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Scott
Feb 12th, 2007, 10:24 AM
Just wondering what to use to remove scratches from door panels and other plastic trim pieces such as in the trunk that get scratched up. Would ScratchX work on this at all? I know it is for the exterrior, but I do not know what else to try. Is there an interrior version of ScratchX? HELP!

MDetail
Feb 12th, 2007, 10:46 AM
I am guessing that you are going to be working by hand. I don't have time to search, but I remeber seeing after about 5 applications of Scratch X by hand, that some decent sized scracthes were removed from a vehicle. Remember this is working by hand, if you were working by PC, the defects would be easier to remove. On your interior, do you have scuffs?

cornflake_81
Feb 12th, 2007, 11:26 AM
If the panels & trim are smooth, I'd suggest PlastX. However if they're textured, I'm not sure what can be done for them. I'm sure someone more experienced with this will chime in....

MDetail
Feb 12th, 2007, 11:28 AM
I guess I need to read the whole thing next time :)

Scott
Feb 12th, 2007, 11:59 AM
I will have to take a look at PlastX - I didn't know there was such a thing? These are small scuffs/scratches on the lower door pannel where your shoe hits on the way in/out. I also have some small scratches in the trunk trim that I would like to remove. The trim is black so these really show up. I have tried a couple of cleaners, but they do no good.

Murr1525
Feb 12th, 2007, 12:40 PM
That sort of plastic isnt something you can usualy remove swirls from very well. Dressings can sometimes hide them a bit.

tguil
Feb 12th, 2007, 05:54 PM
That sort of plastic isnt something you can usualy remove swirls from very well. Dressings can sometimes hide them a bit.

I agree. Scratches in hard plastic are forever. The best that you can hope to do is to mask them a bit.

Tom :cool:

MaxImage
Feb 13th, 2007, 12:58 AM
These are small scuffs/scratches on the lower door pannel where your shoe hits on the way in/out.

Depending on the severity of these scuffs/scratches, the scuffs can usually be removed. More often than not, the scuffs are the result of your shoe's sole material being left behind on the door panel itself. Therefore, APC and either a soft bristled toothbrush or a medium-stiffness paintbrush would do the trick. Spray some APC on the affected area and with small circular motions under light to moderate pressure (all interior plastics are of different hardnesses, and their suseptibility to scratching also differs), the scuffs should disappear. It make take a couple of passes, or a couple of "rounds" of this process for the scuff to disappear. Do a TEST SPOT in an inconspicuous location first to see whether discoloration of the plastic and/or scratching will occur.

Sometimes merely a damp cloth and some elbow grease works great too!

Scott
Feb 13th, 2007, 09:56 AM
I hadn't thought of using a soft brush. I will give that a try!

Mike Phillips
Feb 13th, 2007, 10:00 AM
This question is one of the reasons we wrote this article,


What it means to remove a scratch out of anything... (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=7228)


"Some materials and/or surface coatings don't lend themselves well to being abraded"


In order to remove a scratch out of anything, metal, plastic glass, paint, etc. You must remove material around the scratch until the surface is level or equal to the lowest depths of the scratch or scratches.

The below diagram if for paint, the the same thing applies to just about an surface material or coating.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/2scratchesinpaint.jpg

In essences, you don't really remove a scratch, you remove material around a scratch.

Then the big question is, is the material or coating workable, as in can you abrade small particles of it and leave behind an original looking surface. For example, some things you can abrade, (remove the scratch), but you can never completely remove all of your abrading marks, thus you can't really fix the problem, all you can do is exchange one set of scratches of a different set of scratches.

The next questions is, how thick is the surface material you're working on or the coating. You are limited to what you can do by the thickness of these to things, (surface coating or surface material), and whether or not this surface is workable.

Sometimes you don't know what you can so until you try. It's always a good idea to test your choice of products, applicator materials and application process, (By hand or by machine), to an inconspicuous area. If you cannot make a small area look good with your product, applicator and process, you will not be able to make the entire surface look good. It's always a good idea to test first and error on the side of caution, versus make a mistake you cannot undo.

nighthawk06Si
Feb 24th, 2007, 03:42 PM
hey mike, i remember asking that at the 8thcivic.com meguiars meet and you gave us this bottle called scuff remover... is meguiars not producing that anymore? Cause last time i saw that at work, it did the trick removing the scuffs out of door panels made by shoes and such.

Scott
Feb 27th, 2007, 10:29 AM
I tried using a soft brush, but that didn't seemd to do a thing. I bought some NXT interior treatment this weekend. If/when it ever warms up I will give it a try. Very disappointing in a 2006 vehicle with only 15K miles to have these kinds of scuffs/scratches on the door panels!

Mike Phillips
Feb 27th, 2007, 10:42 AM
Very disappointing in a 2006 vehicle with only 15K miles to have these kinds of scuffs/scratches on the door panels!



How did they get there?

Scott
Feb 27th, 2007, 10:47 AM
They were there when I bought it. I really thought that I could get them out, somehow! I hope the NXT will cover them some. If it gets up in the 50's this weekend, I will probably give it a try in the garage and see if it helps cover them up. I didn't really look at the bottle too close, but I assume that it has some sort of cleaning agent that might do the trick.

Mike Phillips
Feb 27th, 2007, 11:05 AM
Just to clarify, what exactly is the material you're working on?

Plastic? As is pebble textured plastic? (rigid)
Vinyl? As in a vinyl covered panel? (soft and flexible)
Paint? Like your car's paint but on the inside, lower portion of the door

Scott
Feb 27th, 2007, 11:07 AM
I would say that it is a textured plastic. It is on the lower third of the door panels.

Mike Phillips
Feb 27th, 2007, 11:23 AM
I would say that it is a textured plastic. It is on the lower third of the door panels.

Okay, now were concrete on this.


What is the specific problem? Choose one that best describes the problem you're hoping to fix.


A) There are physical scuffs and scratches in the plastic, as in places where plastic is missing and the texture of the plastic has been physically changed.

B) There are visual scuffs and mars on the textured plastic but the plastic isn't harmed in any way. For example, someone's black shoe heel has rubbed against the pebble textured plastic and transferred blackness onto the textured plastic.

johnyB
Feb 27th, 2007, 11:52 AM
If its a scuff i dont think you could fix it without heat and if its textured good luck with makeing it look good :laughing . But if its a skid mark your going to have to try to remove whatever was transferd to the panel (rubber from your shoe) off without removeing the material under it. I personly use a pencil eraser (soft rubber) with solvent, spray the mark and erase it and thts only on non painted or dyed top surface. i also have used heavy cut compound with a microfiber cloth and it worked great just put a cloth over your finger put a real small amount on the tip and rub out the mark. again thts if its not a painted or dyed surface. then clean it with your cleaner then use a protectant to return the gloss. good luck. ( opps i steped away from the pc while writing this reply and when i finished i just noticed i posted mid conversation and after a few posts sry for interupting)

Mike Phillips
Feb 27th, 2007, 12:04 PM
Just spoke with Scott on the phone it the problem is

B) There are visual scuffs and mars on the textured plastic but the plastic isn't harmed in any way. For example, someone's black shoe heel has rubbed against the pebble textured plastic and transferred blackness onto the textured plastic.



He's already tried Goo Gone and Simple Green and neither had any effect.

We recommended he give some M39 a try with a stiff bristle nylon brush, we've seen this product perform miracles over the decades.

:)

audioguy99
Feb 28th, 2007, 08:18 AM
In some extreme cases where a stiff bristle brush and APC wouldn't work, I have used a very small amount of Body Solvent (Detailer Line) on a cloth. That has worked well at "breaking down" the transferred material without damaging the color of the plastic. Of course, I wouldn't use it over large areas and it's probably not recommended for interior use at all (Mike??).

Just as an FYI for extreme cases or where the plastic has been cut/scratched, I recently used some very fine steel wool to lightly abrade the area and then dressed it (See Pics). I had a problem with it turning white after a chemical was applied, but I'm sure this process would level at least light scratches or cuts.

Anytime you sand/abrade interior plastic you will not be able to restore the sheen/coating so do it will great discernment. Some places look better simply left alone. There are some plastic/vinyl repair kits, but I don't know how well they work.

Jonathan

Before:

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/500/medium/Copy_of_100_0233.jpg

After VF Steel Wool & Dressing:

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/500/medium/Copy_of_100_0235.jpg

Mike Phillips
Feb 28th, 2007, 12:38 PM
In some extreme cases where a stiff bristle brush and APC wouldn't work, I have used a very small amount of Body Solvent (Detailer Line) on a cloth.

That has worked well at "breaking down" the transferred material without damaging the color of the plastic. Of course, I wouldn't use it over large areas and it's probably not recommended for interior use at all (Mike??).



Before we would recommend using Body Sovent for use on interior surfaces we would recommend M39 or APC

HagFan
Feb 28th, 2007, 01:08 PM
I know the hardwood floor guys recommend using mineral spirits to clean about everything. It won’t hurt cured plastic, e.g. polyurethane. Yet it’s good at breaking down petroleum based substances, e.g. paint, shoe polish, etc. That, plus audioguy99’s suggestion of a fine steel wool might just do it.

BTW: My new Civic has less than 600 miles on it an I noticed that I’m leaving some scuffs there. I try cleaning them off and let you know how it goes. Hopefully, they are light and fresh enough that #40 will do the trick.

cnfowler
Mar 1st, 2007, 07:11 AM
I've had good results with a Mr. Clean Magic Eraser. My patrol cars gets these scuffs all the time due to exiting the vehicle a million times a day. Mr. Clean has always taken care of them and it is quick and easy. Just a thought.

golftango
Mar 1st, 2007, 07:44 AM
My VW really had issues with scuff marks and the light beige lower door panel. I used a white rubber eraser and it worked wonders. I've also heard the Mr. Clean Magic Eraser works well too.

HagFan
Mar 1st, 2007, 08:21 AM
I'm a total neophyte here, but the erasers have me wonding if clay would work for this; in case you don't have an eraser. The other day I was reading here where someone discovered, to their amazement, that clay worked wonders on glass-- truck windshield.

I've used the pink erasers to remove oxidation from stainless steel and other metals.

I hope the Mr. Clean Eraser works, so I can transfer responsibility for the task to my better half.:D

Scott
Mar 12th, 2007, 09:18 AM
This weekend I tried some NXT Generation Tech Protectant and it did seem to eliminate some of the scuffs/scratches. It has more shine than I would really prefer, but I didn't take time to wipe it off after I put it on. I may try to do that tonight - temps nearing 70 finally! All in all, I was happy with the result.