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Mike Phillips
Jan 18th, 2008, 10:36 PM
Cleaning Your Pad On The Fly (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=21413)

The question often comes up,
How do I clean my buffing pads?

Or more specifically,

How do I clean my buffing pads after they become wet or saturated with the product I'm working with?


One way is to do what we call, Cleaning your pad on the fly. This means to take and hold a clean, soft, dry terry cloth towel, hopefully a towel with a thick nap, (the little cotton loops), against the face of the pad while it's still on your polisher and then with your hand that's holding the polisher, use your finger to turn the polisher on and then move the towel around and against the face of the foam pad. This will act to cause the excess product built-up in the foam pad to move out of the pad and saturate into the terry cloth towel. Then you can place the towel down and get back to working on your car.

This is called cleaning your pad on the fly because it's quick and simple and fairly effective for what you're trying to do.


Here's Cisco from one of our recent Saturday Detailing Classes learning how to clean a pad on the fly
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/649/CleaningYourPadOntheFly.jpg


Mike Stoops Cleaning a pad on the fly
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/738/mikestoops02.jpg


As you clean your pad you'll see residue build-up on the towel.
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/797/28June0033c.jpg


Clean your pad often
Besides knowing how to clean your pad on the fly you also need to remember to clean your pad often, usually after every other application of product to the pad. That is, apply some product to your pad and work it to a section. Wipe off the spent residue and either re-clean the area or move onto a new area. After a second application of product to the pad and after you've worked it to a section, now clean your pad. This is cleaning your pad every other application of product to the pad. You can clean your pad after every application if you like too. Most people don't clean their pads often enough, so err on the side of caution. Cleaning your pad often maximizes your effectiveness and thus your speed and quality of end result.

:xyxthumbs

gioprivatemove
Jun 11th, 2008, 11:44 PM
Is it ok to clean pads with shoe polish brush?

TxRado
Jun 12th, 2008, 02:13 AM
Is it ok to clean pads with shoe polish brush?

Hey thats a great idea. Those are made out of horsehair normally right? I would think thats a perfect texture based on the length of the bristles. Anyone ever tried this?

TxRado
Jun 12th, 2008, 02:14 AM
http://www.emocs.com/brushes/brushdauber.jpg

The bottom one seems perfect for the job.

PorscheGuy997
Jun 12th, 2008, 05:47 AM
Toothbrushes work when used to clean pads while using the rotary.

I've never tried using a brush with the PC, but it doesn't sound like it would work.

Tim Lingor
Jun 12th, 2008, 06:01 AM
Toothbrushes work when used to clean pads while using the rotary.

I've never tried using a brush with the PC, but it doesn't sound like it would work.

Hey Chris,

Cleaning pads with a brush is for the rotary like you mentioned. With the rotary spinning around 1000 rpm, it is surprising how much stuff comes off of a pad from using a brush!

But as you mentioned, using the brush with the machine turned on is not for the DA. You can brush the pad once it is dry to remove dried on product. But this is done with the machine turned off. If you attempt to do this with the DA turned on, like we do with a rotary, the pad will will fly off ruining the pad. The DA's action will fling a pad a long ways!! :D

Tim

b2bomber
Jul 28th, 2008, 09:53 AM
nice tip. Thanks! one question, you seem to have specified (cotton) terry towels... can't MF towels hack it? TIA.

VoicesInMyHead
Jul 28th, 2008, 09:59 AM
...If you attempt to do this with the DA turned on, like we do with a rotary, the pad will will fly off ruining the pad. The DA's action will fling a pad a long ways!!

:woot1
Sounds like I have my next competition with kerrinjeff! Wonder what the current record for distance is.... :D

InfiniteDetail
Jul 28th, 2008, 10:05 AM
:woot1
Sounds like I have my next competition with kerrinjeff! Wonder what the current record for distance is.... :D

Bring it on, I've been training for weeks! Scottwax2Scottwax4

RacerX88
Jul 29th, 2008, 08:24 AM
This means to take and hold a clean, soft, dry terry cloth towel, hopefully a towel with a thick nap, (the little cotton loops), against the face of the pad while it's still on your polisher and then with your hand that's holding the polisher, use your finger to turn the polisher on and then move the towel around and against the face of the foam pad.

What speed should you use to clean? I imagine since your holding the DA with one hand it's pretty low?

Nappers
Jul 29th, 2008, 08:48 AM
I let her rip while on speed 5, sing at the same time and you sound like Chewbacca :D

InfiniteDetail
Jul 29th, 2008, 09:14 AM
What speed should you use to clean? I imagine since your holding the DA with one hand it's pretty low?

I clean it at whatever speed I am working at - so it's truly "cleaning on the fly". It gets cumbersome to constantly change the speed to clean the pad :D

jmitch8011
Jul 29th, 2008, 09:45 AM
has anyone did this with a flex of it not recommended? I know I can't do it with 1 hand so just trying to get some ideas or is this not an option?

jmitch8011
Jul 29th, 2008, 11:23 AM
bump

RacerX88
Jul 30th, 2008, 08:43 AM
I clean it at whatever speed I am working at - so it's truly "cleaning on the fly". It gets cumbersome to constantly change the speed to clean the pad :D

Ahh, I get now. Thanks for the clarification! :xyxthumbs

Mike Phillips
Sep 22nd, 2008, 03:39 PM
What speed should you use to clean? I imagine since your holding the DA with one hand it's pretty low?

Actually, you leave it on the speed you're using the polisher.

Cleaning your pad on the fly is about cleaning your pad quickly and getting back to work, not turning the speed down, cleaning your pad, turning your speed back up and getting back to work. I've never done experiments to see if one speed works better over another as when I'm detailing a car time is of the essence.

It takes long enough to detail a car from start to finish in one day, the idea behind cleaning your pad on the fly as the title states is to clean your pad on the fly.... and get back to work. :D

It helps to have strong hands, sorry I can't help you with that...

It also helps to have 2-3 clean, small terry cloth towels on hand for this procedure.

:)

Mike Phillips
Sep 22nd, 2008, 03:41 PM
I clean it at whatever speed I am working at - so it's truly "cleaning on the fly". It gets cumbersome to constantly change the speed to clean the pad :D

Exactamundo

(As Fonzi would say)

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n88/forgvnsinner/FONZI.jpg

:)

xantonin
Jun 21st, 2009, 03:02 PM
I must be doing this wrong.

How do you stop the terry towel from swirling when the G110 grabs it as it spins?

02zx9r
Jun 21st, 2009, 04:33 PM
What I do is apply a lot of pressure with my hand holding the towel, or I will have the towel on the bench and apply a lot of pressure to keep it from spinning around

dragonballz
Jun 21st, 2009, 05:37 PM
I noticed that the g110 stops spinning. Am i applying to much pressure to the terry towel?

ceyko
Jun 22nd, 2009, 03:52 AM
I noticed that the g110 stops spinning. Am i applying to much pressure to the terry towel?


I'm in the same boat as this guy.

xantonin
Jun 22nd, 2009, 10:08 AM
Same thing, but it's the only way to stop the towel from spinning off.

the_invisible
Jun 23rd, 2009, 09:02 PM
Hey I am new and I am glas I found this thread.

Typically I just toss out my pads and soak them in water to wash them after they have become saturated. I never knew I should be cleaning them of saturation or water.

Anyway, I see that Cisco is wearing a pair of specialized glasses. Do they help him assess the pad-cleaning process? Or are they simply for eye protection?

goldenturtle
Jul 14th, 2009, 06:27 PM
I am also a newb.. so here is my stupid question for the day... why not have a few pads and toss them in the washing machine when you are done??:dunno

Michael Stoops
Jul 15th, 2009, 07:47 AM
I noticed that the g110 stops spinning. Am i applying to much pressure to the terry towel?
No, you're doing exactly right. Remember, the G110 and other popular D/A buffers have that safety mechanism that stops the rotation when excessive pressure is applied. You need to apply a lot of pressure onto your terry towel to force the product out, and if the pad continued to spin you'd have a problem doing this! Keep in mind we are recommending this procedure ONLY for D/A buffers and not rotary buffers.

Michael Stoops
Jul 15th, 2009, 07:52 AM
I am also a newb.. so here is my stupid question for the day... why not have a few pads and toss them in the washing machine when you are done??:dunno
Stupid? Not even close - you're being logical.:D While it is good practice to clean your pad on the fly, it's also good practice to switch to a clean pad a few times while completely machine buffing a vehicle. If you have a lot of pads then this is simple.

But if you either can't afford to keep several pads on hand, or are working on a vehicle that requires more buffing time, has single stage paint that is loading up your pads, or some other situation arises that is taxing your pads, you may not have an alternative - you just need to clean your pads on the fly.

Nappers
Jul 15th, 2009, 11:25 AM
Echoing what M.S. said, when I was pad poor (and I'm not pad rich, I have a few more than I did though), I would dial my process in with the pads I had as you don't want to cross contaminate products.....

I wash the pads I used in the dial up, spin them on my rotary (get a shower) then dry them in the sun and start the car with the pad I did have. I found on a smaller car such as our Neon, 2 pads or maybe 3. Cleaning on the fly every other application at the least, I try to clean on the fly after each application but sometimes I dont.....

The pads do get saturated and you need to get a new one. I clean the pad as mentioned (using paint correction products, a good rinse is pretty much all that is needed). I would then keep going and always have a clean pad to fall back on. It's a pain in the hind end if you only have a few pads.....

When I used my rotary on a Dodge Quad cab, the pads filled up every 1/4 panel and I think I ended up using 5-6 pads (with the hood and tailgate) and was cleaning pads inbetween like crazy. that was with cleaning on the fly after every application and going through terry cloths like crazy.

Anyways.....my personal experience :D

I have like 10-12 pads now to use and don't have that cumbersome problem when I had 4 pads......

JuddGA
Aug 29th, 2009, 04:46 PM
how about wool pads? do they get loaded up too? I am using some 3" wool pads to clean my windows.

Michael Stoops
Aug 31st, 2009, 07:35 AM
Yes, wool pads load up too, and they also tend to get sort of matted down. When used on a rotary buffer we utilize a pad spur to get the dried material out, separate the fibers and "fluff up" the pad.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/500/pad_spur.jpg

Lacking a spur we've seen guys use a large screwdriver for the same purpose, although compressed air also does an excellent job. And then there's KC, who just uses his fingernails and gets a manicure in the process (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=36375). :nervous1:D

speed3blackmica
Dec 27th, 2009, 10:32 PM
the only thing that bothers me about cleaning on the fly is that the DA tends to tear up the fibers in the terry cloth and you find little strands of cotton on your pad..is this normal ?

by the way, i find that using a soft bristle tooth brush and turning the machine on helps a lot to clean off any dried product and doesnt rip apart the foam

ripple_effect
Dec 28th, 2009, 02:28 PM
nice tips. I saw that spur in one of the shops here in the Philippines and I wonder how to use that one? Do I run the spur around the wool pad or run it radially?

speed3blackmica
Jan 13th, 2010, 02:17 AM
nice tips. I saw that spur in one of the shops here in the philippines and i wonder how to use that one? Do i run the spur around the wool pad or run it radially?

bump

speed3blackmica
Jan 13th, 2010, 02:30 AM
about how long should you keep the terry cloth pressed against the pad while the g110 is on?

Michael Stoops
Jan 13th, 2010, 07:52 AM
nice tips. I saw that spur in one of the shops here in the Philippines and I wonder how to use that one? Do I run the spur around the wool pad or run it radially?
Below is a shot of Mike Pennington cleaning a wool pad with a spur. This tool should be used for cleaning wool pads only. Use a nylon brush for cleaning foam pads. In either case, the process is basically the same:

Set the machine to a fairly slow speed, perhaps 1,000 to 1,200 rpm. Brace the handle against your thigh, or set the machine on the ground, pad face up, and gently place your foot on top of the handle to steady the machine. Switch it on and bring the spur or brush into contact with the face of the pad, applying moderate pressure, and slowly move it in a straight line from the center of the pad to the outer edge and back. Repeat this a few times or until you no longer see dried product being slung off the pad. Pretty simple, really. Just make sure you've got a good hold on the buffer and have it braced well.
http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/500/medium/2009_03_21_Advanced_Class_030.jpg


about how long should you keep the terry cloth pressed against the pad while the g110 is on?
Really just a matter of a few seconds. Make sure to press the terry towel quite firmly against the pad before switching the tool on, but it does not take long at all to force excess product out of the pad.

Both of the processes above are very easy to do and should be done often while detailing a car. Both take just a tiny bit of trial and error to get the feel for them, but in no time at all they should become second nature to anyone using any sort of buffer to polish paint.

speed3blackmica
Jan 13th, 2010, 07:56 AM
Thanks Mike...I have the edge pad conditioner brush from ADS for my soft buff 2.0 foam pads for my g110v2...what is the recommonded way of using this type of brush on the foam pads ? turn the g110 upside down, turn it on, and glide the brush over the spinning pad ? i know the g110 will most likely just stop as soon as i apply pressure with the brush...your input is greatly appreciated

Michael Stoops
Jan 13th, 2010, 08:09 AM
If you're going to use a brush to clean pads on a D/A be careful! It doesn't take a lot of speed on an unsupported pad to send it flying off the tool - that oscillating action is fairly violent and will dislodge a pad pretty quickly. You can brush across the face of the pad with the tool off, or run it at a very slow speed and work up from there. Get a feel for it, take your time. There's really no right or wrong way to do this - just get the dried product off the pad.

speed3blackmica
Jan 13th, 2010, 01:26 PM
If you're going to use a brush to clean pads on a D/A be careful! It doesn't take a lot of speed on an unsupported pad to send it flying off the tool - that oscillating action is fairly violent and will dislodge a pad pretty quickly. You can brush across the face of the pad with the tool off, or run it at a very slow speed and work up from there. Get a feel for it, take your time. There's really no right or wrong way to do this - just get the dried product off the pad.


hmmm..interesting..

ive never had the pad fly off...i usually just turn the DA upside down, place it on my thigh and while its spinning, i lightly glide the nylon bristles over the pad, starting from center, moving to the right till i get to the edge...but i never had it fly off ? i always make sure the pad is on all the way, am i supposed to give moderate pressure ? im afraid of the bristles tearing into the foam

Michael Stoops
Jan 13th, 2010, 01:31 PM
If you've never had a pad fly off your D/A when doing this, then you are doing it right!!! One of these days take an old pad and switch the D/A on at speed 5 - see how far you can make the pad go! Yeah, it will go. But at a slower speed, and with the brush on it, you're fine. As you well know.

Unless your brush is crazy stiff, and you're being really aggressive with it, you needn't worry about damaging the pad.

speed3blackmica
Jan 13th, 2010, 01:36 PM
If you've never had a pad fly off your D/A when doing this, then you are doing it right!!! One of these days take an old pad and switch the D/A on at speed 5 - see how far you can make the pad go! Yeah, it will go. But at a slower speed, and with the brush on it, you're fine. As you well know.

Unless your brush is crazy stiff, and you're being really aggressive with it, you needn't worry about damaging the pad.

hmm..this is so weird lol ive even tried it on speed 5, although 3 is much more comfortable for me....im using the edge pad conditioning brush..its bristles are step up stiffer from a toothbrush...i just get so worried if i put too much pressure into the foam i will tear up the pad, but i also feel as if im not putting enough...ill give it a shot with an old pad and see exactly how much pressure i can apply to the pad before i hit the danger zone..thanks for the info mike

Michael Stoops
Jan 13th, 2010, 01:45 PM
Hang on there bud!! You're doing it correctly at speed 3 when cleaning the pad. Don't change a thing.

You'd be surprised at how many people will turn the tool on at speed 5 though - but you'd get a kick out of the look on their face as that foam frizbee goes flying across the room. We see it from time to time at a Thursday Night Open Garage. The nice thing is that this is probably the worst thing they'll do with a D/A polisher, so no harm, no foul. It is a bit entertaining though. :chuckle1

speed3blackmica
Jan 13th, 2010, 02:31 PM
Hang on there bud!! You're doing it correctly at speed 3 when cleaning the pad. Don't change a thing.

You'd be surprised at how many people will turn the tool on at speed 5 though - but you'd get a kick out of the look on their face as that foam frizbee goes flying across the room. We see it from time to time at a Thursday Night Open Garage. The nice thing is that this is probably the worst thing they'll do with a D/A polisher, so no harm, no foul. It is a bit entertaining though. :chuckle1



lol alright alright. i get it now :D

by the way, i noticed that on my g110, if i hold it in the air and give the backing plate a quick turn, i know the plate should spin freely but it comes to a stop rather quickly, almost as if it feels like it is too tight on the spindal...is this an issue ?

Clutch34
Jan 13th, 2010, 02:42 PM
Hang on there bud!! You're doing it correctly at speed 3 when cleaning the pad. Don't change a thing.

You'd be surprised at how many people will turn the tool on at speed 5 though - but you'd get a kick out of the look on their face as that foam frizbee goes flying across the room. We see it from time to time at a Thursday Night Open Garage. The nice thing is that this is probably the worst thing they'll do with a D/A polisher, so no harm, no foul. It is a bit entertaining though. :chuckle1

What if the pad flew off and hit the person in the face/chest? I'm sure that would be entertaining! Not for them, of course, just everyone else..! :rofl:

ClearlyCoated
Jan 13th, 2010, 02:43 PM
It may have already been addressed in this thread, but for those of us who prime our pads with M135, is it necessary to reapply M135 after cleaning the pad on the fly?

Honda Fit
Feb 14th, 2010, 03:27 PM
I'll be getting my G110V2 in the mail soon, so after reading a lot about this I still have a lot of questions.

1. After cleaning your pad on the fly and considering it really is clean, would it be safe to switch products on the same pad? Or will there still be some previous product left in there that will cause cross-contamination?

2. Kind of goes back to my first question: Before storage, should I keep track of what product I use with each pad and use that combo everytime? This can get expensive, considering all the products Meguiar's makes!

3. Will cleaning the pad on the fly be enough cleaning for storage, or do I need to use water and detergent to effectively clean it?

4. When using a terry cloth on the fly, won't the fibers get stuck in the pad?

kimchiyuk
Feb 14th, 2010, 03:43 PM
I'll be getting my G110V2 in the mail soon, so after reading a lot about this I still have a lot of questions.

1. After cleaning your pad on the fly and considering it really is clean, would it be safe to switch products on the same pad? Or will there still be some previous product left in there that will cause cross-contamination?

2. Kind of goes back to my first question: Before storage, should I keep track of what product I use with each pad and use that combo everytime? This can get expensive, considering all the products Meguiar's makes!

3. Will cleaning the pad on the fly be enough cleaning for storage, or do I need to use water and detergent to effectively clean it?

4. When using a terry cloth on the fly, won't the fibers get stuck in the pad?
1) No you can't switch products when cleaning on the fly.

2)If you use the newer soft buff 2.0 pads, you just machine wash and dry...no need to worry about cross contamination.
Using a QUALITY terry cloth will not introduce fibers to your pad.

AquaBlue
Feb 19th, 2010, 12:06 AM
can you also do this to wool pad? or does wool pad need to be cleaned on the fly?

Michael Stoops
Feb 23rd, 2010, 09:51 AM
A wool pad should be cleaned on the fly regularly, using a pad spur like this:

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/500/pad_spur.jpg

If you have access to compressed air, it does a fantastic job of cleaning a wool pad on the fly.

When finished with the project, a wool pad can simply be placed on a shelf where it will be free from dust and allowed to just dry out. Before next use, simply clean it with the spur or compressed air while spinning it on the rotary buffer and you're good to go.

Alexandre
Apr 17th, 2010, 04:11 PM
Ok, now you finished working but you do not want to toss the pad on the wash machine, since uh, you can' t right now or you are not home, how do you clean your pad?

Michael Stoops
Apr 19th, 2010, 09:05 AM
Ok, now you finished working but you do not want to toss the pad on the wash machine, since uh, you can' t right now or you are not home, how do you clean your pad?

Place it on a reasonably dust free shelf in a cabinet, or in a plastic storage box or large plastic bag (but don't seal the box or bag) so the pad can dry out. When you next use it start by knocking off any loose, dried product and then spin it on the D/A at a slow speed and use a nylon brush to remove more dried product. You should be ready to go after that.

Bill Davidson
Apr 19th, 2010, 09:31 AM
It was asked earlier but I never noticed an answer.

Can you use microfiber towels instead of terry cloth towels to clean the pad on the fly?

xantonin
Apr 19th, 2010, 09:46 AM
It was asked earlier but I never noticed an answer.

Can you use microfiber towels instead of terry cloth towels to clean the pad on the fly?

No, a microfiber will stick to the pad and it is less absorbent than a terry towel.

l SIC l
Nov 18th, 2010, 12:59 AM
Thread revival!

Say I were to completely detail a rather large vehicle like an H2 Hummer (including the use of a paint cleaner, final polish and wax - using the red, black and yellow 6.5"-7" 2.0 Meguiar's foam pads), how many of each pad should I be using for the entire process?

Also, would it be a better idea to buy say, 4 x yellow, 4 x red and 4 x black buffing pads and label them in separate plastic containers as to which product goes with each pad - as I am still not 100% sure to completely clean these pads (is the only real way, seeming as these can't be washed in a machine, to just 'pump/soak' the pad into terry cloth towels until they have been dried out and follow it with a soft bristle brush whilst the D/A is on to remove any remaining product?)

Thanks!!

l SIC l
Nov 18th, 2010, 06:39 AM
Don't worry, I found all the information I needed in this thread ;) : http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=3598&page=2

KiwiKev
Dec 4th, 2011, 11:11 PM
Hi Michael, you are dead right, i couldn't believe how far my g220v2 threw a foam pad.

FRS
Jan 1st, 2012, 03:28 PM
Is cleaning a pad on the fly applicable with Flex 3401?!?!?!?
:cool:
:laughing2


:o

Michael Stoops
Jan 3rd, 2012, 03:14 PM
Absolutely. Cleaning the pad on the fly should be done regardless of the tool used, or the type of pad used. You want your pads as clean as possible all the time. On the Flex 3401, due to the forced rotation action, you may find that a pad brush is more effective and safer than compressing the pad against a towel.

FRS
Jan 3rd, 2012, 08:53 PM
I remember reading here as to how to clean a pad with a brush, but looks lie the I can't find it anymore.


:bash

FRS
Jan 6th, 2012, 03:08 AM
Anyone to help with the link?!

Ta

FRS
Feb 8th, 2012, 01:57 PM
Anyone to help with the link?!

Ta



Bump.. :overhere

Michael Stoops
Feb 9th, 2012, 08:50 AM
Not sure about a full write up on using a brush to clean a pad, FRS, but this picture is from one of our Advanced Classes:

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1642/2010_08_07_advanced_class_0046.JPG

Now, this is on a rotary and not a DA, but the Flex forced rotation tool is probably closer to rotary use than DA use anyway so this will still work for you. Similar to the action used when moving a spur over a wool pad, you want to run the tool at a low to medium speed and apply light to moderate pressure on the face of the pad to brush off excess product. The brush is then moved slowly back and forth from pad edge to pad center, always staying on the same side of the pad. As viewed from this angle the pad is rotating counter clockwise so the brush is, if anything, being pulled toward the floor and away from the operator. We actually had someone using a spur on a wool pad, but working on the "3 o'clock" position from this perspective - the spur got away from him and was thrown into the air by the spinning pad, narrowly missing his face. Cleaning a pad in the orientation shown in this image, in the event the brush or spur gets away from you, it will be thrown to the ground and away from you rather than back up at you. But keeping the tool speed reasonable and a good hold on the brush or spur should make that very easy to prevent!!

AndrewBigA
Feb 12th, 2012, 02:02 PM
that orange brush is great. i use the air blower for a light cleaning. for a heavy cleaning of a pad ill rinse it under the sink under warm water & scrub it with a toothbrush. the annoying part is spinning the wheeel to dry the pad & then re-priming it with liquid. sometimes ill spin the machine & use a few qtips, hold them together to clean the pad. the brush is great but you should use it with a little caution. once the pad dries out if you keep using the brush & spinning the wheel you will start to dig out a lil bit of the foam. you can also spin the machine & hold a damp mf towel to the pad to clean it but that doesnt work as well as the other methods mentioned.

...just hit my 69th post, COOL! lol

Nuscence813
May 10th, 2012, 08:34 PM
Can you machine wash foam 2.0 pads???

Marc08EX
May 10th, 2012, 10:34 PM
Can you machine wash foam 2.0 pads???

Yes. They are machine washable. This is one of the reasons why I like Meguiar's softbuff 2.0 pads.