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View Full Version : getting wax/polish, etc off plastic trim?



navyblue2000
Sep 4th, 2006, 04:54 PM
I feel like a total doofus...

I wasn't entirely "careful" this past time around and got some polish and wax splatter on some black plastic trim...any good way of removing?

Michael Stoops
Sep 4th, 2006, 07:28 PM
Get yourself a bottle of #39 Heavy Duty Vinyl Cleaner and apply it vigorously with a terry towel. We've all gotten wax on trim, and you'll do it again sometime in the future. Having a bottle of 39 around is a huge help - the stuff is just awesome.

gb387
Sep 4th, 2006, 07:37 PM
Here is another suggestion..... I use Quik Detailer and a soft bristle brush like an old tooth brush, works well. Then apply your protectant.

chargersrt8S/C
Sep 4th, 2006, 08:12 PM
Sounds funny and weird but peanut butter or peanut oil is one of the easiest ways to remove wax from plastic or vinyl trim. Put some on a rag and scrub and wipe the area and it will look good as new.

kadidle77
Oct 5th, 2006, 04:52 PM
I used plastic trim detailer on my 01' jeep grand cherokee and it took off all the white wax residue and left a good finish

Hemin8r
Oct 6th, 2006, 10:46 AM
I've used the All Purpose Cleaner Diluted 4:1 from the Detailier line & that seems to do the work for me. I'll spray it on let it soak in a bit & brush.

Mike Phillips
Oct 6th, 2006, 11:00 AM
Sounds funny and weird but peanut butter or peanut oil is one of the easiest ways to remove wax from plastic or vinyl trim. Put some on a rag and scrub and wipe the area and it will look good as new.

The Peanut Butter trick is posted all over the Internet, but in reality, it's not the Peanut Butter, as in the peanut part, but the oil in the peanut butter that does the dissolving. A person could avoid the peanut butter part, the actual peanut portion of peanut butter and just use cooking vegetable oil.

It's the same tip/trick for removing/dissolving chewing gum out of carpet or hair. :D

Lydia
Oct 14th, 2006, 04:06 PM
#40, a terry towel, and a little bit of "oomph" seems to do the trick for me :xyxthumbs

OctaneGuy
Oct 14th, 2006, 04:20 PM
I second that. #40 as a one step cleaner/dressing is my preference over #39 which used to be my favorite. :xyxthumbs


#40, a terry towel, and a little bit of "oomph" seems to do the trick for me :xyxthumbs

Michael Stoops
Oct 14th, 2006, 08:03 PM
#40, a terry towel, and a little bit of "oomph" seems to do the trick for me :xyxthumbs


I second that. #40 as a one step cleaner/dressing is my preference over #39 which used to be my favorite.

So, the seasoned pro whom I greatly respect and the young upstart who's passion I admire both prefer #40 to my recommendation of #39. Hmmmmm, perchance a rethink is needed on my part????


Oh, wait, I know.......if the wax residue has been allowed to sit and is stubborn, then go with the #39, but definitely follow up with the #40 to protect. How's that?:LOLOL:

PaintPolisher
Oct 14th, 2006, 08:05 PM
I will third it on #40 being my newest best friend, this product is just amazing.
Al

chief1356
Oct 19th, 2006, 04:43 PM
never used #39 but i do like that #40. cleans everything off and leaves a nice finish. IMHO

rascal
Oct 29th, 2006, 07:28 PM
I use #39 w/ Meguiar's Triple Duty Detailing brush for all the plastic molding and door handles. The brush doesn't scratch paint and gets into those tight spots really well. I follow-up that with some Meguiar's Trim Detailer in either the spray can or liquid gel form. Awesome stuff!:xyxthumbs

noswirler
Nov 10th, 2006, 12:50 PM
real quick, coat all trim BEFORE polishing or waxing work every time:spot

mckeand13
Nov 13th, 2006, 10:17 AM
The Peanut Butter trick is posted all over the Internet, but in reality, it's not the Peanut Butter, as in the peanut part, but the oil in the peanut butter that does the dissolving. A person could avoid the peanut butter part, the actual peanut portion of peanut butter and just use cooking vegetable oil.

It's the same tip/trick for removing/dissolving chewing gum out of carpet or hair. :D

Question. If peanut butter or vegetable oil is used to clean fabric, how do you then remove the peanut butter or oil once the "stain" is dissolved.

kausion
Dec 27th, 2006, 06:29 PM
sorry i just got a question where do yall get these numbers for products from i look at the website and it doesn't say those numbers

Tom Claessens
Dec 28th, 2006, 03:17 AM
Meguiars Online Acronyms - Product Links (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1293)

If you work long enough with the products, you'll get to know most products by their number instead of their product name.


sorry i just got a question where do yall get these numbers for products from i look at the website and it doesn't say those numbers

jeffgrice
Jan 21st, 2007, 08:52 AM
I used Meguiar's purple tire dressing for all plastic parts - works great.

Jeff

CRASH3
Mar 19th, 2007, 02:22 PM
After getting wax on the trim and reading this thread I tried some #40 and "BAM":bigups it was gone and looks better then it did new!

Thanks,:)

chiquae07
Mar 29th, 2007, 07:54 PM
with all honesty, i diddnt think this would work. mike said it would. vegetable oil. im not kidding.

tried the oil at home, and worked like crazy. i went out and bought a huge thing of it for like 2 bucks at the local grocery. it turned all my faded black trim, to like brand new. i went crazy with it, and did all the rubber in the doors, on the windows, the windshield wipers, etc. you name it, i covered it in vegetable oil. just not componants in the engine bay. i was smart enough to not do those.....yet.

i did remove the excess with a clean cloth. the cloth wasnt 100% terry or anythin special. gave the car a wash afterwards. the rubber still looks like new. looks like i picked up a new trick today.

and to my knowlage, doesnt remove wax. so i got up all the left over wax from my 1st ever wax job. all that wax came off. now all i have to do is really clean the wheel wells, and remove the wheels, to apply this vegetable oil. man its crazy.

badhemi
Apr 4th, 2007, 12:44 PM
just don't get near a dirt raod. lol i tried peanut oil and it works great. put some on the trim with wax on it waited about 5 minutes then rubbed it with a mf towel an wax is gone.

jdavino49
Apr 15th, 2008, 02:24 PM
:wavey#39 AND #40? Where can I get some?

jdavino49
Apr 15th, 2008, 02:27 PM
:idea:#39 and #40? Where can I get them? Thanks

RedHotBeretta
Apr 29th, 2008, 10:42 AM
Rubbing alcohol works also. I just make sure I protect it right after with trim detailer. Also I have done the dawn dish soap diluted with a small tooth brush. Worked for me.

IWantaTurbo
Jul 1st, 2008, 11:09 AM
Question. If peanut butter or vegetable oil is used to clean fabric, how do you then remove the peanut butter or oil once the "stain" is dissolved.

I too would like to know as I am allergic to peanuts.

Murr1525
Jul 1st, 2008, 11:15 AM
I could only think to try a regular carpet/fabric cleaner then, like the Quick Out or APC, etc.

As far as cleaning trim if you are allergic, just go with something like #39 or APC with a soft toothbrush, should clean it right up.

cv_soccer
Jul 1st, 2008, 11:38 AM
Sounds funny and weird but peanut butter or peanut oil is one of the easiest ways to remove wax from plastic or vinyl trim. Put some on a rag and scrub and wipe the area and it will look good as new.Chunky or creamy ???

Mr Mustang
Jul 1st, 2008, 09:02 PM
creamy, rub it in, let it sit for a few seconds, then wipe down, and wash to make sure you got rid of it

Rip
Sep 6th, 2008, 01:23 PM
Has anyone tried KRUD CUTTER found at Home Depot in the paint dept. ??
I found this stuff disolves the wax residue and after wiping off the wax I tape off the plastic and re-apply NXT 2 and then #26 Yellow wax NO MO SMEARS

sunny2185
Sep 16th, 2008, 08:43 AM
#40, a terry towel, and a little bit of "oomph" seems to do the trick for me :xyxthumbs




are u sure?:scratchhead1

J. A. Michaels
Sep 16th, 2008, 09:20 AM
are u sure?:scratchhead1

Yes. It works for me.

c5rick
Sep 17th, 2008, 03:50 PM
The Peanut Butter trick is posted all over the Internet, but in reality, it's not the Peanut Butter, as in the peanut part, but the oil in the peanut butter that does the dissolving. A person could avoid the peanut butter part, the actual peanut portion of peanut butter and just use cooking vegetable oil.

It's the same tip/trick for removing/dissolving chewing gum out of carpet or hair. :D
That takes the fun out of It :chuckle1

DogParkGuy
Sep 18th, 2008, 02:00 PM
Wax on plastic or vinyl will come off much easier if the surface is warm. When I had this problem with my wife's Volvo, I parked it so the sun was shining directly on the side vinyl. After a few hours, the wax had expanded out of the pores. Used vinyl cleaner to remove the wax. You could also use a hair dryer to warm up the surface.

electricgreen
Mar 11th, 2009, 10:20 AM
When I bought my car it had wax on the black plastic mirrors and cowl cover. I used GC trim detailer and a soft toothbrush, removed the built up wax and brought the plastic back to life (turned back to deep black instead of brownish black).

Andrew C.
Mar 16th, 2009, 11:32 PM
Another trick I have used before which you an use very precisely is to use a pencil eraser. It works pretty darn well.

nancydotcom
May 26th, 2009, 06:17 AM
A dry Mr. Clean Magic Eraser works fast with little effort. I haven't had any problems with it, but I'm always careful around the paint.

xantonin
May 26th, 2009, 09:28 AM
real quick, coat all trim BEFORE polishing or waxing work every time:spot

Really? I'm wondering on the best order for that.

If you coat the trim before though, you may get wax on it after and have to re-coat it. Is that only recommended if you tape up the trim?

Couldn't the trap leave some residue behind too?

Mike Phillips
May 26th, 2009, 11:38 AM
real quick, coat all trim BEFORE polishing or waxing work every time:spot


Really? I'm wondering on the best order for that.

If you coat the trim before though, you may get wax on it after and have to re-coat it. Is that only recommended if you tape up the trim?

Couldn't the trap leave some residue behind too?


Just to note, Meguiar's doesn't recommend dressing trim as a preventative measure against staining caused by compounds, polishes and waxes.

Instead, we teach people to slow down and be careful and avoid getting these types of product on trim in the first place.

If you want to take an extra precaution to prevent staining of trim then use blue painters tape and tape-off and cover any trim you want to protect.


Just posted some answers about this here,

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=33713




Also, any good recommendations for keeping wax off of the black plastic trim on my vehicle? Or, what is the best way to remove it?




Be careful, pay attention, don't run your applicator pad into or over any black plastic trim or rubber. There's also blue painter's tape.

How to tape-off a car (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&postid=33720)

Basically you use painters tape and whatever else you can find to cover over anything you don't want to get polish or wax splatter on. The Corvette below was put through a complete buff-out using a rotary buffer, thus the side pipes and event the tires and wheels were covered to prevent any splatter from the rotating pad on the rotary buffer from getting on these components.

During the process

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/21963CorvetteafterDACP1.jpg

Afterwards on display

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/2Sandys1963Corvetteatevent.jpg



How far you want to go with your car is up to you and how you plan on applying the products.

By hand you can avoid taping anything off as long as you slow down and work carefully.


:xyxthumbs<!-- / message --><!-- sig -->

xantonin
May 26th, 2009, 12:16 PM
Thanks Mike, that answered a question I've had for a while.

I was originally concerned over using the trim products after waxing because I feared if they were too strong in cleaning agents they may strip the wax or damage the paint.

Mike Phillips
May 26th, 2009, 12:22 PM
I was originally concerned over using the trim products after waxing because I feared if they were too strong in cleaning agents they may strip the wax or damage the paint.


When it comes to Meguiar's trim product, you're above concern would be the least of my worries.


:)

xantonin
May 26th, 2009, 12:23 PM
That's good to know, thank you! :D

I imagine then that the cleaning process is best as follows:

1) Paint
2) Trim/Tires
3) WINDOWS!

Haha, I figure Windows should be last since the trim product may smear them. ;)

roger 668
May 28th, 2009, 04:15 PM
I found,quite by accident,using a dry wash KOZAK and rubbing the trim hard it removes the residue and leaves a nice finish.

Eddie6th
Jun 3rd, 2009, 01:50 PM
The Peanut Butter trick is posted all over the Internet, but in reality, it's not the Peanut Butter, as in the peanut part, but the oil in the peanut butter that does the dissolving. A person could avoid the peanut butter part, the actual peanut portion of peanut butter and just use Cooking Vegetable oil.

:D

I was clumsy too.I tried your method yesterday,checked today and it worked perfectley.Prevention is better than cure,but can't always be helped.

Thanks Mike for that tip!! :bigups

Tuck91
Jun 3rd, 2009, 02:19 PM
usually some M40 does the trick for me.