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View Full Version : How many would be interested in a clear finishing wax like 16



saturn2
Dec 24th, 2007, 03:50 PM
After reading the forum daily as well as using the products. I came to the conclusion that just maybe some of us would be interested a clear finishing top coat wax like 16. How many people would be interested in this wax. Knowing that you would have to correct the finish before using like 16.

Ryan L.
Dec 24th, 2007, 07:39 PM
I've never used #16...can you please elaborate on the "clean finishing top coat?"

Thanks
Ryan

PorscheGuy997
Dec 24th, 2007, 08:09 PM
Are you talking about a wax that dries clear?

I don't really care which color the wax dries, but I do want a protectant with the durability of #16. Although it doesn't have the look of NXT 2.0, #26, etc, I'm more interested in something that lasts longer.

Ryan L.
Dec 24th, 2007, 08:11 PM
Are you talking about a wax that dries clear?

That's what I thought as well...

saturn2
Dec 24th, 2007, 08:30 PM
I've never used #16...can you please elaborate on the "clean finishing top coat?"

Thanks
Ryan

As Mike has has said time and time again. It doesn't matter what color your paint is we all work on clear paint. (Having said that there are still some single stage painted cars out there new ones even.) The darker the wax+the more transparent the clear coat is going to be=the better the car looks.

And it's the truth But,for some people including me at times. I like switch up to a wax like 16 or P21s that's clear. Let's say you detailed your car using the five steps you washed, clayed, polished, glazed,and sealed the paint.

Then you decided that you decided that you are going to do and extra step use a Carnauba wax as a topper. But you like look of the sealant the way it is. In other words if you have a silver or white car this might be a route some people would want to take. 16 or a clear wax might make it brighter. If Megs decided to make it would be a pro wax. Since 26 is a wax without a cleaner and this would be as well.

saturn2
Dec 24th, 2007, 08:49 PM
It's all about the look. And while I agree about anything lasting longer. NXT or any sealant is it. If you want something to last use them. With the demise of 16 the use of a carnauba wax (not saying they protect) but it's becoming more and more of a look thing. Having said that somehow collnite makes a longer lasting carnauba wax and pass the VOC law thing.

What I really miss about 16 besides anything else is being a hard wax in the jar. As opposed to NXT paste wax being soft. It was easier to put a thin coat of 16 on as opposed to NXT it's something that I person would have to get used to.

Sydster
Dec 25th, 2007, 03:20 PM
What I really miss about 16 besides anything else is being a hard wax in the jar. As opposed to NXT paste wax being soft. It was easier to put a thin coat of 16 on as opposed to NXT it's something that I person would have to get used to.

:iagree: :bigups

Mike Phillips
Dec 26th, 2007, 08:25 AM
Guess I'm a little confused over the direction of this thread, but we will add this...

M16 is good for creating a high gloss finish, but so our our other waxes when used correctly. We have other waxes that will create a deeper, darker looking end-result than M16 and it is this issue that some people don't understand.

In fact most of the personalities on other forums will always try to make the case that a wax that darkens, or brings out the full color of a paint is a bad thing and they're wrong. If you have a black car, you want the blackest black you can get, not gray.

If you have a white car, you want the whitest white you can get not a dulled down version.

Waxes like NXT, M26 Gold Classe etc. are products that use much newer technology than M16, it's not that M16 is a bad wax as we know it's not, it's just that our newer waxes will do more to reveal the full richness of color of a single stage paint or they will maximize the clarity of the clear coat to reveal the color coat underneath.

Here's an article we wrote that touches on this subject...

Which LSP is better for light colors? (http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=4657)

And here's what we wrote and to date no one has ever ever made the case that what we wrote is wrong.


Quote:
<TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=6 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD class=alt2 style="BORDER-RIGHT: 1px inset; BORDER-TOP: 1px inset; BORDER-LEFT: 1px inset; BORDER-BOTTOM: 1px inset">Originally posted by Cipitio
Hi everybody,

I have a silver and a white car. I was thinking on increase my stock of Meguiar's LSP (couple of tins of #16). :D

I read a lot that NXT and #26 are awesome for dark color cars.

I want to know your opinion about the best choice on LSP for light color cars.

Thank you for your responses. </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
Hi Cipitio,

Here's the deal,

First of all, 99% of all cars being manufactured today have a clear coat, so keep in mind, most people are not working on a pigmented paint, but on clear paint. Clear paint is simply resin without color.

That said, if a car wax, or polish will make a dark or black colored paint look great, it's also making a light colored finish look great too it's just your eyes can't see the difference. This is why the best test for a product is always on dark colors and black paint specifically. The true results of a product are going to be the most apparent on black paint, whether its a single-stage finish or a clear coated finish.

The color that is the least efficient at demonstrating a difference is white paint, whether it's a single-stage, or a clear coated finish. This is why Meguiar's performs all of their testing on black paint.

What you see discussed on forums and elsewhere on the topic of some waxes being better on light colors and some waxes being better on dark colors is simply confusion.

You'll often read where someone will say,

"Brand X is great on light colors",

what is implied is that brand X doesn't make dark colors look good. If a wax or polish can't make a dark color look good, it isn't making a light color look good, your eyes just can't evaluate the difference.

The best waxes for appearance quality makes all colors look good and you can know this by whether or not the wax makes dark colors look good.

Think about it for a second, if you have two identical cars, for example two Honda Accura's. One is white with a clear coat finish and the other is black with a clear coat finish, if a wax makes the black Accura look great, knowing you're working on the same kind of paint, (a clear coat), it's reasonable to assume that it's going to make the white Accura look great, it's just you're eyes won't perceive the difference as easily as they would with the black Accura.

Conversely, if a wax doesn't make the black Accura look good, it's reasonable to assume it's not going to make the white Accura look good for the same reasons outlined above.

saturn2
Dec 26th, 2007, 12:21 PM
What I really miss about 16 besides anything else is being a hard wax in the jar. As opposed to NXT paste wax being soft. It was easier to put a thin coat of 16 on as opposed to NXT it's something that I person would have to get used to.[/QUOTE]

Mike, I was wondering where does the term hard wax come play. Is it being in the can. Or does it mean as dried on the surface it becomes hard. (which to me makes more sense) Also, could meguiars make NXT paste harder in the can if it wanted to.

565Customz
Dec 26th, 2007, 12:38 PM
i think he means that it is harder in the can...like if you push on it with your finger you have to push hard to get to the bottom where as with nxt you have a more liquid texture that you wouldn't have to push as hard on....the harder texture doesnt allow you to pick as much up and leaves a thinner coat. if its soft you pick up alot...it goes a little farther but you put on a much thicker coat.

hey mike theres a question for you in the "wash after polishing?" thread lol

Mike Phillips
Dec 26th, 2007, 01:20 PM
What I really miss about 16 besides anything else is being a hard wax in the jar. As opposed to NXT paste wax being soft. It was easier to put a thin coat of 16 on as opposed to NXT it's something that I person would have to get used to.

Using the right technique M16 is very easy to apply because it has real good gliding action as far as the wax itself goes, it needs to be applied thinly as most people have learned either by reading the forum or the hard way, (first hand experience), but it's this gliding action that helps you to spread the wax out to create the thin coating if you're focusing on the task at hand and not just slop and glop waxing the car.




Mike, I was wondering where does the term hard wax come play. Is it being in the can. Or does it mean as dried on the surface it becomes hard. (which to me makes more sense) Also, could meguiars make NXT paste harder in the can if it wanted to.

M16 is actually referred to as a Heavy Wax, don't think the term is used any more and sometimes people use the term hard wax but there's different meanings between the two terms.

First let me say I'm not a chemists and it doesn't matter too much in discussions like these because after all the talk is over and said with on the discussion side of a topic, what really counts is what you can do when you go out into your garage and work on your car.

That said, M16 is referred to as a heavy wax due to something about the molecular make-up of the wax itself, it's referred to as a hard wax because it sticks really well to clean, smooth surfaces like cleaned and polished paint and if allowed to fully dry it dries very hard. Thus you really only need to and want to apply a thin coating onto the paint because otherwise it's going to be very hard to wipe off.

Keep in mind the majority of people in the world prefer a wax that is easy to apply and easy to wipe off, so "no" don't think Meguiar's will be reformulating NXT Tech Wax 2.0 to be hard and/or hard to wipe off.

:)

565Customz
Dec 26th, 2007, 01:37 PM
well i was half right lol

saturn2
Dec 27th, 2007, 07:16 PM
Mike I was wondering what your thoughts on Optimum Opti-Seal. A spray wipe and walk away sounds fishy.

saturn2
Dec 27th, 2007, 07:38 PM
another product like opti-seal is zaino z-cs.

saturn2
Jul 5th, 2008, 11:29 AM
Using the right technique M16 is very easy to apply because it has real good gliding action as far as the wax itself goes, it needs to be applied thinly as most people have learned either by reading the forum or the hard way, (first hand experience), but it's this gliding action that helps you to spread the wax out to create the thin coating if you're focusing on the task at hand and not just slop and glop waxing the car.



M16 is actually referred to as a Heavy Wax, don't think the term is used any more and sometimes people use the term hard wax but there's different meanings between the two terms.

First let me say I'm not a chemists and it doesn't matter too much in discussions like these because after all the talk is over and said with on the discussion side of a topic, what really counts is what you can do when you go out into your garage and work on your car.

That said, M16 is referred to as a heavy wax due to something about the molecular make-up of the wax itself, it's referred to as a hard wax because it stick really well to clean, smooth surfaces like cleaned and polished paint and if allowed to fully dry it dries very hard. Thus you really only need to and want to apply a thin coating onto the paint because otherwise it's going to be very hard to wipe off.

Keep in mind the majority of people in the world prefer a wax that is easy to apply and easy to wipe off, so "no" don't think Meguiar's will be reformulating NXT Tech Wax 2.0 to be hard and/or hard to wipe off.

:)[/QUOTE]

So a wax that's hard in the can would hard to take off the car. I'm not chemist either but, maybe your right. Either way applying a thin coat of anything is best it dries faster with better removal. But it was easier learning curve with 16 as apposed to 26 and NXT paste. In the end you do want you can with what you have.

yakky
Nov 3rd, 2008, 10:05 AM
The hype around #16 never seems to die. I think most people would be dissapointed if they tried it for themselves. For me, it is glossy, but the look is rather lifeless. It has no wow factor like #26 or #21.

Tuck91
Jan 18th, 2009, 10:05 PM
I have never tried #16, maybe its not just for me

hacker-pschorr
Jun 17th, 2010, 07:14 PM
I have never tried #16, maybe its not just for me
Well, somehow I ended up with eight tins of it in my detailing cabinet. Hopefully it's everything they say it is!! :D

rfinkle2
Feb 1st, 2011, 07:12 AM
i like the way some of the "old school" waxes haze. IMO, some of the newer polymer sealants / wax hybrids never seem to dry (no matter how thin they are applied). To me, there is a rewarding feeling of wiping off a hazed wax and knowing that when you pull your car out of the garage, you are going to be looking @ a crystal clear, non streaky surface.

The old addage, "if it ain't broke, don't try to fix it" sometimes applies to detailing.