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View Full Version : Tips & Techniques for using the G110, G100, G220 and the PC Dual Action Polisher



Mike Phillips
Dec 21st, 2007, 10:53 AM
Tips & Techniques for using the G110, G100, G220 and the PC Dual Action Polisher (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=20874)
(These are all similar tools)

After teaching hundreds of classes here at Meguiar's, there are some common mistakes most people make when trying to remove swirls and scratches with a dual action polisher. Most of them have to do with technique.




Here's a list of the most common problems
Trying to work too large of an area at one time.
Move the polisher too fast over the surface.
Too low of speed setting for removing swirls.
Too little pressure on the head of the unit.
Too much pressure on the head of the unit so the pad quits rotating.
Not keeping the pad flat while working your product.
Too much product, too little product.
Not cleaning the pad often enough.
Here's a list of the solutions in matching order,
Shrink your work area down, the harder the paint the smaller the area you can work. The average area should be and average of about 16" by 16" up to 20" by 20" or so. You have to do some experimenting, (called a Test Spot), to find out how easy or how hard the defects are coming out of your car's paint system and then adjust your work area to the results of your Test Spot.
For removing defects out of the paint you want to use what we call a Slow Arm Speed. It's really easy to move the polisher too quickly because the sound of the motor spinning fast has a psychological effect to for some reason want to make people move the polisher fast. Also the way most people think is that, "If I move the polisher quickly, I'll get done faster", but it doesn't work that way.
When first starting out many people are scared of burning or swirling their paint, so they take the safe route of running the polisher at too low of a speed setting, again... this won't work. The action of the polisher is already g-e-n-t-l-e, you need the speed and specifically the pad rotating over the paint as well as the combination of time, (slow arm speed), together with the diminishing abrasives, the foam type, and the pressure to remove small particles of paint which is how your remove below surface defects like swirls or scratches. It's a leveling process that's somewhat difficult because the tool is safe/gentle while in most cases, modern clear coat paints are harder than traditional single stage paints and this makes them hard to work on. This is also why people get frustrated, they don't understand paint technology, all they know is their paint swirls easy and getting the swirls out is difficult and thus frustrating.
For the same reason as stated in #3, people are scared, or perhaps a better word is apprehensive, to apply too much pressure and the result of too little pressure is no paint is removed thus no swirls are removed.
Just the opposite of item #4, people think that by pushing harder on the polisher they can work faster and be more aggressive, but the truth is the clutch in the tool is a safety mechanism to prevent burning and will cause the pad to stop rotating, thus less cleaning or abrading action and once in a while this will lead a person to then post on the forum something like this, "Hey my pad doesn't rotate". There needs to be a balance of enough pressure to remove defects and keep the pad rotating but yet not too much pressure as to stop the rotating action. This balance is affected by a lot of things, things like type of chemical, some chemicals provide more lubrication and the pad will spin easier, curved surfaces or any raise in body lines will tend to stop the pad from rotating. This is where experience on how to address these areas comes into play or you do the best you can and move on. It's not a perfect tool, nor a perfect system, but it's almost always better than working/cleaning by hand.
Applying pressure in such a way as to put too much pressure to one side of the pad will cause it to stop rotating and thus decrease cleaning ability.
Too much product over lubricates the surface and this won't allow the diminishing abrasives to do their job plus it will increase the potential for messy splatter as well as cause pad saturation. Too little product will keep the pad from rotating due to no lubrication and there won't be enough diminishing abrasives to do any work. Again it's a balance that comes with experience, or another way of saying this would be it's a balance that comes with hours of buffing out a car to learn what to do and what not to do. Information like what you're reading here is just an edge to decrease your learning curve. Hope this is helping.
Most people don't clean their pad often enough and most of the time the reason for this is because they don't know they're supposed to clean their pad often and they don't know how to clean their pad. Again, that's why this forum is here to help you with both of these things. You should clean your pad after every application of product or every other application of product, your choice, most of the time cleaning your pad after every other application of product works pretty well. It enables you to work clean and enables the foam pad, the polisher and the next application of fresh product too all work effectively. How to clean your pad will be addressed below sooner versus later, but not at the time of this posting. (Sorry, I'm behind a keyboard, not a video camera
The first 4 are the most common. Can't tell you how many times we hear a comment like this from someone in the garage after demonstrating the correct technique

"That's what I'm doing wrong"


The dual action polisher is a gentle tool, that's why people like it. People are afraid of machines because they're worried they're going to either instill swirls or burn through the paint. When they learn that this is pretty hard to do with this machine, so after enough research or after watching a demonstration they learn to trust it and try it.

Summary: People like the dual action polisher because it's oscillating action is safe and gentle to the surface.

Now follow me on this...
For the same reason people love the dual action polisher, (it's safe and gentle), a segment of people get frustrated with it because it won't remove all defects all the time. It won't tackle serious or deep defects quickly and easily. It won't always work on really hard paints. So for the same reason people love this tool, they also hate it, they just don't know why. Maybe after reading this post they will understand.


This is the reason this thread is so widely read and you can learn a lot from it if you'll only take the time to read through it.

PC + 83 not "Cutting" it! - The Limits of the Dual Action Polisher (http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=3056)


Even the pictures of the paint on the white truck on the first page and the story behind it are powerful and REAL (This writer took them and did the testing with both the G100/PC and the RB).

When the G100/PC with a strong cleaner/polish like M83 and our W-8006 polishing pad doesn't remove the defects to your satisfaction or within an acceptable time limit the answer is not to get more aggressive with a more aggressive pad or chemical or both, the answer is to switch to a more powerful machine like the rotary buffer and or take the car to a Pro who knows how to use a rotary buffer, or learn to live with the defects.

Scottwax2 Hope this helps...

ShowStang
Dec 27th, 2007, 09:31 AM
That was very helpful thanks Mike! I just got the G100 and was learning the techniques of it through trial and error. I did start of slower, but didn't notice a difference, went to speed 5 and moved slower and started seeing the paint shine! (painted side scoops and they look factory now thanks to the G100 and #83!)

prnsr82
Dec 27th, 2007, 08:27 PM
Mike, on the pressure issue, i was watching the DVD and it looks like one could maybe judge pressure by the black mark you put on the pad. I could see about 1 - 1.5 rotations a second is what you were applying. Just seeing if you have ever noticed that way of showing pressure or if its even accurate. Anyway just a thought.

Mike Phillips
Dec 27th, 2007, 09:57 PM
it looks like one could maybe judge pressure by the black mark you put on the pad.


You can show rotation with a black mark but not pressure.

When it comes to pressure and rotation, these aspects are really only important during what Meguiar's calls the "cleaning" step, this is the step where you are removing small amounts of paint in an effort to level the surface and in effect remove the defects. (In reality you never really remove defects, you just remove the paint surrounding them).

Big picture is this, in most cases, when you're doing the cleaning step, the step in which you're using a paint cleaner or a cleaner/polish, (and even a cleaner/wax), to remove below surface defects like swirls, scratches, or etchings, then you want and need to remove some paint. It is the leveling process that restores a smooth, flat surface.

Now here's where pad rotation comes into play, when you're trying to remove paint, the pad is going to be more effective at removing small particles of paint when the surface of the pad is moving over the surface of the paint versus just vibrating against it.

It's the combination of pad material and product together with the oscillating and rotating action of the face of the pad against the finish that abrades the paint. The rotating portion of the oscillating action of the dual action polisher is probably the most key component of all these things that determines the effectiveness of the process. Take away the rotating portion and only have the oscillating action, (which can be better thought of as simply vibrating and not really making small circles in an eccentric pattern), and the cleaning or abrading effectiveness is greatly reduced.


So regardless of what chemical and pad you're using, when you're cleaning the paint on a car you need to temper your downward pressure in such a way as to apply 'usually' as much pressure as you can while maintaining a rotating pad.

This is something you gage in real time as you're working on a car by your muscles continually altering pressure, angle, speed and direction. Having some type of hypothetical equation like this,

Step 3: Move polisher with 15 pounds of pressure over the head of the unit at 1/2" per second


Doesn't really help in the real world because there's just too many factors that will effect how well the pad will rotate such as type of chemical and curved surfaces as listed in #5 under Solutions at the top of this page in the article that started this thread.





Just seeing if you have ever noticed that way of showing pressure or if its even accurate. Anyway just a thought.

It was a good thought, but just doesn't work that way out in the garage.

:xyxthumbs

Boss_429
Dec 28th, 2007, 01:24 PM
That is a fantastic write up! :bigups:bigups

prnsr82
Dec 28th, 2007, 03:27 PM
Thought I was oh so close to cracking the age old question on pressure too... :wall: Well thanks for the great write up anyway.

Jossy92
Dec 29th, 2007, 06:50 AM
So, if pressure were to be applied which only allowed the pad to rotate (not just vibrate) at the same speed as rubbing by hand with "passion"....

.....would that go beyond the limit of properly using the machine for cleaning.

I recall the word "passion" being used with SratchX. I am trying apply the same concept to the PC.

I hesitate to post this as I am sure that actually seeing the process at its extreme is necessary.

(Pleased delete this, if the question is too far out there.)

Mike Phillips
Dec 29th, 2007, 07:47 AM
So, if pressure were to be applied which only allowed the pad to rotate (not just vibrate) at the same speed as rubbing by hand with "passion"....

.....would that go beyond the limit of properly using the machine for cleaning.



No.

But let's clear one thing up, if the pad is not rotating then it is only jiggling or vibrating on the surface. If the pad is rotating the it is also oscillating at the same time.

See the difference? It's one action versus two actions taking place as determined by pressure.




I recall the word "passion" being used with ScratchX. I am trying apply the same concept to the PC.

I hesitate to post this as I am sure that actually seeing the process at its extreme is necessary.

(Pleased delete this, if the question is too far out there.)

Seeing and hands on training is always best.

Most important thing to keep in mind when "removing defects", that's when you want to be removing paint, is to keep your work area to a small size, 12" to 18" inches or so and temper this with how easy or how hard the defects are coming out.

Most people learning the way of the DA polisher will tend to try to tackle to large of an area at one time and this will reduce the effectiveness of the process, that is after you wipe off the residue you'll still see the defects in the paint. Most people try tackling too large an area thinking this will speed up the process but in fact it will render it in-effective and if you have to re-do your work then it won't have sped up the process it will have lengthened it.

Scottwax2

Jossy92
Dec 29th, 2007, 12:45 PM
No.

But let's clear one thing up, if the pad is not rotating then it is only jiggling or vibrating ....
It's one action versus two actions taking place as determined by pressure.

Scottwax2

I think I understand conceptually. So, I will do small areas with a pure polish so as not to mess up if it goes dry while I am practicing? Then When I get the hang of the machine, I will try a cleaner and focus on the paint and learn the products.

Thank you

Jeff

(Not too much to offer in terms of knowlege, sure appreciate yours.)

miahjohn
Aug 12th, 2008, 08:17 PM
Mike
while using the DA with swirl remover 2.0 when do you stop and wipe? do i buff until all polish is gone or when there is still polish on paint? I cant find the best time to stop and wipe.

Mike Phillips
Aug 12th, 2008, 08:52 PM
Mike
while using the DA with swirl remover 2.0 when do you stop and wipe? do i buff until all polish is gone or when there is still polish on paint? I cant find the best time to stop and wipe.

Usually you would make 4 passes, 2 passes over the area in one direction and two passes in a second direction.

Like this,

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/670/PolisherPathofTravel.jpg



This is the minimum, you can continue longer and it may not help but it won't hurt, the idea being to work the product until all the diminishing abrasives have broken down but don't buff so long as you buff to a dry buff.

There should always be a wet film on the surface as you're buffing. If you buff to a dry buff you'll see dusting, sometimes gumming-up and you could start inducing micro-marring because you've buffed till you're out of lubrication on the surface.

Make sense?

Re-read the tips in the first post on the first page of this thread, these are a collection of the most common mistakes and the remedies that most people make.

:)

pumafeet10
Sep 16th, 2008, 07:44 AM
Mike, was wondering if you could tell me where the g110 was made? I am trying to find equipment made in the USA and wasn't sure the country of origin . thanks for the help

Mike Phillips
Sep 16th, 2008, 08:08 AM
Mike, was wondering if you could tell me where the g110 was made? I am trying to find equipment made in the USA and wasn't sure the country of origin . thanks for the help

Trying to keep up with your posts.... :D

Just posted an answer here,

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=21543&page=6

Here you go...





I don't think this has been posted yet, but i was curious as to where the g110 was made?
thanks for the help



The G110 and the G220 is manufactured to our specs in China. The design was all done here in-house at our Corporate Office.


:)

HK77
Oct 6th, 2008, 03:33 AM
Usually you would make 4 passes, 2 passes over the area in one direction and two passes in a second direction.

Like this,

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/670/PolisherPathofTravel.jpg



This is the minimum, you can continue longer and it may not help but it won't hurt, the idea being to work the product until all the diminishing abrasives have broken down but don't buff so long as you buff to a dry buff.

There should always be a wet film on the surface as you're buffing. If you buff to a dry buff you'll see dusting, sometimes gumming-up and you could start inducing micro-marring because you've buffed till you're out of lubrication on the surface.
:)

Hi Mike,
In my theread "DA Polisher Novice Question", Mr. "Rogue Gypsy" has answered that one pass (one complete pass) in detailing forums means one side by side pass + one upside down pass like in your third picture, right? So, as in the above Red Coloured texts, you've mentioned 4 passes (2 passes in one direction and 2 passes in other direction). So, that 4 passes means 2 passes?:confused::confused::confused: Really no intention to insult anyone and sorry for my stupidity but I'm really eager to have some result with my PC+80 and so, I follow suggestions from experts over the forum and so, I just want to make sure I understand what they're really meaning.

Also, please suggest and correct me for the following if I'm wrong. I understand that temperature, humidity and many factors vary but I just want to mean "Average". To completely break down and not over buff the following polishes and waxes,

For M80 - 2 complete passes (average)
For M83 - ?
For DC2 - 1 complete pass (quick arm movement)
For M21 2.0 - 1 complete pass (quick arm movement)

Thanks All,

Mike Phillips
Oct 6th, 2008, 06:03 AM
Hi Mike,
In my thread "DA Polisher Novice Question", Mr. "Rogue Gypsy" has answered that one pass (one complete pass) in detailing forums means one side by side pass + one upside down pass like in your third picture, right? So, as in the above Red Colored texts, you've mentioned 4 passes (2 passes in one direction and 2 passes in other direction).

So, that 4 passes means 2 passes?

:confused: :confused: :confused:



Good questions and there's a lot of confusion over this topic and how to get great results with a DA Polisher, thus this thread.... ;)


While it's true to move the polisher from one side of the panel to the other side of the panel is a single pass, in the context of buffing out a panel, your first pass is the first picture. Making a series of passes from side to side over the area you're working.

Your second pass is changing directions and making a series of passes in a different direction.

This would be two passes.

Now repeat this and that's 4 passes and in most cases the diminishing abrasives will have been broken down and you will not have gone to a dry buff.

Make sense?

:)

soupboy54
Nov 7th, 2008, 07:47 PM
I work for a car dealership that has a TON of oaks/maple/pine trees surrounding the lot. This means lot of 'tree sap' on our new vehicles. They have, to date, never done any sort of maintenance' on ther removal of this tree sap, and let it bake in all summer. Now we are looking to remove the little/deep etchings into the clearcoat finish on our new vehicles. To date, we've been using 'isopropyl alcohol' and hand rubbing to remove the majority of the spots. But---there are those that have baked into the finish. Am looking at the G110 (and pads) to help solve this problem and remove those marks. Will this unit/pads/products do the job? ANY info will be of great assistance before I decide what to do or what to buy. I current am using an old Makita 9207SPC polisher (have to start 'somewhere'---with 'something').

soupboy54

HK77
Nov 8th, 2008, 07:19 PM
Hi Mike,
I understand that for scratch/swirl removal, pad rotation is essential but how many rotation is normal or is required? For example, I use M80 with a PC speed 5 to remove some swirls and I mark the backing plate with a black dot and can see whether the pad is rotating or not. To remove paint, I also know that moderate pressure is also required. So when applied some pressure, the speed of rotation is slowed down. So, 1 complete rotation over a place before I move 1/2" is OK or not. Do I need faster speed and so, decrease some pressure? Please advise,

Next thing is when applying glazes and waxes/sealeants, is pad rotation still required? As we're moving the PC rapidly, sometimes the pad doesn't rotate and I also don't pay much attention to pad rotation when appling waxes. So, is it correct or do I still need to wait for a pad to rotate a full circle before moving?

Thanks

HK77
Nov 10th, 2008, 07:54 AM
Hi Brothers,
Why No Replies? Please help.

Thanks

Mike Phillips
Nov 10th, 2008, 08:04 AM
Hi Brothers,
Why No Replies? Please help.

Thanks

You posted this on a Saturday and here in the United States this is our weekend and many of us take the weekend off work to spend time with our family and friends and non-work related activities. That was the case for myself.

Remember, "Discussion Forums" are not meant or intended to instantaneous, that's more of the job of a telephone. With forums you post your questions and as members have time they will do their best to post a reply, that maybe shortly after you make your post or in a day or two, that's the true nature of a discussion forum.

On this forum we try to answer questions promptly Monday through Friday from 8:00am to 5:00pm Pacific Time, but after that it's on a as we can get to it basis.

Thanks for understanding.

:)


Hi Mike,
I understand that for scratch/swirl removal, pad rotation is essential but how many rotation is normal or is required?


Your making this too complicated.

Turn the polisher on and look to see if the pad is rotating, it should be rotating faster than "slowly" or "barely". If it's not then there can be a number of reasons for this which I think have already been outlined in this thread.

If you need more power then you probably need a rotary buffer and are expecting too much from a tool with a clutch.


Hi Mike,

Next thing is when applying glazes and waxes/sealants, is pad rotation still required? As we're moving the PC rapidly, sometimes the pad doesn't rotate and I also don't pay much attention to pad rotation when applying waxes. So, is it correct or do I still need to wait for a pad to rotate a full circle before moving?

Thanks

No. Doesn't hurt if the pad is required but all you're trying to do is to spread out the product.

:)

Mike Phillips
Nov 10th, 2008, 08:10 AM
I work for a car dealership that has a TON of oaks/maple/pine trees surrounding the lot. This means lot of 'tree sap' on our new vehicles. They have, to date, never done any sort of maintenance' on ther removal of this tree sap, and let it bake in all summer. Now we are looking to remove the little/deep etchings into the clearcoat finish on our new vehicles. To date, we've been using 'isopropyl alcohol' and hand rubbing to remove the majority of the spots. But---there are those that have baked into the finish. Am looking at the G110 (and pads) to help solve this problem and remove those marks. Will this unit/pads/products do the job? ANY info will be of great assistance before I decide what to do or what to buy. I current am using an old Makita 9207SPC polisher (have to start 'somewhere'---with 'something').

soupboy54

Sometimes it's better to start your own dedicated thread for a project you're working on versus tagging onto an established thread, just a tip...

I've created a thread for you and copied your post to it.


Will the G110 remove little/deep etchings into the clearcoat finish on new vehicles (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=28489)


:)

Ashton
Dec 7th, 2008, 06:35 PM
Mike:

I'm a new owner of a G110. What are the risks that I should be aware of in using this machine? In the above writeup you refer to the machine's "removing small particles of paint when the surface of the pad is moving over the surface of the paint." Doesn't paint removal ultimately create a problem? Also, can I use this machine on curves, or must I limit it to flat surfaces? Thanks.

Ashton

Mike Phillips
Dec 7th, 2008, 09:01 PM
Mike:

I'm a new owner of a G110. What are the risks that I should be aware of in using this machine? In the above writeup you refer to the machine's "removing small particles of paint when the surface of the pad is moving over the surface of the paint." Doesn't paint removal ultimately create a problem?


You only want to remove paint if you want to remove below surface defects like swirls and scratches which is explained in detail in the below thread which can be found in our Hot Topics (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=80) forum.

What it means to remove a scratch out of anything... (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=7228)


If you don't want to remove swirls and scratches and/or your car's paint is flawless and all you want to do is apply wax then it's best to stick with a soft finishing pad and a finishing wax. By doing this you won't remove any measurable amount of paint.

The only other way to make swirls and scratches go away without abrading the paint on the car is to have new paint sprayed onto the car, (get a new paint job).

Does that make sense?

:)



Also, can I use this machine on curves, or must I limit it to flat surfaces? Thanks.

Ashton


You can use it on curves but here's what happens when increased pressure is applied to just a portion of the pad surface is the clutch kicks in and the pad quits rotating which means less cleaning power at the surface level.

So "yes" you can use the DA polisher wherever the pad can make contact with paint, it's just removing swirls, and scratches from any panel that's not flat become more difficult.

If you're just trying to spread out a coat of wax over the paint then "yes" you can buff any paint that you can make contact with the face of your foam pad.

If you have specific questions about your detailing project then you might want to start a dedicated thread.

:)

MTL MX5
Dec 29th, 2008, 06:18 PM
I'm new to this forum but reading and absorbing as much as I can. I realize that this thread is over 1 year old but you got me all interested with

"How to clean your pad will be addressed below sooner versus later, but not at the time of this posting. (Sorry, I'm behind a keyboard, not a video camera..."

and I believe it still hasn't been addressed. Unless I missed it, could someone describe in a few words how to clean the pads and how often?

Mike Phillips
Dec 29th, 2008, 06:28 PM
and I believe it still hasn't been addressed. Unless I missed it, could someone describe in a few words how to clean the pads and how often?

Oh no... it's been discussed for years....

Here's a thread on how to clean your pad on the fly while you're actually in the garage working on your car,

Cleaning Your Pad On The Fly (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=21413)


Meguiar's doesn't recommend washing our traditional pads with water or in a washing machine but a lot of our forum members have a variety of ways that work for them, check this thread out for more information.

How to clean Meguiar's foam buffing pads (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=3598)


And to address the problem of cleaning pads Meguiar's has introduced washable pads, click on the pictures to learn more about each pad.

Washable 7" Soft Buff 2.0 Foam Pads
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/809/170_W7207_CuttingPad.jpg (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=28355)http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/809/170_W8207_PolishingPad.jpg (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=28354)http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/809/170_W9207_FinishingPad.jpg (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=28356)

(http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=3598)

Hope that helps...

p.s.

Since this is your first post to our forum... welcome to Meguiar's Online!

:wavey

Charcot
Jan 25th, 2009, 11:29 PM
I think I can 'tag onto' this thread as I feel it to be as on-topic as one can get. I've been in the chair now for several hours. Soaking up a lot of info (time will tell how much I actually manage to retain the first time around).

But I digress to the point. One of the things I'm been looking for is a good how-to video covering the use of the G110. In fact, I could've sworn I actually came across a link for an 'instructional dvd' on this same machine. Exactly what I was looking for. Why I didn't follow it then and there is beyond me. I'll be darned if I can locate it now!

At any rate, if someone knows what I'm referring to, I'd surely appreciate them pointing me in the right direction. Who knows, maybe it wasn't part of the forum at all, but rather the main Meguiar's site.

tnx!

akimel
Jan 26th, 2009, 10:34 AM
But I digress to the point. One of the things I'm been looking for is a good how-to video covering the use of the G110. In fact, I could've sworn I actually came across a link for an 'instructional dvd' on this same machine. Exactly what I was looking for. Why I didn't follow it then and there is beyond me. I'll be darned if I can locate it now!

This is what you want: Mike Phillip's on How to Use the PC (http://www.autodetailingsolutions.net/pcdvd.html).

It's worth every penny! Enjoy!

Charcot
Jan 26th, 2009, 07:05 PM
Yup. I'm thinking that was it. It's all over now but the waiting :) .

tnx

woblynne
Jan 27th, 2009, 10:28 AM
Hi, is this DVD available in region 2?

Mark

akimel
Jan 27th, 2009, 11:34 AM
Hi, is this DVD available in region 2?

In the UK it can be purchased from Elite Car Care (http://www.elitecarcare.co.uk/product_info.php?products_id=528&osCsid=28nnaore4kfmd11kb3snl4r7i1).

Ganesa
Apr 22nd, 2009, 09:42 AM
been reading all these threads of a DA.. just can't wait to get my g220 soon.......
too much theory is useless unless i practice it :D

gmc1500
May 1st, 2009, 12:44 AM
Does anyone know if there is an equivalent rpm rating for each of the 6 speeds for the g110?<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p>

akimel
May 1st, 2009, 05:13 AM
Check out: Dual Action Polisher Comparison Chart (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=21120)

deathspared
May 26th, 2009, 12:37 PM
Are there any changes to these techniques with the newer products like swirlx that don't need to be broken down?

xantonin
May 26th, 2009, 12:41 PM
Are there any changes to these techniques with the newer products like swirlx that don't need to be broken down?

The idea is the same in the sense that when you're done just apply very very light pressure so that it "polishes" the paint instead of cleaning it.

If I'm not mistaken, I believe the instant you push down and apply more pressure it'll start cutting more.

Other than that, the last difference is that you're done when the defects are gone, rather than being done when the product breaks down.



From my observations, when the old products broke down they became clear. With my experience with UC, if I applied very light pressure the surface started to look clear instead. If I pushed a bit harder the product showed up more and was the same color as before. Confusing to explain...

Mike Phillips
May 26th, 2009, 12:51 PM
The idea is the same in the sense that when you're done just apply very very light pressure so that it "polishes" the paint instead of cleaning it.

If I'm not mistaken, I believe the instant you push down and apply more pressure it'll start cutting more.

Other than that, the last difference is that you're done when the defects are gone, rather than being done when the product breaks down.



Correct. Good explanation. :xyxthumbs

Besides your choice of chemical, other factors include, downward pressure, pad type, arm speed, (how fast or slow you move the polisher), speed setting, time spent buffing, technique, (hold pad flat to surface).


:)