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DonC
Feb 23rd, 2008, 05:45 AM
I have a question in regards to waxing the running surface on the hull of a saltwater boat below the waterline. I would think that the saltwater combined with the speed at which the water travels along the hull at speed would wash away any wax applied? I have always waxed my boats above the waterline but never below. Am I wrong?

Executive Detailing
Feb 23rd, 2008, 08:37 AM
I have never personally tried it, but Meguiar's does have a Marine line, which I would think would answer this situation.

If anyone has any input, please let us know.

pcmark
Feb 23rd, 2008, 09:46 AM
It depends on how the boat is stored. If the boat is birthed, then you want bottom paint to protect the hull's finish. If it's trailered, some wax the hull periodically to remove any contaminants and slick the surface. I always waxed the hulls of my boats.

DonC
Feb 23rd, 2008, 12:37 PM
I understand that you can do it and some choose to do it. My question is how will the wax stand up in the elements. The speed of the water, friction, salt, pollutants found in most marinas and back bays. My guess is the wax below the waterline would not survive more than one or two trips at most. Remember most boats today cruise in the mid 30-mph range and run near 50-mph at w.o.t. It would almost be like powerwashing your hull with saltwater.

mirrorfinishman
Mar 14th, 2008, 09:50 AM
HI Don,

According to an owner/driver I recently met at a hydroplane boat race, you should never wax the bottom of a boat. The reason is the wax does not allow the water to stick to the bottom surface and therefore only creates more friction during forward motion.

Here is how it works. When the bottom of a boat is either painted or left unwaxed the water is allowed to stick to the surface. Since water is now attached to the bottom surface, the water actually acts as slippery medium between the moving boat and the water that is basically standing still. According to what I was told, water against water creates a lot less friction, compared to water against wax.

I am not making this up. This information is coming directly from someone who understands the dynamics involved. Definitely something to consider before waxing below the waterline.

yalerd
Mar 14th, 2008, 09:54 AM
Very nice information Frank.

Seems logical but I would never get to that conclusion but now that you mention it, seems a little logical

Ticman
Mar 14th, 2008, 03:29 PM
HI Don,

According to an owner/driver I recently met at a hydroplane boat race, you should never wax the bottom of a boat. The reason is the wax does not allow the water to stick to the bottom surface and therefore only creates more friction during forward motion.

Here is how it works. When the bottom of a boat is either painted or left unwaxed the water is allowed to stick to the surface. Since water is now attached to the bottom surface, the water actually acts as slippery medium between the moving boat and the water that is basically standing still. According to what I was told, water against water creates a lot less friction, compared to water against wax.

I am not making this up. This information is coming directly from someone who understands the dynamics involved. Definitely something to consider before waxing below the waterline.

:iagree: 100% That's exactly what happens.

Tic

Mike Phillips
Mar 14th, 2008, 03:42 PM
Read an article once a about racing boats where the bottom of the hull was actually coated with some type of paint that have the surface a texture of some type which reduced drag at high speeds, don't remember the details.

Used to machine clean and wax the orange gel-coat of my Sanger not so much for protection but instead just to keep it looking clear and orange like the top surfaces.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/270SangerDragBoat.jpg

Mike Phillips
Mar 14th, 2008, 03:43 PM
I have a question in regards to waxing the running surface on the hull of a saltwater boat below the waterline. I would think that the saltwater combined with the speed at which the water travels along the hull at speed would wash away any wax applied? I have always waxed my boats above the waterline but never below. Am I wrong?

Don't know what the official word on this would be from our Marine department but we can check.

J. A. Michaels
Mar 14th, 2008, 04:12 PM
Frank;

That is some information that I never would have thought of. The more one thinks about it, It does seem very logical. Thanks for the information.

monteith
Mar 14th, 2008, 04:18 PM
Would agree to the race aspect of bottom of the boat, But if you are just out on the water for fun and want to keep the boat looking great, use a cleaner wax on it when it comes out of the water(if it is a trailer boat). Clients of mine have been doing that for years. Whats 15 to 20 minutes of time at the top of the ramp to clean the boat.

Mike Pennington
Mar 31st, 2008, 09:09 AM
I have a question in regards to waxing the running surface on the hull of a saltwater boat below the waterline. I would think that the saltwater combined with the speed at which the water travels along the hull at speed would wash away any wax applied? I have always waxed my boats above the waterline but never below. Am I wrong?

Is the bottom surface (below water line) different than the rest of the boat ? Many times in salt water boats, there is bottom paint / anti fouling paint that you do not want to wax.

If it is normal gel coat, then by all means you do want to clean and wax on a regular basis to keep it looking its best.

Mike

RamAirV1
Mar 31st, 2008, 04:19 PM
Is the bottom surface (below water line) different than the rest of the boat ? Many times in salt water boats, there is bottom paint / anti fouling paint that you do not want to wax.

If it is normal gel coat, then by all means you do want to clean and wax on a regular basis to keep it looking its best.

Mike

Very true! My boat spends the summer at a dock in fresh water and I also have to use an anti-fouling paint. In my case, it must be reapplied every other year. When I had algae, etc on the bottom of the hull, it cost me about 10 MPH in top speed. Needless to say it had a significant effect on fuel mileage too!

If you are having issues with marine growth, you will have to resort to a bottom paint. The effect of a wax is only temporary and will probably not last the season.

I use #50 for above the waterline and it works great!

RamAirV1