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View Full Version : #9 vs #9 2.0 ?



xappie
Jul 5th, 2004, 05:01 PM
Hi all

I picked up some #9 on the weekend, and it works really well. Unfortunately, I was unable to get the 2.0 version... What is the difference?

Tim Lingor
Jul 5th, 2004, 05:55 PM
Hey,

Though I will have to check to make sure, but I believe that you can not get the #9 2.0 label in Canada on the 16oz bottles (but you can get it on the gallon size). So while it may have just #9 on the label, unless it is quite old, it probably has the 2.0 in it. I will try and find the answer. But do not worry, either version works great! :)

Tim

xappie
Jul 5th, 2004, 07:03 PM
Thanks for the reply... yes, it seems to work quite well!

One question - I was using light-medium pressure on my buffer, and moderately generous amounts of the polish - is that the correct technique? Do I want to avoid heating up the product/surface of the car when using #9?

Mike Phillips
Jul 5th, 2004, 07:22 PM
The #9 Swirl Remover 2.0 is a formula improvement over the #9 Swirl Remover. Both products work really well.

You want to use an ample amount of product, this means not to little, and not too much. If you use to little, you won't have enough product on the surface to do the job. If you use to much, the surface will be to slippery, or lubricated and the diminishing abrasives won't be as effective plus you'll just be wasting product.

What kind of buffer are you using?

Mike

xappie
Jul 5th, 2004, 07:59 PM
I'm using a Simoniz cordless random orbit buffer that spins at 2900 OPM. I know it's not a PC, but it was 1/3 the price and I like it. It does a good job for what I need it to do.

:)

Mike Phillips
Jul 5th, 2004, 08:32 PM
Originally posted by xappie
I'm using a Simonize cordless random orbit buffer that spins at 2900 OPM. I know it's not a PC, but it was 1/3 the price and I like it. It does a good job for what I need it to do.

:)

With that type of polisher, you'll probably want to lean towards using a little extra product and buffing for a little extra time. The larger pad will tend to soak up more product when you start out, after the pad reaches its saturation level then you'll be able to cut back on your product usage. Because it has a lager pad and oscillates at a slower speed, you'll probably want to spend a little more time on each panel to work the product into the finish and get the most cleaning and polishing action out of it.

Hope this helps...

Mike

xappie
Jul 5th, 2004, 09:46 PM
Yeah, that is exactly what I experienced. When I first got the buffer, I worked on a panel for a few minutes with the supplied polishing pad, repeated a few times and then pulled out into the sun to check it out. The swirls were less noticeable, but still there. It took me quite a bit of trial-and error to get it right, but I basically started as gently as possible and kept increasing the pressure/amount of polish/time/etc until I got the right results.

I find that about 3-5 applications to a 2' square area for about 3 mins each applicaiton (until the product is just beginning to disappear) works well. I use a microfiber towel to remove the excess, and then apply NXT.

Going good so far! I will post pics later on when I am finished the whole car. :)



:)

xappie
Jul 6th, 2004, 08:33 PM
Originally posted by Mike Phillips
With that type of polisher, you'll probably want to lean towards using a little extra product and buffing for a little extra time. The larger pad will tend to soak up more product when you start out..

I just reread your answer - the pads that came with my polisher aren't that big, they are only 4" and 6". The 4" one seems more aggressive than the 6" one, so I have been using only the 6" one.
Isn't 6" sort of the standard size?

The polisher has a velcro backing plate, so I can actually attach almost any pad - but alas, Meguiars pads are not available in retail around here so I have been using the Simoniz ones. They do a good job too.