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Perfectshine
Sep 21st, 2006, 02:03 AM
I wonder how long does it take for every each person in various part of the world to detail a car. Would be nice to hear it out.

I spent 6hrs by hand doing washing, claying, dc1, dc2, waxing x2.

matt colvin
Sep 21st, 2006, 04:42 AM
Well, it really depends on what I'm doing. If it's clay, the full 80's series, a pure polish, and then at least two coats of lsp, well, it takes a couple days. I also have to clean all visible undercoating, under the hood, polish the different metallic finishes, and dress all rubber and vinyl surfaces. And then after that, the interior gets some attention.

A full-size pickup just takes longer though. I would vote a day or day + if I had that option.

SiriusRIMZ
Sep 21st, 2006, 05:15 AM
I chose 1/2 day. I'll either try to get up early and be done by noon so I can enjoy the rest of my day, or I'll start at about noon and have my truck ready for any evening events.

Normally a Wash, Clay, Cleaner Polish, Polish, Wax x2 will take me about 7-8 Hours. Maybe more if I do a full interior carpet washing. I'll normally invite a friend over and some how make them feel guilty just sitting there and make them do some work, so it goes by pretty fast.

MikeGT
Sep 21st, 2006, 05:18 AM
9-12hrs for a detail for me.

I do everything by hand.

Mike Phillips
Sep 21st, 2006, 08:27 AM
12 to 14 hours by machine, Removing the swirls out of the Joker and restoring a show car finish took about 16 hours, this included both the rotary buffer and the G100. Part of the reason for this was because the paint was hard, the swirls were deep and there was a lot of surface are to carefully go over.

http://www.showcargarage.com/gallery/files/1/JokarTapedOff09.jpg


After - note it's dark now...

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/500/medium/700_JokerFinished002.jpg

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/500/medium/700_JokerFinished001.jpg

Lydia
Sep 21st, 2006, 10:47 AM
It depends on how much I do and what condition the paint is in in the first place. It could take any where from 2 hours to multiple days.


That's yours Mike??

supernac1
Sep 21st, 2006, 10:49 AM
12 to 14 hours by machine, Removing the swirls out of the Joker and restoring a show car finish took about 16 hours, this included both the rotary buffer and the G100. Part of the reason for this was because the paint was hard, the swirls were deep and there was a lot of surface are to carefully go over.

http://www.showcargarage.com/gallery/files/1/JokarTapedOff09.jpg


After - note it's dark now...

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/500/medium/700_JokerFinished002.jpg

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/500/medium/700_JokerFinished001.jpg

Dude.....is that your truck:bigups

GTBrad
Sep 21st, 2006, 12:32 PM
Dude.....is that your truck:bigups

No, that's not Mike's truck

A usual detail takes about 8-10 hours this includes...

Interior spot clean and vac,
Engine bay Safe-D and Hyper,
Exterior including Clay, 2 passes of #80 and 1 coat of #21

Tillmanator
Sep 21st, 2006, 03:45 PM
For just a wash and a tire/trim dressing, it's an hour with hubby and me working. For a full round of it with carpet, windows, interior, leather and then wash, clay, polish, and waxing twice, it's a good 6 hours or more. And that's by hand with hubby helping. And we have a small car.... '06 Mustang. I dread to think how long it might take with only one person and a larger vehicle.

indigo s10
Sep 21st, 2006, 06:13 PM
I chose 5 hours, but that is on average. I've done 2 hours, and I 've done 2 days.

Perfectshine
Sep 21st, 2006, 07:30 PM
I dread to think how long it might take with only one person and a larger vehicle.

....exactly tillmanator:iagree:

Krazy Ken
Sep 21st, 2006, 10:24 PM
It depends on how much I do and what condition the paint is in in the first place. It could take any where from 2 hours to multiple days.

:iagree:
It is really hard to give a specific time frame. On my own vehicles I would say an average of 4 hours on the one I drive often. The one that just takes up garage space and I seldom drive (and actually don't need) an hour or so.

GSKTech
Sep 22nd, 2006, 03:19 AM
I only do 2 hours approx once a week.
However it breaks dows as follows:

1 hour to completly wash and dry.
1 hour to do some other detailing item

I.E
1 week it will be the interior
next week might be clay, polish, wax 1 or 2 panels
etc...

I often try different products to see which I like best
#7, 3 step DC, etc...
(I really cant wait to see the results of the PC using #80 & #20)

I also try to watch the "ShowCarGarage - How to DVD" at least once a week.
(BTW. the rotary version is coming out soon guys ! - get out your credit cards lol)

hammer55
Sep 22nd, 2006, 04:37 AM
this included both the rotary buffer and the G100.
do you mean one of those big two handled buffers 9" or 10" the cheepys, or what ??????

Mike Phillips
Sep 22nd, 2006, 06:26 AM
do you mean one of those big two handled buffers 9" or 10" the cheepys, or what ??????

You're describing a traditional orbital buffer. Very slow moving, very safe however very ineffective at removing defects out of modern clear coats. Here's a thread that explains the differences in tools.

Rotary vs PC vs Regular Orbital Buffer (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=1395)


This is a rotary buffer with a W-7006 foam cutting pad pictures with some of our M84 Compound Power Cleaner. This combination is very aggressive and will remove serious defects out of just about any paint system but you have to be very careful around edges and high points so that you don't burn through the paint. You also have to be conscience of temperature when buffing flat areas that you don't create too much heat.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/2rotarybuffer84b-med.jpg

Here's a thread (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=218) that shows what a rotary can do

hammer55
Sep 22nd, 2006, 06:49 AM
mike I used a 6" cheapy with some 83 on a white ford as practice, one spot, and with some work that spot was free of swirl marks, was wondering if it would be safe to use on a black car, thats why I tried it, don't have a g100 yet looking but want to know which assortment of pads to get, very unknowledgeable about it

Mike Phillips
Sep 22nd, 2006, 07:39 AM
mike I used a 6" cheapy with some 83 on a white ford as practice, one spot, and with some work that spot was free of swirl marks, was wondering if it would be safe to use on a black car, thats why I tried it, don't have a g100 yet looking but want to know which assortment of pads to get, very unknowledgeable about it

It's always a good idea to start a fresh thread for questions like this versus posting them to an existing thread that's discussing a different topic.

The answer to your question however is to give it a try and seen how a small test spot looks and then go from there.

hammer55
Sep 22nd, 2006, 07:41 AM
sorry about that

gb387
Sep 22nd, 2006, 02:57 PM
depends, anywhere from 4-8 depending the steps. Typically on my truck its 8 hours.

jsfofec
Sep 22nd, 2006, 05:55 PM
I must be doing something wrong. My honda pilot took me 16 hours and my honda accord took 15. How do you guys do it so fast?

When I just wash the car, it can easily take 3 hours to do the tires, wheels, wheel wells, and the car itself. After washing and drying I wipe it down with NXT speed detailer, NXT supreme shine on the tires and NXT Tech protect on the trim. That can easily take me 3 hours.

Perfectshine
Sep 22nd, 2006, 06:45 PM
I must be doing something wrong. My honda pilot took me 16 hours and my honda accord took 15. How do you guys do it so fast?

When I just wash the car, it can easily take 3 hours to do the tires, wheels, wheel wells, and the car itself. After washing and drying I wipe it down with NXT speed detailer, NXT supreme shine on the tires and NXT Tech protect on the trim. That can easily take me 3 hours.

maybe others have more better specific brushes and meguiar products for the tire dressing which makes it quicker to do...:o

pcfxer
Sep 22nd, 2006, 08:49 PM
I'm a professional with six years of experience. So, the experience and proper tools/techniques and tricks of the trade help with doing a quick detail. However, because of MOL and my obsession with getting better results I am ONLY doing quality details and the just really depends on the vehicle. I mean, it took Mike 16 hours for that truck, that's just an example of condition/expectation rather than brute force and speed....I guess that's what "detailing" really is.

rascal
Sep 23rd, 2006, 08:18 AM
10+ hours for me. I take the washing part very seriously, so I can be on that for about four to five hours. If I use #80 or #83, I figure in another five hours w/ taping off trim. If the car is under a carport for the night, I will go over the car with NXT the next day. If I don't have that option, I will add one coat of NXT wax that same day.

kellyinkc
Sep 23rd, 2006, 08:25 AM
Usually half a day. Now when I did my black one it was 2 days.
Depends on what your goals are.

DaGonz
Sep 24th, 2006, 02:38 PM
Average time: 4 to 5 hours for an exterior detail.
Complete in and out: 6 to 7 hours.

I did do a detail on a heavily swirled wax in all the cracks and mouldings black F350 Dually that took me two days to complete!

Scottwax2 Scottwax2

MotorcycleDetailing
Sep 26th, 2006, 04:03 AM
I voted for 10+ as I do:
My wifes car
Rinse, Wash, rewash, dry 1 to 2 hours
Clay
Paint Cleaner
Mask up 1+
Speed Glaze by DA Polisher
DC polish by hand
DC Wetlook by hand
DC Carunba wax by hand
remove masking tape
do trim 2+ by hand
APC engine bay and windows
then I think about doing the interior the next day.

6 hours +
My bike
Rinse, wash, dry 1+
clay
paint cleaner
Speed Glaze
DC polish
DC Wetlook
Hand polish all my chrome 3+
I do the above once a month and the following every week
rinse, wash, rewash
DC polish
DC carunba wax
once a week on both car and bike (along with chrome polishing on the bike).
This takes me a full day to do both.

Jeepster04
Sep 26th, 2006, 02:13 PM
Last time I detailed me Jeep, it took a good 2days. I was new with the PC so it took me alittle longer than it would now.

-Washed it
-Clayed it
-DC 1
-# 7
-Thin coat of NXT
-Thin coat of #26

Cleaned my Highland floor guards, used Natural Shine on dash, swept the carpet, used Invisible glass on the windows. :xyxthumbs

Thats just the main steps, I didnt include all the small stuff. :coolgleam

RobAGD
Sep 29th, 2006, 07:21 PM
Well I voted 10 hours because I assume your refering to doing a car thats has not been maintained.

Wash, Dry, Clay, #83, #80, NXT x2

Trim Detail, tires and wheels, vacuume and wipe down leather, windows etc

-R

Tom Claessens
Oct 2nd, 2006, 12:30 AM
My own car takes about 6 hours. (small car)
Max. time I needed was about 10 hours on a volvo v70.

capitolason2
Oct 2nd, 2006, 09:29 AM
The last truck I detailed took more that 20 hours. It was a work-as-you-get-the-time detail. However, the end result was well worth the amount of time I spent on the detail.

rusty bumper
Oct 2nd, 2006, 09:52 AM
One to two days for me, usually.

ADHD
Oct 2nd, 2006, 07:26 PM
detailing always takes me a full day!! I do eveything though!! take off my wheels the whole 9!

rusty bumper
Oct 2nd, 2006, 07:57 PM
detailing always takes me a full day!! I do eveything though!! take off my wheels the whole 9!
Really?

If I did that, it would take me 3 days to finish the job. :laughing

buda
Nov 19th, 2006, 01:44 PM
The standard in the industry for the following:

Engine Clean
Wheel Clean
Jambs
Body Wash
Tar Removal
Trunk Clean & Shampoo
Complete Interior Clean & Shampoo
Dress Interior & Windows
Buff
Polish
Wax
Dress Trim & Tires
Final Detail

One man - 4 hours

Daniel Kinder
Apr 1st, 2007, 05:33 AM
Scottwax2 with washing,test spots,interior,engine bays, doublechecking everything to see if i'm happy with my work, or like some detailers stated yes even days with some special intrest cars... it's not work it's passion!!!:spot

rascal
Apr 1st, 2007, 07:18 AM
I know I replied to this already but, I have been slacking guys. I haven't detailed my car in over six months. It is covered completely in pollen, dust, bird poo and everything else. Time to get off the boat and put some "love" back into my car's finish. It will take me a full twelve hours at least.

CWM3
Apr 1st, 2007, 08:11 AM
I voted for 5 hours because that is my average time. I could probably go lower in time but I am usually in no rush, I wake up early, and just take my time.

J. A. Michaels
Apr 1st, 2007, 03:31 PM
I voted for seven. This is just a rough guesstimate. It all depends like it was said before; what are you trying to accomplish at this time.

Jbirk
Apr 3rd, 2007, 06:03 PM
I voted for 10+ as I do:
My wifes car
Rinse, Wash, rewash, dry 1 to 2 hours
Clay
Paint Cleaner
Mask up 1+
Speed Glaze by DA Polisher
DC polish by hand
DC Wetlook by hand
DC Carunba wax by hand
remove masking tape
do trim 2+ by hand
APC engine bay and windows
then I think about doing the interior the next day.

6 hours +
My bike
Rinse, wash, dry 1+
clay
paint cleaner
Speed Glaze
DC polish
DC Wetlook
Hand polish all my chrome 3+
I do the above once a month and the following every week
rinse, wash, rewash
DC polish
DC carunba wax
once a week on both car and bike (along with chrome polishing on the bike).
This takes me a full day to do both.

Just thought I would mention that drying should not take 1+ hours or 1 to 2 hours. Here is how I dry:

After washing, I get separate towels for the doors and door jams and gas cap lid and under the trunk. I get all the cracks first and use air from a can of air to get water out of the mirrors.

Now, I lightly spritz the area (panel) I am going to dry with a spray wax that is meant to be used while drying and use a chamois then immediately follow with the water magnet. This gets the entire car more than 99% dry, prevents runs, and spotting. If I miss something or do not have it all the way dry, it does not really mater because the next step for me is clay, which requires the area be wet again anyway.

If I am in a hurry and wish to clay, I just use the hose to keep the car wet to prevent spotting. I obviously work in the shade as well.

My Clay Procedure:
Meguiar's Smooth Surface Clay removed from sandwich bag and spritzed with some form of a Quick Detailer then molded into a ball and flattened out. I then set it on the plastic bag and spray 1 spray of QD, so it doesn't stick.

Now, I mix up 2 spray bottles.
1 has soapy water, which I mix up with distilled water (no minerals or chemicals/very pure) and some car wash solution such as the Gold Class, since I am not going to buy the #000. I just make it nice and week to really just make a thick, slippery water.

I then fill the other spray bottle with distilled water as well. Please understand that I found a place where I buy 2 gallons of distilled/de-ionized water for 50 cents. This makes it cheaper 10 cents cheaper per gallon than what I drink. I buy the water from a chemical supplier in my area that ships all kinds of chemicals all over the USA. They have minerals, acids, water, and all kinds of stuff. The people that work there are awesome and allow me to buy stuff directly without forcing me to pay shipping, which in the case of water would be expensive.

I spray the car and one side of the clay with the soapy solution and clay, then wipe up the mess with a microfiber. I then spray the area with the distilled water and wipe it with another towel to make sure I leave no soap behind. The cost of using this very pure bottled water is very low, since I use only about half a gallon of it while claying. The results are just as good as when using a quick detailer.

You cannot go wrong when claying if your clay is of the right type, clean (no dirt), you use it on a clean car, and you use lots of lubricating liquid (just about anything that is more slippery than water). Obviously, if you use soapy solutions, you need to rinse when done.

_________________________
Popular Time Saving Technique:

Wash the car and leave it wet.

Spray on some slippery soap and clay then rinse again and dry.

94BMW325CIS
Apr 4th, 2007, 08:10 PM
I take anywhere between 3-10 hours depending on what I do and what kind of car I'm detailing. I'm pretty new and not very fast due to my experience.

pcmark
Feb 12th, 2008, 02:23 PM
For my garaged vehicle, I'll spread it over 3 evenings.

onawrxhigh
Feb 13th, 2008, 08:41 PM
I chose over 10 hours, but it really depends on what I am working on. I have detailed 2 cars in one day that took 14 hours to complete between the 2. the first took 6 then the vette took the remaining 8. My two trucks take about 10hrs each. Most of my client's vehicle take from 8 to 12 hours to complete. This includes wash, clay, full interior, machine polish the paint, 2 coats of my lsp of choice, dress tires, clean windows, and a final wipe down.

Andrew

G Force
Feb 13th, 2008, 09:31 PM
About 8 to 10 hours and it's still not perfect

cv_soccer
Feb 13th, 2008, 09:35 PM
Even on my small car I spend almost 10 hours doing a "FULL" detail. When you consider that I do the steps below you can see how 10 hours can be spent very quickly.

1) wash, 2) dry, 3) clay, 4) clean paint, 5) evaluate, 6) test spot, 7) tape off car, 8) polish/cleaner (M80), 9) alcohol wipe down, 10) evaluate , 11) repeat #8 if needed, 12) fine polish (M07), 13) sealant (NXT 2.0), 14) The next day second coat (NXT 2.0), 15) Time for a BEER, admire your work, and watch your neighbors turn green with envy.

Thank to Mike P., Mike P., Murr1525 (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/member.php?u=1906) and many others for your advise as you had thsi all possible.

My ride months after a detail but just after a wash and UQD wipe down.
http://www.wildensten.com/GTI/583a.JPG

cv_soccer
Feb 13th, 2008, 09:36 PM
About 8 to 10 hours and it's still not perfectAre they ever perfect?

G Force
Feb 13th, 2008, 11:07 PM
Are they ever perfect?


Nice v w :xyxthumbs

It's so good trying to reach unreachable stars

christian6984
Feb 14th, 2008, 09:14 AM
As a rough guide (i have only even done small cars) 6-8 hours for a 'as near to perfect as i can do' would include.

Wash + Dry- 30mins
Vacuum - 30 mins
Clay - 1hr
Mask Plastics Off - 15 mins
PC #83 - 1-2hrs
PC #80 - 1hr
Hand GC Liquid Wax - 30 min
Dress Tyres - 15 mins
Dress Trim - 15mins

Thats roughly just over 5 hours but is flexible depending on car and how bad certain parts can be and taking short breaks in between jobs for a snack and drink.
May take a bit longer to dress interior trim and clean glass.

smokin
Feb 14th, 2008, 05:16 PM
About 3 to4hrs. to wash and wax ,clean interior of own cars. Takes 8 to 10 on customers car or boat.

Mike Phillips
Feb 15th, 2008, 04:48 PM
Too long...

;) :laughingScottwax1

cv_soccer
Feb 15th, 2008, 08:12 PM
Nice v w :xyxthumbs

It's so good trying to reach unreachable starsThank, my dealer like it also.

CAShine
Feb 15th, 2008, 09:22 PM
I take atleast 8 hours if I am detailing for someone. If I have enough sunlight it could take longer.

montanajem
Feb 28th, 2008, 11:12 PM
6 hours to 2 days, depending on vehicle.

Heatgain
Mar 8th, 2008, 04:57 PM
I chose six hours, but that's actually a minimum.

99max
Apr 8th, 2008, 07:52 PM
Back in the fall, I did wash and DCS on my Maxima and it took me about 6 hours total; but I was pleased with the results, so its worth it! :bigups

Derrick
Apr 8th, 2008, 10:59 PM
well for me it depends on what detail package im doing like my showroom usually takes about 12 to 20 hrs and then my ultimate detail takes me about 2 days. but both of those packages include compounding, polishing paint and metal (chrome, aluminum), waxing, interior, engine bay, and the ultimate i even do the undercarage but that one is mainly used for people looking to go to showcar compititions

Silverado12
Apr 10th, 2008, 04:46 PM
Depends on the car. For an average sized car, I'd say it usually takes me six hours minimum (usually eight hours if I'm not pressed for time) for a wash, clay, cleaner-polish, and wax 2x. It takes around 10 hours on a truck/SUV when there is a bunch of paint to polish. I always take my time and focus on each individual panel to get the most out of my work. Usually on a truck, I will take two days to work because I run out of sunlight, which is critical during the cleaner polish step to ensure 100% swirl removal.

Brents Classic Custom Detail
Apr 15th, 2008, 09:00 AM
Well for us it depends on the size/type of vehicle and what they want. Of course also how really dirty it is,. We try to push (if poss. and it meets our inspection process) 3- 4 vehicles in our shop per day and mabye 2 on sat. !

bookeem
Apr 24th, 2008, 06:14 AM
long as it takes...

RaskyR1
May 23rd, 2008, 06:46 AM
Well it will all depend on who the car is for and what they are looking to get out of it. I try to do dealer cars in 3 hours but the work I really enjoy doing will be 10+ hours jobs for high end customers. Scottwax2

Renny Doyle
May 23rd, 2008, 07:29 AM
Our man-hours are all over the board depending on the vehicle and the service we provide. The average retail level detail on a sedan is 4 man-hours while the average large SUV such as an H1 can be 8 man-hours.

For a show car finish or if we are doing a Barrett-Jackson car...easily double or triple those times. In 2006 we detailed a 67 Vette that sold for over $250,000.00 at the event and I spent two-days on just the paint getting it to perfection!

Great to read the lengths that people go to make it shine and I am glad I am not the only nut around!

new2detailing
Jun 16th, 2008, 01:51 PM
The easy answer is that it depends...I did a Lexus SUV and spent 4-5 hours on the interior alone (owner had three kids that trashed the interior) and 2 hours on the exterior. SUV constantly garage kept and maintained. However, I try to block out a half a day for one detail. ( I do not like to be rushed)

SHYNEMAN123
Jul 9th, 2008, 07:30 PM
The 1929 Pierce Arrow I Have In My Photos Took Me 55 Hrs Just On The Paint And Chrome.

Don't Settle For A Shine You Can Live With,wait For The One You Cant Live Without.

sniper
Jul 9th, 2008, 09:06 PM
8 hours to detail (4 inside/4outside)c2000,105,83x2,7x2,26 and 20 outside.

b2bomber
Aug 4th, 2008, 11:04 AM
over 10 hours -- primarily because I take my time... gives me reason to enjoy the two days (first 8 hours on the first day and the rest of the following day) of just "peace and quiet". :-D and more reason to have soda. :-D wash, soda, clay, soda, cleaner, soda, etc. etc. hehehe.

mustang50
Aug 12th, 2008, 04:33 AM
Close to 12 hours for clean, clay, polish, wax, engine detail, and 2 rims and wheel wells. About 14 hours total if you include the other 2 rims and wheel wells

http://i154.photobucket.com/albums/s241/mygt500_album/ctmpphpVS3KCA.jpg

littlejim82
Sep 19th, 2008, 05:57 PM
that truck is cool




EDITED FOR NON-FAMILY FRIENDLY CONTENT-Andy M.

GOHEMI
Oct 25th, 2008, 07:02 AM
I used the Meguiar's DeepCrystal 3 Step system, and the Porter Cable 7424 DA polisher on my 2006 Dodge Charger Daytona R/T (with many body decals and groves and gaps that need to be masked first) and to do all 3 steps as directed, plus some ScratchX treatments here and there, it took me 4.5 hours, and I didn't even do the hood and front (but I did the roof!).

Very nice deep lustrous shine, though. I think it's okay to detail your car in stages. I think doing it all at once is too much work, on a car like this anyway. Since it is still in excellent condition, you can get away with breaking in down into certain sections at a time.


This is a "Meguiar's Car"! Look at the shine.

http://i223.photobucket.com/albums/dd204/GoHemi/PA180006.jpg


http://i223.photobucket.com/albums/dd204/GoHemi/PA240005.jpg

Optimum Auto Salon
Jan 6th, 2009, 06:53 PM
It all depends on the job.Could be a couple of hours could be a couple of days.

After i spray a car i have taken 50+ hours to wet sand and polish it out.

buda
Jan 6th, 2009, 07:31 PM
If you are talking about a typical used car trade in or a typical retail car that has not been particularly well maintained other than through a carwash now and then I would say 4 manhours for engine clean, wheel clean; fender edges; insect residue removal, body wash and tar removal. Complete interior clean and shampoo top to bottom, front to back, dressing, windows and fragrance. The paint a buff, polish and wax and final detail.

Regards
Bud Abraham

Carfire
Jan 6th, 2009, 07:33 PM
It depends on what I am doing, a normal wash is about 2-3 hours, clay add an hour wax and another hour. Other things take even longer

Tuck91
Jan 29th, 2009, 05:11 PM
I am extremly slow

Washing and drying my truck takes two hours because i wash:
-the body
-wheels and tires
-roof
-bed of truck
-wheelwells

then i have to dry everything i wash
-dress tires
-clean glass
-apply exterior trim protectant

thats what i usually do every time i wash

its a lot of work

MDetail
Feb 5th, 2009, 10:18 AM
Regular wash is about 2-3 hours for me (ext. and int.) but a full detail depending on the condition is 1-2 days.

Robby144
Feb 27th, 2009, 10:26 PM
I like to take my time, savor the progress and enjoy the lines of the car, that is if I am working on a friends car for free, or my own. If its a customer's car, I move and get it done.

Bunky
Feb 28th, 2009, 07:35 AM
For me drying seems to take the most time so I am going to dry using a leaf blower to see if that speeds things up. It is also the most likely time to add swirls. I end up always keeping the car wet also slows me down. I do find rinseless washing to be faster just because the wash/dry process seems more efficient.

Chesney09
Mar 23rd, 2009, 04:44 PM
A full detail of my F-150 normally takes half the day. That includes:
Wash body and scrub bed out w/Gold Class
Dry (take out and let sit in sun for 20 mins or so to soak up what I missed and look over what I need to do.)
Vacume interior
Shampoo all carpet
Clay
Tape off trim
Deep Chrystal 3 step
Topped with NXT 2.0 paste
Pull tape off
Clean Windows
Black WOW trim
Tires, Wheels, and Wheel wells.
Polish Chrome
All by hand BTW
I look to have it take longer here for the summer detail. I WILL have a DA and all the other things to add with what I already have. So looking forward to a full day plus of detailing.

MyFirstES300
Apr 21st, 2009, 08:31 PM
Because of my limitations regarding time, place and climate, I try to pick a day when of course the weather is sunny, followed by several (at least 3) days of dry/sunny weather.

Since I do not have the ability to wash my car where I live, I have to drive 45 minutes to my parents house and try to cram into one day everything I aim to accomplish. In many cases, I have to rely on AIO's to help with the time constraints.

I do not have the luxury of a garage, otherwise, I'd split everything up over a two day period.

Therefore, I spend an average of 5-6 hours each time I detail any of my vehicles.

sleepy
Apr 22nd, 2009, 03:16 AM
I put a 1/2 a day but if I am really getting in and doing the claying and m80 #7 and then gold class. Then the interior, it will take 2-3 days. The funny stares that I get from my neighbors is worth it when they see how good the car comes out.

Autobrite
Oct 11th, 2009, 05:11 PM
Usually takes between 8-10 hours for me. I have had a couple that have taken me 14 and 15 hours. Just depends the shape and size of the vehicle.

FIREBOY
Nov 26th, 2009, 01:02 PM
About 4 hours for me.Depends on how dirty or condition of the paint

Innovative Detailing
Nov 26th, 2009, 07:26 PM
Anywhere from 2-4 hours depending on manpower, vehicle size and overall condition.....

Also depending on what type of service the vehicle may need.....an example would be a "Concours Detail" which could take anywhere from 10-16 hrs or even more depending on the clients expectations and vehicle's needs.

Garage Troll
Nov 29th, 2009, 07:00 AM
I make molasses look like a Ford GT (LOL. That could be a good c/t). To do a full exterior only (part by DA, part by hand) it takes me about 16-18 hours. I am very picky (maybe too much so) but I just take my time and enjoy.

agp56
Mar 1st, 2010, 08:19 PM
Where is the box that says "Until the job is done" - Just wondering......

ClearlyCoated
Apr 24th, 2010, 08:37 PM
Where is the box that says "Until the job is done" - Just wondering......+1.

I just finished polishing a 2000 Miata for a friend and co-worker. I underestimated the time it would take me to polish the Miata (I figured, little car, no roof, 6 hours tops). 6 hours was on the money - for day 1 last Saturday. The paint was in horrible condition. I spent 2-3 hours alone claying the paint. The next three hours was spent just correcting the hood.

I returned today to finish the job and spent another 7 hours for heavy compounding and polishing the rest of the car. It looks light years better, but the paint was really hammered and will need rotary work to get rid of numerous scratches covering every panel. The owner didn't want to go that route because she's selling it anyway (although she's now reconsidering because her Miata hasn't looked this good in years). :dp:

FinalTouchDetail
Aug 5th, 2010, 11:27 AM
My TYPICAL detail takes between 5 and 6 hours for Wash, Clay, Single Stage Machine Polish (usually with D151), Wax/Sealant, exterior wipedown and dressing and finish with basic interior vacuum and wipedown.

If I do multiple steps of polishing for serious defect removal or refining the finish it can easily go over 8 hours.

Bill Davidson
Aug 5th, 2010, 12:24 PM
It depends on whether or not, it's my own vehicle. My own vehicles get constant detailing. Seldom will I do everything at once. So 1-3 hours on my personal vehicles.

On customers/friends vehicles, I spend all day. I tell them, I need all day. I charge them $200 and get done what I can in a day (8-10 hours with breaks). I actually ask them to bring it to me as clean as possible, because there is only so much I can do in a day. Why waste their money doing things that they could do on their own.

I realize my methods are unusual, but it makes sense to my friends.

buda
Aug 5th, 2010, 03:16 PM
Shawn

What price do you charge for a 5 to 6 hour detail?

What price do you charge for an 8 hour detail?

Thank you

Bud Abraham

FinalTouchDetail
Aug 5th, 2010, 03:25 PM
A 5-6 hour detail is usually in the range of 135-175 depending on the size of the vehicle and like I said, it includes wash (including wheels, wheel wells, door jambs and tires), clay (paint, headlights and windhsield), single stage machine polish with D151 which can take out about 50%-70% of the swirls and leaves it's own sealant, an optional LSP if the customer wants to top the 151 sealant with a carnauba for $15 extra, and then a final wipedown with either a spray sealant or detail spray while also dressing the tires, wheel wells and trim.

It also includes a basic interior detail with vacuum and interior wipedown/dressing.

For my multiple step polishings which start with a compound and then are followed with a finishing polish pricing starts at $195 and includes everything I listed above plus an additional machine polishing step as well as a glaze applied before the sealant/wax. $195 would be for a small vehicle though and pricing goes up to 300+ for and SUV/Large Truck. I would say most cars fall into the 220-240 range.

buda
Aug 5th, 2010, 07:59 PM
Shawn for the benefit of others on the forum I am going to share our private emails about pricing.

As mentioned to Shawn if you divide the hours he sites to do a detail and the prices he charges his hourly rates are from $22 an hour to about $39 an hour.

For a legitimate business paying all the appropriate fees, etc and making a good wage plus benefits he would get at a job: paid vacation & sick leave; health care benefits; retirement those hourly rates are too low in my experience.

First and foremost the market does not dictate your prices your costs of operation dictate your price and if your prices are too high then you have to lower your operational costs.

Do you all think that making $195 for 8 hours work gross is a fair wage for the day? That is not net that he puts in his pocket that is before materials, costs of operation, etc.

Jsut some thoughts to consider.

Bill Davidson
Aug 5th, 2010, 08:08 PM
Do you all think that making $195 for 8 hours work gross is a fair wage for the day? That is not net that he puts in his pocket that is before materials, costs of operation, etc.

Jsut some thoughts to consider.

Absolutely not. It's a horrible wage if you factor in expenses. Sad thing is that's twice as much as some guys are charging.

Working at McDonalds with full benefits and no expenses would equate to more. The bank would even be quicker to give you a loan.

FinalTouchDetail
Aug 6th, 2010, 04:13 AM
I agree that $195 for 8 hours of work is too little...it's a good thing I've literally never made that amount for that much work, ha ha.

Buda has taken average starting prices/times and assumed that my lowest starting price is what is attached to my lowest quoted average amount of time spent and that simply isn't the case. He also fails to realize that a starting price does not include the added things that decent detailers upsell during their details which take almost literally the same amount of time to complete.

When I do machine polishing work I generally charge with the intent of completing the work making in the range of ~$30 an hour. Some cars go quicker than others and some go slower.

Markets also differ GREATLY from one area to another. Living expenses in Houston, Tx are some of the lowest in the country. The money made here can easily be equated to making twice as much in other areas of the country. Just for a few quick comparisons... my charging around 30 dollars an hour would equate to about 70 in San Francisco, 55 in New York, 53 in boston, 37 in Chicago, 50 in LA, ....you get the picture by now, ha ha.

My suggestion for everyone detailing for profit is to do the necessary market research for the area and price according to what you want to make to be comfortable. This can vary greatly due to your personal expenses into the detailing game (my expenses are almost non-existant other than product, which I buy in bulk from a manufacturer rather than a retailer for the most part and always buy concentrated formulas when possible).

Do not go online to compare pricing with others on online communities because at best that's just a shot in the dark at what you should be charging.

FinalTouchDetail
Aug 6th, 2010, 04:22 AM
Ah, and to also add on to "price according to what you want to make"...

I don't feed my family from detailing. I "technically" have three jobs right now. One is a full-time M-F corporate position, the other is managing 20 rental properties that my parents own, and detailing is what I do on the weekends and in my free time because I am passionate about doing it and love it.

But I assure you that I am certainly not giving my work away when compared to the other detailers in the area. I am very competitive because I maintain an essentially non-existant overhead and very low general expenses, but I am generally right in the middle of the pack on pricing.

sunday joe
Aug 9th, 2010, 07:12 PM
I don't really detail like most of you do. I just like to have the car shiny. I might do a little each day for about three days. It's seldom I finish it in one day. I do it all by hand. I have a 6" rotary buffer that cost about $12.00 about ten years ago. I rarely use it. Present car is a 2000 Grand Prix I've had for nine years. It has 102,000 Km on it now. It had 42,000 Km on it when I bought it. It's parked in the garage most of the time.

SATracker
Aug 29th, 2010, 12:34 PM
The last car I did outside of the family was my neighbor's BMW; it took about 24 hours. It had never been detailed, took some serious work, but I also did the wheels (which were disastrous) & engine (which was not disastrous but real close). He was on vacation for 3 weeks, gave me the keys to the car, and I didn't work at a very quick pace; I took the time to learn as much as I could about BMW detailing.

ocdetail
Oct 2nd, 2010, 08:14 PM
1/2 the (work) day. Although the black '03 viper that booked my thursday will probably get ALL of my thursday.

aerogt01
Oct 5th, 2010, 03:10 PM
Usually the customers that I get won't pay for a full correction detail, so for an intermediate detail it takes me approximately 6 hours.

A full correction detail would be over the course of about 2 days, 8-12 hours each.

Albert87
Dec 20th, 2010, 09:55 AM
sometimes 5 hours!

but if its a first time car. mostly a full work day
from 8.00 till 18.00!

after that the usual 2 hours

Mine get more Care since i can do that! and ill spend 5 + hours on it!
(ofcourse customers get it to if they have the time and willing to pay for it + be Car less in that time)

:icon_bolt1

buda
Dec 20th, 2010, 10:03 AM
May I ask those of you who spend more than 3 to 4 man-hours on a car do your customers pay you $500 or more for the detail?

ProAutoImage
Jan 4th, 2011, 11:19 PM
To answer you question buda, I just returned from VA where I have a client (I live in Fl) and spent 4 days working 12 hours a day on 3 Clasic porsche's. The client bought the plain ticket and paid my lodging and I charged them $4k for the 3 cars and 48 hours of work..

buda
Jan 4th, 2011, 11:33 PM
That is wonderful to be able to get that kind of money to service a customer's vehicle.

Can you tell us exactly what you do to 3 cars that merits $4,000?

Certainly it is more than a wash; engine and wheel clean; trunk clean & shampoo; interior clean & shampoo and a buff, polish and wax?

As well, I would suspect that anyone who would pay you that kind of money would have vehicles that are in pretty good condition to begin with.

Please share with us the type of work vehicles like these would require.

Thank you

bud Abraham

ProAutoImage
Jan 7th, 2011, 12:31 PM
That is wonderful to be able to get that kind of money to service a customer's vehicle.

Can you tell us exactly what you do to 3 cars that merits $4,000?

Certainly it is more than a wash; engine and wheel clean; trunk clean & shampoo; interior clean & shampoo and a buff, polish and wax?

As well, I would suspect that anyone who would pay you that kind of money would have vehicles that are in pretty good condition to begin with.

Please share with us the type of work vehicles like these would require.

Thank you

bud Abraham


Sorry to take so long to get back to you buda.. To be honest and forthright the higher class customers I have get charged more for my service but the quality of work they get is the best.. To go through the trouble of packing my equipment and flying, being away from home to do these cars the customer will pay for my time but the cars get my best products as the client insists. Adams is what I use on these cars. The owner know's Meg's and feels it a less than stellar product mearly because it can be bought at walmart.. I tryed to teach him different but he wasn't having it.. 2 of the cars are concourse d'elegance cars so they are not driven very much and are in better than new condition. The cars go through a wash like many other cars I do and get the vacuum and windows done like any other. The cars are then put on stands and the wheels removed and polished, They are wire wheels, every inch of the engine is cleaned and polished, suspension components are cleaned and polished as well as the full exhaust system. Seats and some of the int panels are removed for a better clean and treated. Paint goes through a 5 step process to remove imperfections and get the best depth and shine possible..

buda
Jan 7th, 2011, 12:38 PM
Thanks for the reply.

Suspected you do a great deal more than a normal detail.

Plus, as you say, the travel time, etc is worth money too.

I know a detailer in Florida who is flown to Canada by a customer who paid him $4,000 plus expenses to detail, not even as extensively as you do, his three black cars. He wants flawless finishes.

By the way, he uses the BUFFPRO drum polishing tool to get the flawless finish.

Are you familiar with it? If not let me know and I will send you a video

Bud ABraham

ProAutoImage
Jan 7th, 2011, 03:21 PM
never heard of the buffpro and i would like to see the vid.. i have a rotary but it never sees paint on these cars, i stick with my megs da..

buda
Jan 7th, 2011, 03:57 PM
SEND ME YOUR EMAIL buda@detailplus.com

RobFern
Feb 26th, 2011, 04:01 PM
And I thought 7.5 hours was way too long for my first time with a GG6 unit...good to know I am not the only one that takes all day...

ProAutoImage
Feb 26th, 2011, 06:50 PM
And I thought 7.5 hours was way too long for my first time with a GG6 unit...good to know I am not the only one that takes all day...

Its an art my man and 7.5 hours to completly correct paint is kinda quick for the perfectionest. When I bought my mustang I spent 2, 12 hour days correcting JUST the paint... Another full day was spent on the wheels, brake roters and engine and convt top.. 6 more hours on the int.. My cars MUST look their best as my customers expect to see my rides clean when they see them at my shop!!!

RobFern
Feb 26th, 2011, 07:32 PM
I agree with you. But for me, my other hobbies will come first. Unfortunately, this town where I am stationed ***** when it comes to detailers, stores and more. Yes, it is way in the sticks away from cities like yours.