:44 AM
On my latest car, they really tried to sell the coating with a T. It was hard for me to refrain myself, from going mad on those people. I believe it was 600-700 dollars.

First they told me they had really good wax on the car right now protecting it ,yeah right, it was what the car wash sprayed on it. ha-ha.

Then they told me what they'd do is clay the car, and I probably don't know what that is. I told them I clay all the time. Then they told me I could clay for them then! ha-ha.

Then they said they'd heat bond the special stuff to the paint, and they couldn't recommend it more. ha-ha.

The sales lady had told me earlier that she has it on her car and anything just wipes off now. ok.

They accepted me saying no, but it just pains me.

If they want to sell something for that much money, why not sell a program where you pay and they'll wax your car every 2 months for a year or something? That would be better, in my opinion, than talking of a special super paint protection that lasts so long.

The only thing is I bet these dealerships actually believe in this stuff. Maybe I'm wrong, but I think maybe some of them believe in it, with all their heart. They also seem to act like it lasts forever despite the need for the yearly touch up or whatever. It should be six times a year touchup.

Hope that isn't out of line, but I think we all know here at these forums, that these protections don't last forever. Like everyone says, it's really a hard to maintain warranty you're buying.

I don't remember where I read it, but like I read someone say somewhere, if this coating was so amazing, manufacturers would do it, at least some of them, to keep their cars standing out on the road.

Just my opinion though, but boy I worry about my parents and stuff ever paying out that much money, 600-700 on such a product, for the fact they would think they're getting something really special.

Mike Phillips
Feb 25th, 2009, 07:55 AM
I don't remember where I read it, but like I read someone say somewhere, if this coating was so amazing, manufacturers would do it, at least some of them, to keep their cars standing out on the road.



The idea being if there really is a miracle coating that lasts a real long time and protects against everything and makes the paint look great... (That's 3 things), then why doesn't the paint manufacture include that with the coating either as a part of the paint system or as a component added after the paint is baked on but before the car leaves the assembly line?

The answer is because such a wax or paint sealant or miracle product doesn't exist, at least not at this time.

Even if there is a miracle coating you can apply or have applied, what do you do when something happens to the coating and how do you take care of the coating?

At this time, it's better to simply take ownership of the car washing and waxing steps and find a product you like and trust and use it as often as needed to keep your car's appearance and value at a level that meets your expectations.

:)

mb911
Feb 25th, 2009, 11:40 AM
Exactly true Mike. I'm glad my passion for car care has led me to know not to believe in such claims.

Now, if they had tried to push me to get a clear 3m film on the front bumper. That is actually something helpful. ha-ha. Strangely, many dealers seem to put down the protectors. Much be more work/less profit.

Bigbucks1959
Apr 21st, 2009, 02:09 AM
Thats just plain sick, You are implying that everyone smokes on here...Yuck

Just use a simple plastic sandwich bag.

PK


BlackisBest:

You do not need to clay your vehicle unless there is Industrial Fallout (IFO) on the surface.

You can determine this by simply taking the cellophane wrapper off a package of cigarettes and putting it over the first three fingers on your hand. Rub the various horizontal surfaces of the vehicle and if it feels like "sandpaper" then you should use the clay to remove.

You cannot remove this with wax or even with a buffer and compound, it seems to just "stay there" through the process. Claying is the only way to remove.

When finished claying you can try the cellophane trick again and see if you removed it all.

Regards

Bud Abraham
DETAIL PLUS SYSTEMS

Bigbucks1959
Apr 21st, 2009, 02:11 AM
My parents are the same on both of their vehicles..I gave up asking them anymore.

PK


I know about all of the confusion here personally. My Mom has a 2003 Malibu that she refuses to let me touch due to this so-called paint protection that the dealership sells as a paint protection plan. I keep telling her that I can make it look like new again, but she won't budge. I have brought this up before. She will even tell me I have a scratch here or there, and I tell her I can take care of it. She says that will void my paint warranty. PAINT WARRANTY I SAY! UGH!!!!!

Andy
101impala:rolleyes:

akimel
May 8th, 2009, 10:24 AM
Over at Detailing World there's been a lot of talk about some of the new nano-technology sealants--specifically Nanolex (http://www.nanolex-international.com/html/nanolex_premium1.html) and G|techniq (http://www.gtechniq.com/). These appear to be the real deal. They apparently need to be applied in a controlled environment by trained professionals, and the cost is expensive. I do not know if these products have made it to the States yet or not.

pcfxer
May 8th, 2009, 11:15 AM
Over at Detailing World there's been a lot of talk about some of the new nano-technology sealants--specifically Nanolex (http://www.nanolex-international.com/html/nanolex_premium1.html) and G|techniq (http://www.gtechniq.com/). These appear to be the real deal. They apparently need to be applied in a controlled environment by trained professionals, and the cost is expensive. I do not know if these products have made it to the States yet or not.

Can you provide some unbiased 3rd party members with some quantitative results?

akimel
May 8th, 2009, 11:29 AM
Can you provide some unbiased 3rd party members with some quantitative results?

Haha! Unbiased? I don't think there is such a thing as an unbiased detailer. :D

As I mentioned, Detailing World is the forum where I stumbled upon the discussion of these products. You might want to do a search for the relevant threads. Dave KG, I know, has had some positive initial experience with the Nanolex basic sealant.

mackpenn
May 8th, 2009, 12:41 PM
I have heard of a product out of the west coast called trident that guarentees the paint on new and used cars for eight years. That almost needs its own infomercial.

foilr
May 8th, 2009, 07:40 PM
The Finance Guy when I bought my cars really pushed their paint and interior insurance plan. He claimed they coated the vehicle inside and out with some super protectant. What really ticked me off was the scare tactics he used to try to sell it. He claimed customers with 3 month old cars had surface problems that were not covered by warranty. He also said that since the government forced the end of lead paint that my new Honda's were only covered with one layer of water based color and one layer of clearcoat. He was basically trashing their own product.

If my paint starts peeling in 3 YEARS I will make such a scene in the dealership and escalate through the Customer Service division, until they will repaint the car to be rid of me.

I know they try to make extra profit on these things, but the strongarm approach made me mad.

Richard

wijaya
Apr 18th, 2012, 08:31 PM
hi, there..
is it save to use Ultimate Compound and Ultimate polish on the paint protection coating?..
or they can damage my paint protection layer?..

buda
Apr 18th, 2012, 09:30 PM
If you use a compound and a polish on a
Paint finish it will remove any paint protection

Bud Abraham

wijaya
Apr 19th, 2012, 12:07 AM
Thanks for the advice, so i cannot use any abrasive stuff right?.. , so i have to use pure polish (Ex:DC step 2)?..

buda
Apr 19th, 2012, 05:23 AM
Thanks for the advice, so i cannot use any abrasive stuff right?.. , so i have to use pure polish (Ex:DC step 2)?..

By proper definition a "polish" is an abrasive also....

If you have a paint protection film on your paint finish all you need to do is apply another coat of the same paint protection product.

However, if there are scratches, abrasions, water-spotting then if will be necessary to correct those problems with a compound, followed by a swirl-remover/polish followed by another coat of paint protection film.

Regards
Bud Abraham

Blumax1
Jun 7th, 2015, 07:53 AM
If everyone can stand one more post concerning paint protection plans I believe I can offer some valuable info. I have been on both sides of the issue. I worked as a sales manager at a Toyota/Chevrolet dealership for 20 years before becoming an agent/consultant at a dealer agency 20 years ago. My agency avoided these paint protection programs for years due mainly to the claims made by some finance managers which created unrealistic expectations. Some of the claims made concerning the performance of these products actually challenged the common sense of many consumers. When the vehicle is returned to the customer the only thing that had changed was that bad spot was now a shinny bad spot. Until about 8 to 10 years ago the warranty that came with the purchase of these products had a limit of liability to do nothing more than have the effected area "detailed". In dealershipease this means buff the hell out of it. The customer picks up their vehicle and nothing is actually repaired but that bad area is now shinny. Years ago I came across a product called Xzilon that raised the bar. Xzilon would actually repaint the effected panel. They would also replace any material in the interior that was stained and could not be cleaned. My agency agreed this would address our concerns regarding the customers expectations. Before when the customer realized that his/her vehicle was in fact not going to be repaired the dealer had a very unhappy customer. This is the primary reason we never offered these products to our clients. My agency now offers two similar products....Xzilon and Perma Plate. Bot of these products offer 7 year plans. Do they work as advertised.....NO if we're talking about these products protecting paint or interior for up to 7 years. We train finance managers to present these products as insurance and not some miracle product that will improve your *** life. I've heard a finance manager tell a customer that they didn't even have to wash their car and a garden hose will remove the black break dust that collects on the wheels when treated with xyz product. The product is usually provided to the dealer at no cost. What generates the cost is the activation of the warranty. Claims are simple and I'm not aware of one contract in 8 years being denied. Then again we see very few claims and in most cases claims are so few the dealer forgets how to submit a claim. Does this mean these products actually work or more a case of people forgetting they have this protection? I don't know but I can tell you that a used car is worth considerable more without paint/interior defects when it's time to trade or sell.

buda
Jun 7th, 2015, 09:26 AM
The newest innovation on the market is liquid glass coating which is the "real deal. It is literally a "glass coating" that leaves a shine you have never seen. The protection is several years.

Read my article on liquid glass coating on my Facebook page, explains it all.

Expensive , but not worth what the big names in the field are charging

Blumax1
Jun 7th, 2015, 09:50 AM
The newest innovation on the market is liquid glass coating which is the "real deal. It is literally a "glass coating" that leaves a shine you have never seen. The protection is several years.

Read my article on liquid glass coating on my Facebook page, explains it all.

Expensive , but not worth what the big names in the field are charging

Couldn't locate the FB article but did some Google searching. Is the product you're writing about a sealer? There are several different "Liquid Glass Products" and all are described as a paint sealant.

Found this to be interesting.
http://www.autogeek.net/nano-paint-sealant.html

buda
Jun 8th, 2015, 07:56 AM
Couldn't locate the FB article but did some Google searching. Is the product you're writing about a sealer? There are several different "Liquid Glass Products" and all are described as a paint sealant.

Found this to be interesting.
http://www.autogeek.net/nano-paint-sealant.html

Blumax1:

Strange you could not find my Facebook Page - Bud Abraham. If you scroll down far enough you will find the article, it is very good and explains the difference between a wax, a sealant and the liquid glass coating.

What the industry knows as a sealant is much like a wax. It contains dimotameous earth; solvent, oils, silicones, some sealants use wax, some do not.

Liquid Glass Coatings are not at all formulated like this they are Sodium Silicate (SiO2). It is a coating of pure, safe, quartz glass or silicon dioxide.

If you send me your email I can send you the article: buda@detailplus.com

TRDTACO
Jun 8th, 2015, 08:07 PM
I worked at a Lincoln/Mercury dealership as an auto technician. When the service department was slow I would prep and detail the new cars being sold. When a customer would pay hundreds extra for interior and exterior protection they would have me apply a off brand poor quality paint sealant to the exterior and several trigger pull sprays of an off brand low quality scotch guard interior protection. It was allways done in the back of the shop in the detail department before the customer would have the car delivered. I was disgusted that for 500$ plus dollars this was the interior and exterior protection they offered. I would never pay for this protection on a new vehicle knowing how much of a joke/ripoff it is. Just my 2 cents working at a stealership. Save your hard earned cash and scotch guard the interior yourself for less than 20$ and buy a paint sealant and diy and save hundreds.

Blumax1
Jun 12th, 2015, 05:35 AM
How do some people continue to miss the point regarding these paint protection products? Many of these products perform very well but to think that they will protect anything for years is ridiculous. Yes, scotch guard works as well as anything but if it fails will they pay to have the effected area repaired? There are many products that work as well or better than the material used in these programs but there is NO off the shelf product that will pay to have effected areas repainted like some of these programs provide. Stop looking at this as something it's not. If you have kids and buying a minivan to hall them and their friends around then I don't think $100 per year is an unreasonable cost to insure your interior is not "protected" but "insured" against permanent damage that would effect the resale value. Don't make this more complicated than it is. Critics will make negative claims concerning the so called protection these products provide while ignoring the real purpose of these programs which is simply an insurance policy against damage to the paint or interior. I'm familiar with several of these programs and don't know of any of them that require maintenance or a reapplication of the product. This reapplication requirement is usually implemented by the dealer with hopes of getting the customer back to the service department for a 3 million point inspection. This is real world in today's retail business. It cost much more to attract a new customer than it does to keep the customers you already have. It's call customer retention and is a component of any successful retail business model. Nobody makes the claim that the slick ads that are being used by clothing stores are for the purpose of getting the customer back into the store. This is a good business practice that CAN help both the consumer and the dealer benefit. Not everyone reads the factory maintenance schedule in the owners manual so they need information to properly maintain a $30,000 vehicle. Above all....read the damned contract before you sign. Some of these products will only have a vehicle "professionally detailed" which means compound and buff the effected panel and does not repair anything. It only makes bad paint shinny.

Blumax1
Jun 20th, 2015, 12:15 PM
"Push servicing" "Just a way for dealerships to make money" You were expecting a car dealership to ignore products that will compensate for giving you a good deal on a new car? They offer a program that includes an insurance policy that will repair including repainting effected areas both inside and out. Why would anyone have a problem with any company making a profit? It's not as if they pull a gun and force you to purchase.....anything.