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Nick Chapman
Nov 22nd, 2006, 08:34 AM
Just something I figured out here recently. When I go to do a customers car, I like to make sure all of my bottles are full and ready to use.

When I went to refil my diluted products(APC, Hyper Dressing, etc...), I was wasting so much because I had to use the actual spray bottle to get the dilution ratio correct.

I went down to my local auto paint supply store and got a few of their measuring cups for paint mixing(they were free). It has different dillution rations marked on the side, so you can mix your water/product up in the cup, then add it to your spray bottle.


Not sure if this has already been posted before, but just adding things that have helped me.

Nick

BlueZero
Nov 22nd, 2006, 09:07 AM
Great idea. I was at the paint store the other day looking at those cups. They had all different kinds, they were $0.25 - $4. I'm going to pick some up today. This past weekend I was trying to figure out how much to add to my apc bottle, I ended up dumping it out and starting over. There was only about an inch in the bottom. Beats trying to do all the math. :xyxthumbs

Nappers
Dec 4th, 2006, 09:30 AM
Or...you could save an old gallon of the stuff and pre-mix your solution and make a gallon at a time, used to do that with antifreeze, simple green etc at home, just make sure you mark it (1:4 etc) on the bottle.

Thats what I'm going to do anyway, I hate starting a detail with empty bottles.

Aaron

RCBuddha
Dec 4th, 2006, 07:08 PM
Or...you could save an old gallon of the stuff and pre-mix your solution and make a gallon at a time, used to do that with antifreeze, simple green etc at home, just make sure you mark it (1:4 etc) on the bottle.

Thats what I'm going to do anyway, I hate starting a detail with empty bottles.

Aaron

Aaron has it right, I keep jugs like these:

http://www.containerstore.com/MEDIA/ProductCatalog/87066/SlimlineFridgeJug_xl.jpg

with Diluted product so all I have to do is go to my detailing closet and pour out from the spout.

Nappers
Dec 5th, 2006, 11:06 AM
Those are great bottles, I usually used an old bottle left over and mark it. but I will get some of those.

I plan on using Distilled water (ours is pastureized, really-MOO, MOO) as it's cheap and I don't think when they manufacture this stuff that they use tap water outside and put a lid on it and sell it, proably purified water.

Great bottles.

Aaron

deadlock32
Dec 5th, 2006, 02:34 PM
Those are great bottles, I usually used an old bottle left over and mark it. but I will get some of those.

I plan on using Distilled water (ours is pastureized, really-MOO, MOO) as it's cheap and I don't think when they manufacture this stuff that they use tap water outside and put a lid on it and sell it, proably purified water.

Great bottles.

Aaron

careful distilled water left out to the air over time can become lightly acidic.

"Distilled water is an active absorber and when it comes into contact with air, it absorbs carbon dioxide, making it acidic. The more distilled water a person drinks, the higher the body acidity becomes. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, "Distilled water, being essentially mineral-free, is very aggressive, in that it tends to dissolve substances with which it is in contact. Notably, carbon dioxide from the air is rapidly absorbed, making the water acidic and even more aggressive. Many metals are dissolved by distilled water.""

Nappers
Dec 5th, 2006, 03:39 PM
careful distilled water left out to the air over time can become lightly acidic.

"Distilled water is an active absorber and when it comes into contact with air, it absorbs carbon dioxide, making it acidic. The more distilled water a person drinks, the higher the body acidity becomes. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, "Distilled water, being essentially mineral-free, is very aggressive, in that it tends to dissolve substances with which it is in contact. Notably, carbon dioxide from the air is rapidly absorbed, making the water acidic and even more aggressive. Many metals are dissolved by distilled water.""


So...in other words, just use good ol' tap water? My kitchen sink is filtered so I'll just use that when the time comes when I buy that stuff.

Thanks

Aaron