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View Full Version : Swirl Removers? And Fords too soft clearcoat.



oldmodman
Mar 8th, 2004, 11:49 PM
What is the difference between;
#9 Swirl Remover
#82 Swirl Free Polish Meg#M8201
#83 Dual Action Cleaner Polish Meg#8301
& Scratch-X
What I am looking for is the best product to use with my Porter Cable random orbital polisher. I will be using 8006 pad.
I am trying to remove the faint (dealer installed) swirl marks on the hood of a 2003 Yellow Mustang Cobra

By the way I just finished using Scratch-X on a neighbors 1998 VW Jetta, dark blue, finished with NXT, two coats and it looks great.
But I am somewhat afraid to use the Scratch X on the Mustang.
It seem that the clearcoat on Fords is very prone to scratching.
But if anyone knows which product to use it's probably someone on this forum. Thanks!

sonicblue02
Mar 9th, 2004, 07:05 AM
I have a 2002 GT and used #9 followed by NXT just the other day and it looks great. I definitely know what you mean about dealer instilled scratches! When it gets warmer i think that i will clay bar it to get any contaminents off, then use #9 again, and then some polish, and finish it up with NXT. Just make sure that you follow the directions.

Mike Phillips
Mar 9th, 2004, 07:08 AM
Originally posted by oldmodman
What is the difference between;

#9 Swirl Remover
#82 Swirl Free Polish
#83 Dual Action Cleaner Polish
& Scratch-X

#9, #82, and #83 are all cleaner polishes. This means they are part cleaner and part polish. The cleaning action comes from diminishing abrasives. The polishing part comes from Meguiar’s trade secret oils.

See this article for more information: Why Meguiar’s recommends polishing paint (http://www.meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=205)

Of the three you listed, here is the order of the aggressiveness starting with the least aggressive,

#9 Swirl Remover 2.0
#82 Swirl Free Polish
#83 Dual Action Cleaner Polish


What I am looking for is the best product to use with my Porter Cable random orbital polisher. I will be using 8006 pad. I am trying to remove the faint (dealer installed) swirl marks on the hood of a 2003 Yellow Mustang Cobra.

Meguiar’s always promotes the philosophy of,

Use the least aggressive product to get the job done

Two reasons for the above philosophy,

1) By using the least aggressive product to get the job done, you leave the most paint on the car
2) If your first choice doesn’t get the job done, you can always substitute a more aggressive product

Following the above sage advise, I would try either the #9 or the #82 first, if this product did not get the job done, then try the #83

If you don’t already have these products in your tool chest, then the #9 might be the way to go since it will cost you less upfront because it’s available in a 16 ounce bottle while the other two can only be purchased in 32 ounce bottles. Just a consideration. It’s hard to be more specific than that without being there to see the swirls. If these swirls are light like you say, then perhaps they were instilled through washing? If they are deeper, like the swirls inflicted by a rotary buffer, then it will probably take something at least as aggressive as the #83 to remove them depending on how hard the paint is and how deep the swirls are.[/B][/QUOTE]


By the way I just finished using Scratch-X on a neighbors 1998 VW Jetta, dark blue, finished with NXT, two coats and it looks great. But I am somewhat afraid to use the Scratch X on the Mustang.
It seem that the clearcoat on Fords is very prone to scratching. But if anyone knows which product to use it's probably someone on this forum. Thanks!

All clear coats are prone to scratching, thus the term scratch-sensitive. Modern clear coats are wonderful in that they are very durable. By durable, I mean they will last a long time. Don’t confuse that to mean they will look good for a long time because this isn’t true. Just go look at the cars in any large parking lot and inspect their finishes.

Modern clear coats, while much harder than traditional lacquers and enamels, still scratch easily, and unlike a single-stage finish, clear coats tends to amplify scratches, (or any defects).

For these reasons it is very important to always do your best to reduce the potential for instilling scratches into your finish by always using products and application materials that are of the highest quality. This includes your wash mitts. If you use a tatty or worn mitt, you can easily instill thousands of scratches into your finish. Same goes for removal materials like microfibers and terry cloth towels. Make sure they are soft, clean and high quality. Then, use good technique when washing, cleaning, polishing and applying waxes. Your results will reflect your attention to detail. (no pun intended :D)

Hope this helps…

Mike

oldmodman
Mar 9th, 2004, 11:28 AM
Thanks guys, this is just the kind of information that you can't get anywhere else. I am going to order some more pads so I don't have to worry about mixing them. I already have the #9 and Scratch-X so I am set on those products. I'll borrow a camera and post pics of the results.

gb387
Mar 9th, 2004, 02:45 PM
I have a 03 Ford Lightning (black) and I just used #9 on it last weekend and it worked quite well. No problems I am very happy with the results.

I did #9/Deep Crystal Polish/NXT

Good luck!

Bri9801
Mar 9th, 2004, 03:15 PM
Originally posted by 2hotford
I have not had any problems with Ford paint. I actually find it to be one of the better OEM paints.

I haven't had any problems with my Ford paint either ....My Expedition is a '98 and the paint still looks pretty good.

Marc Hufnagel
Mar 9th, 2004, 03:18 PM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Mike Phillips
[B]#9, #82, and #83 are all cleaner polishes. This means they are part cleaner and part polish. The cleaning action comes from diminishing abrasives. The polishing part comes from Meguiar’s trade secret oils.

Can you please clarify "diminshing abrasives?"

Mike Phillips
Mar 9th, 2004, 05:12 PM
Just to add onto what Tim wrote,

Some of the diminishing abrasives in some of Meguiar’s products are large enough you can feel them with your fingers, products like,

M-04 Heavy Cut Cleaner in the Professional Line (http://www.meguiars.com/store_meguiars/product_detail.cfm?sku=M-04)

or

M-49 Heavy Duty Oxidation Remover (http://www.meguiars.com/store_meguiars/product_detail.cfm?sku=M-49)


Other products use microscopic diminishing abrasives, that while yes, the do start out large and break down, the word large is relative. These abrasive also break down, but if your were to pour some out and try to feel them with your fingers, it would be difficult to feel them. In fact products with these types of diminishing abrasives feel more like a hand lotion than a compound.

Here are three examples of products that use microscopic diminishing abrasives that work really great, but you will be hard pressed to feel any abrasive particles in them.


ScratchX (http://www.meguiars.com/store_meguiars/product_detail.cfm?sku=G-103)

PlastX (http://www.meguiars.com/store_meguiars/product_detail.cfm?sku=G-123)

#84 Compound Power Cleaner (http://www.meguiars.com/store_meguiars/product_detail.cfm?sku=M-84)

M-85 Diamond Cut Compound (http://www.meguiars.com/store_meguiars/product_detail.cfm?sku=M-85)


But the point is, instead of working like old-fashioned rubbing and polishing compounds that start out aggressive and scratch scour the finish both at the beginning of the process and at the end of the process, leaving your finish look swirled, hazy and scoured, Meguiar’s Compounds, Paint cleaners, and Cleaner/Polishes are cushioned, in a rich, lubricating oil film, which buffers the cutting action of the diminishing abrasives. As they breakdown, they leave your finish looking polished instead of scoured.

Meguiar’s pioneered the use of diminishing abrasives, first in the furniture polish business starting in 1901, and then in the automotive coatings industries as a supplier to OEM’s and the refinishing industry, (collision repair and custom paint shops).

Mike

rjstaaf
Mar 9th, 2004, 05:18 PM
Originally posted by oldmodman

It seem that the clearcoat on Fords is very prone to scratching.

I agree that Mustang paint is rather soft. It can be a blessing though. First it does not tend to chip as easily as harder paints and it is easier to work when you get swirls or scratches.

With softer paint you really have to practice safe washing/drying and QD techniques. Get lots of microfiber :)

Don't know what else I can add to what has already been said about #9,#82 and #83 other than "ditto" :D

RamAirV1
Apr 4th, 2004, 02:47 AM
Some other cleaners can be added to the list of the cleaner polishes to try when removing swirls.

In order from least to most aggressive:

#9 v.2.0 *
#82 Swirl Free Polish *
#A30 Deep Crystal Paint Cleaner
#80 Speed Glaze (?) *
#A10 Body Scrub
#108 Scratch X *
#97 MPPC
#2 Fine Cut Cleaner
#83 Dual Action Cleaner Polish *

I'm not sure where #80 Speeed Glaze fits on the list, that's why I have the question mark there. The * shows products that have polish in them and may have swirl filling ability. My epxerience with #9 makes me conclude that it has more swiril filling ability rather than it does swirl removal.

If #82 doesn't remove the swirls I would try Scratch X and then maybe MPPP. #2 needs to be used with a rotary and #83 is best used with a rotary.

Maybe Ford uses different paint on its trucks than its cars. My WS6 TA had VERY soft clearcoat on the hood but the rest of the car had a harder clearcoat. The hood (with those famous notstrils) was painted by ASC then sent back to the assembly plant to finish the car.

RamAirV1