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View Full Version : 19' boat detail price.?



Joe's detailing
Jan 27th, 2008, 01:50 PM
I recieved a call yesterday on what to charge for detailing the exterior /interior/engine compartment...

The boat has been sitting outside for 3 years, I told the guy I would need to crunch some numbers...

It's going to be a huge job, if I decide to take it on is $25 to $35 a foot to much to ask? I think not...

better to refuse the job, then take it and regret....:idea:

Executive Detailing
Jan 27th, 2008, 02:00 PM
I would request to see the boat before you give him a set price.
Are you just washing/waxing, or are you including the interior, also?
And if you are including the interior, is there leather/vinyl seats, carpeting, wood, etc. which need to be scrubbed and treated (protected)?
Taking all this into account $30-$35/foot seems fair to start.

Did you think about charging by the hour?

I too will be wrangling with this "problem" soon. One of my clients wants me to do his 9, yes NINE boats come spring. (luckily they are at his summer home in the Thousand Island region-can we say working vacation?)

pcmark
Jan 27th, 2008, 02:33 PM
The biggest question is, in what shape is the gel coat? Boats can get very involved very fast. For reasons that I've never understood, many boat owners pay no attention to their boat finishes, allowing them to simply degrade in the weather year after year. You could spend 40 hours on a degraded 19-footer in some cases!

AeroCleanse
Jan 27th, 2008, 03:10 PM
Depends on what kind of boat as well. A 19' sailboat might cost a lot more. (yes sailboats can have engines in them)

Go look at it (as mentioned)

Joe's detailing
Jan 27th, 2008, 03:51 PM
I would request to see the boat before you give him a set price.

Most definitely :coolgleam
Tim (aka) 2hotford told me boats are a PAIN.!!!:wall:
As for what type seats, etc... I haven't a clue at all, I was told the boat is (very)..dirty that's all I know..

Executive Detailing
Jan 27th, 2008, 06:36 PM
For an initial clean, i would agree on a set hourly price until you know what is involved for a perfect job.

I have a client who has 3 custom chooppers which he wanted detailed, and I had no idea what to charge him. We agreed upon a set hourly rate, which worked for me, because I spent 2 hours alone on the front wheel and suspension. (damn chrome and spoke wheels!)

Kriez
Jan 27th, 2008, 07:41 PM
I agree with having to see the boat first. My dad has a 23' boat that is stored inside all the time. He is very meticulous with keeping it clean. However a full detail on the boat can take the two of us between 12 to 16 hours to do. Your arms will fatigue a lot faster under the boat too than doing a car as you are on your back pressing up the whole time.

97t-bird
Jan 28th, 2008, 11:12 AM
I am insured to detail and in the warmer months run a marine detailing business. For the 19 I would charge 400 for the entire boat not inside cabin if it has one and only do it for that price if u have a rotary and appropriate pads. Wool saves a ton of time but can get tricky with swirls. I have used a yellow wool finishing pad from 3m and machine glaze as a light polish on boats with excellent results not for a colored hull may leave marks so you would use a foam pad. As far as the seats most likely every case I have dealt with they are vinyl and #40 works great, if they are real dirty apc before. Wash it with apc or any wash to great down any kind of crud and use a still brush on the deck soft scrub or comet with bleach is great on very nasty decks. I have used 83 with a wool pad with great results on moderate oxidation on white light colored hulls followed by machine glaze or #66 with a yellow finishing pad then topped with 21 for great long lasting results good luck have fun and if you have a helper wiping after you buff should only take 4 hours. Any questions feel free to ask....Greg

Mike Phillips
Jan 29th, 2008, 11:00 AM
Joe,

Here's a couple other guys you might check with...

VanityYachtDetailing (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/member.php?u=3686)

And also Frank Canna (http://mysite.verizon.net/canna/id69.html)

mirrorfinishman
Jan 29th, 2008, 11:31 AM
Joe,

The key to taking on this kind of work is to first understand the need the customer wants you to fill. For example;

1- Is the boat simply being cleaned up so that it can be sold? In that case the owner may just want to pay a minimum fee and have you do a minimum service. Of course, you would only be required to get minimum results. Just so it looks good enough to sell.

2- Is the boat more than five years old and never been polished and waxed? In that case, what would be the point in taking on a new customer who really doesn't want to maintain the boat. Probably would not see someone like that again for another five years.

As you can see, it really all comes down to how this customer fits into the boat detailing market you are aiming at. Like has already been mentioned, boats are a lot of work to begin with without dealing with the ones that have been completely neglected.

Mike Phillips
Jan 29th, 2008, 11:42 AM
Thanks Frank, great insights as usual.

:xyxthumbs

Joe's detailing
Jan 29th, 2008, 11:44 AM
Joe,


2- Is the boat more than five years old and never been polished and waxed? In that case, what would be the point in taking on a new customer who really doesn't want to maintain the boat. Probably would not see someone like that again for another five years.


Well he just bought the boat from someone in OHIO.
He plans to use it for his family to enjoy on the lake, but he wants it so clean you could eat of engine...and willing to pay $300 he's the type of person, I'd never see again .

VanityDetailing
Jan 29th, 2008, 01:19 PM
I was in this position a couple years ago, when a client brought me a 2003 19' Donzi, that sat out in somebody's yard for 3 years, uncovered, unprotected. He bought it at the wholesale auction for $25,000.


It took THREE coats of MV80 and a wool pad to get it on the way to shining again. 2 coats of MV81, 4 coats of MV82, 3 coats of M66, and 6 coats of Flagship Marine wax. A LOT of time was spent in the cabin of it. Mold, leaves, and general disarray made the interior destroyed. I saved it the best I could, but it was far from what I would consider a project I was completely proud of. The engine bay was trashed, and I used a lot of cleaners and degreasers, and got it looking new again.


All in all, the gelcoat buffed out and looked really good. The chrome polished up easily, as did the windows.


I charged him $35/foot for it, and he gave me a $500 tip, when he turned around and sold it for $40,000.


It took a week to do.

mirrorfinishman
Feb 15th, 2008, 02:49 PM
HI Evan, (Vanity Yacht Detailing)

I stopped by your MySpace site and sent you a friends request. Just wondering, given the chance would you take on another detailing job like the one you described?

Your friend,

Frank Canna

VanityDetailing
Feb 23rd, 2008, 02:28 AM
HI Evan, (Vanity Yacht Detailing)

I stopped by your MySpace site and sent you a friends request. Just wondering, given the chance would you take on another detailing job like the one you described?

Your friend,

Frank Canna

If the money was REALLY good, UPFRONT, I'd consider it.


If that exact same boat was in front of me now, I wouldn't touch it for less than $1500-2000. All of the mold inside of it, and all of the destroyed interior, made me sick for 3 weeks, with borderline pneumonia-like symptoms. I was a mess, on 3 different antibiotics.


Now that I think about it, I'd probably decline it, and tell the owner to burn it, and collect the insurance money.


--Evan

ngawaa
Apr 1st, 2009, 02:07 PM
Hey Guys, my nane is Mike From St. Thomas Ont. CAN. I used to work in the Auto Parts Manufacturing sector and after 26 years,my job is belly up. I am starting a boat/RV detailing business and have done a great deal of homework on the business. I have been detailing my own boats as well as friends units for the past 40 years. I elected to go with the per/ft fee in place of the hr. rate as the costomer will know the up front fee with no hidden surprises. I have also gone mobile. A definate plus for the business. I don't mind revieling this info as there is more then enough room out there for more detailers. My detailing includes, compounding, waxing, polishing, bright-work, interior.tops and engine room if so equipted. All included in one price. The people I cater to are " the little guys " All are welcome though. Here in southern Ont. people took a massive hit with the recession and my prices reflect this. Im not in it to get rich over night but more so a labour of love, and make an honest living. I have one question for you professional detailers out there, and I ask this in an inquisitive mannor,and with all due respect, not sarcastic .At $30-$35p/ft, Do people have any issues paying these fees? Im sure you guys do a great jod though customers i've delt with can't afford those fees, again due to economic issues.Please be advised, I am NOT disrespecting your fees, just curious. My philosophy is " you get what you pay for" but in these difficult times, I personally would like to cut some slack. Keep that Meguiars flowing and shine on guys !! Mike