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Clicker
Mar 10th, 2004, 12:58 AM
Hi Guys:

Just wondering what the main differences are between Gold Class Clear Coat Wax and #26 Wax.

Gold Class instructions advise applying to entire vehicle, let dry, then wipe/buff off.

#26 Wax advises applying to one section of the car then wiping off.

Why do they recommend different application techniques.

Which product leaves a longer lasting coat?? (I'm using it over a Deep Crystal Polish Prep for a new F 150)

Thanks!

Joe

Clicker
Mar 10th, 2004, 10:13 AM
Thanks Tim:

But how does that translate....

Does that mean that #26 Wax dries harder (advised to do a section at a time vs whole vehicle).

And if it dries harder, does it leave a stronger finish, or protection?

Which wax leaves the hardest finish.... I'm interested in traditional Carnuba types.

Thanks in advance ...

Joe

Mike Phillips
Mar 12th, 2004, 08:59 AM
Originally posted by Clicker
Hi Guys:

Just wondering what the main differences are between Gold Class Clear Coat Wax and #26 Wax.

Gold Class instructions advise applying to entire vehicle, let dry, then wipe/buff off.

#26 Wax advises applying to one section of the car then wiping off.

Why do they recommend different application techniques.

Which product leaves a longer lasting coat?? (I'm using it over a Deep Crystal Polish Prep for a new F 150)

Thanks!

Joe
Hi Joe,

Gold Class Clear Coat Wax is a Polish/Wax, that is, it contains special polishing oils that create deep dark reflections. It is a wax that really darkens medium to dark colored cars. Gold Class is also a blended wax. That means its protection properties come from a blend of different ingredients, not just a single ingredient (for example Carnauba).

M-26 Hi Tech Yellow Wax is a Pure Wax. Generally speaking, when we talk about a wax being a pure wax, we mean it has no cleaning ability, therefore it should only be used on new, like new or pre-cleaned and pre-polished surfaces. The primary purpose of a pure wax is to provide protection, it does this by leaving behind a sacrifical barrier film.

#26 Hi Tech Yellow Wax is sometimes thought of as a Carnauba based wax, probably because it uses the word yellow in the title, and people usually associate carnauba with yellow because one of the commercially available grades of carnauba waxes is called, #1 Yellow Carnauba wax. The back of the label on the bottle also talks about the use of Carnauba wax in the formula. But if you read the back label carefully, it says that #26 Hi Tech Wax is a blend of Carnauba, Silicones, Polymers, Resins and other waxes. Besides protecting your finish, #26 Hi Tech Yellow Wax will also darken medium to dark color paints created deep, dark reflections like the Gold Class. While one wax is a polish/wax and the other is a pure wax, they both provide deep dark reflections, high gloss and protection.

I did not write the directions for applications for these two products, but I’ll take a guess at the reason for different application and removal techniques from my experience writing label copy.

When writing directions for using products like waxes, you have to take into account a very wide variety of people of whom some have very good skills, while others have less. To insure everyone that uses a product experiences good results, it’s usually a good idea to remove any chance of risk.

Gold Class is an incredibly easy wax to both apply and remove. For this reason the average person can apply it to the entire car and then remove it without any difficulty.

#26 Hi-Tech Yellow Wax can be a little more difficult to remove for some people. Remember, #26 Hi Tech Yellow wax is a product in the Professional Line. The Professional Line is a line of products formulated for professional craftsman who tend to have very high skill levels. I don’t think #26 is any more difficult to remove than Gold Class, but the directions were probably written to ensure that even someone with less experience could still get excellent results from both applying and removing this product.

If you feel your skill level is up to par and you’re applying #26 Hi-Tech Yellow wax to the appropriate surface, you could probably apply this wax to the entire car and then remove it, instead of working section by section. The section at a time technique is just an extra level of protection to insure all people experience excellent results.

As far as which product leaves behind a longer lasting coat of wax? I would expect the #26 Hi Tech Yellow Wax to protect longer because it’s a pure wax which by definition would mean it’s primary purpose is to protect and that would lead me to believe that it contains a higher percentage of protection ingredients, whereas the Gold Class is a polish/wax and contains both protection ingredients and rich polishing oil.

That said, both waxes use wax and polymer technology developed by Meguiar’s drawing from our expertise in manufacturing all types of surface care products for over 100 years. Unlike most manufactures of car wax type products, Meguiar’s works closely with both car manufactures and paint manufactures. These unique relationships provide Meguiar’s with an edge over the competition when it comes to creating state of the art formula’s.

Hope this helps…

Mike

Mike Phillips
Mar 12th, 2004, 09:06 AM
Originally posted by Clicker
Does that mean that #26 Wax dries harder (advised to do a section at a time vs whole vehicle).

And if it dries harder, does it leave a stronger finish, or protection?

Which wax leaves the hardest finish.... I'm interested in traditional Carnauba types.

Thanks in advance ...

Joe

Hi Joe,

Neither of these products dries hard. They both are incredibly easy to wipe off as long as you have applied thin coats, and applied them to the appropriate surface. They are very different waxes however.

#26 Hi Tech Yellow Wax dries very clear. If you apply a thin coating to your finish, allow it to dry for 15 minutes and then inspect, you will notice it is clear. Not 100% clear, but it definitely does not turn white. The Gold Class is a little more opaque, but it doesn't turn white on the finish either.

As I mentioned in my first response, neither of these waxes are based solely on carnauba but are blended waxes that include carnauba.

By blending multiple ingredients, you get the benefits from multiple ingredients.

What are you working on?

Mike

Clicker
Mar 12th, 2004, 07:53 PM
Mike:

Thank you so much for your comprehensive, knowledgeable responses. That's exactly what I was looking for to understand the products a little more.

I am working on my 1 month old 2004 Ford F 150 XLT-- Deep Torreador Red (looks kinda like the old "Candy Apple Red" in the sun).

The first day I had it I used the Deep Crystal #2 Polish, and then 2 coats of the #3 Wax..... I week later I put on another coat of step #3 Wax.

It deepened the color and looks great! Folks comment everyday on the shine, and I tell them it's Meguiar's!!!

I'vs since purchased some #26, and also a bottle of Gold Class to try. I think this weekend I will throw some #26 on for additional protection, and then in a couple of months try out the Gold Class (as a stand alone application).

But Mike-- I am open to any suggestions you may have-- I appreciate your expertise!!

I am applying the liquid by hand.... and don't mind a good workout.

Thanks again for your expertise.... I learned a lot from your explanation.

Sincerely,
Joe

denetc
Mar 13th, 2004, 05:13 AM
I've tried 4 kinds on my red Tiburon after deep crystal #1 and #2 in all cases. Crystal #3 really "felt" waxy, looks wet after removal, hard not to keep fingers off, it seemed to cast a faint blue hue looking at it. It also only seems to last with my outside car at most 3 weeks. Gold Class did not seem to change the color, good protection and shiny, not much for "Feel", seemed to last 4+ weeks, was unforgiving on my trim. #26 makes my red deeper richer and warmer, and lasts 4 + weeks. NXT makes my red brighter- technocolor- and is super shiny and feels slick and lasts 4+weeks. All the products were pretty easy on and off by hand, and looked great, just I was surprised in the small differences I got. I enjoy all them really, my coworkers really raved when I used #26. I raved over NXT results. Will be interesting to hear back from you after you try them.

denetc
Mar 13th, 2004, 05:25 AM
nxt pic. sorry dont have from any other product just got a camera.

Clicker
Mar 15th, 2004, 03:31 PM
Bump for Mike's Reply... to any suggestions.....

Mosca
Mar 15th, 2004, 04:05 PM
1) Both #26 and GC are a son of a gun to remove if you use too much. THIN. If either one "cakes", you can look forward to an hour of elbow grease, white residue, and possible streaking on single stage paints. LESS IS MORE.

2) #26 is my favorite wax for red. EVERY wax looks great on a properly prepared finish, and the secret is in the prep; but I have a special love for that "red glass" look that I get from #26.

Here's a picture, my favorite picture of my car with #26. It looks so hot that it looks like it is going to burst into flames....

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/11DSCF0083-med.JPG

Clicker
Mar 15th, 2004, 06:58 PM
Thanx Mosca:

Wow--- That red looks liquid..... great job!!

What did you do for prep, and how often do you prep?

Also how often do you wax....... do you prep whenever you wax?

Joe

Mosca
Mar 15th, 2004, 07:45 PM
Prep:

I clayed once a couple years ago, but I haven't needed to since. I'm kind of a fanatic about washing and polishing.

I did one HUGE prep a couple years ago, involving a lot of scratch and swirl and oxidation removal. I used the PC, a wool pad, and #83 for the heavy work, then #83 with an orange cutting pad. I then used Menzerna Intensive Polish with a polishing pad, and Menzerna Final Polish with a light polishing pad (sorry, Meguiar's, for posting about a competitor on your board, but it's an answer to a direct question). At each step, if I wasn't satisfied, I repeated the step. I think I #83'd 3 times, IP'd twice, and FP'd once.

That was the prep from which all my detailing started.

For that picture, I used #7, then #20, then #26. #7 is one of my all time favorite products. Actually, EVERY product in that regimen is one of my all time favorites, from #83 down to the final, #26.

I do one big prep in the spring, but not with the wool pad or cutting pad now; and then if the car's had a rough summer I do another smaller one in the late summer. I don't usually do one in the fall or winter, because northeast winters are so hard on the car. I almost always use a glaze, #7 for that car. Sometimes I use a cleaner wax, like A1216, or #6, or Medallion; with regular use, a cleaner wax helps keep swirls under control without having to do the big prep. I put the cleaner wax over the glaze. If it removes some of it, so what? Miatas are small, It's easy to do it again. And, "the act of pushing a creamy substance across paint with a foam applicator adds gloss," sez Mike.

The last couple years, I was using #83 with a polishing pad (not a cutting pad), then IP and FP. This year I might skip the #83, though, the car's pretty good right now. So it would be IP/FP. I'd guess that the comparable Meguiar's product would be #82, or #9? I'm willing to learn, whatever they are.

As for how often I wax, well, I waxed 9 times in January, and 7 in February, but only once so far in March. I'd estimate that I wax 30 or 40 times a year, but that's sometimes 3 times a week, and other times once every 3 weeks.


Tom

Clicker
Mar 15th, 2004, 08:44 PM
Mosca--- Thanks for that information-- I think I will like the #26 on my New Torreador Red F 150.... The Crystal System steps 2, and 3 have it looking great right now..... have 3 coats of #3 now...

Mike, Mosca or anyone:

Do you think frequent hand-waxing with #26 or Polish Wax like Gold Coat (say 2 month or so) can take off or damage gel-coat??

Joe

Mosca
Mar 16th, 2004, 06:43 AM
You mean gel-coat, like on a cap or a hard tonneau? That stuff's pretty tough, I think.

#26, nope, never. My car is single stage paint, and #26 paste has NEVER removed any pigment. The #26 liquid might remove a little bit, but what looks like a lot on an applicator or PC pad is actually an infinitesmally small amount, compared to how much paint is actually on your car/truck.

Gold Class will remove some coloration, but the amount that it removes is still negligible. I would suppose that you could wax once a week for 5 years with Gold Class, or any cleaner wax, and not cut through to the base coat.

Mike Phillips
Mar 16th, 2004, 06:58 AM
Originally posted by Clicker
Mosca--- Thanks for that information-- I think I will like the #26 on my New Torreador Red F 150.... The Crystal System steps 2, and 3 have it looking great right now..... have 3 coats of #3 now...

Mike, Mosca or anyone:

Do you think frequent hand-waxing with #26 or Polish Wax like Gold Coat (say 2 month or so) can take off or damage gel-coat??

Joe

What Tom said :p

Mike

electricgreen
Mar 23rd, 2004, 02:45 PM
I love the Gold Class. I have used Meguiars products exclusively since buying my 00 Stang used 2 years ago. It's a very metallic, deep color, so I feel like the guy in the commerical "smooth as glass, thank you megiuars!" when it's done. As far as the removal of gold class-I've never had a problem. My husband, mr impatient, did once on his bronco-only because he didn't let it fully dry. It's actually harder to get off when not fully dry then when fully dry-it tends to smear rather than wipe off. Here's a great refelctive pic of my car-this was about a month after the last wax w/GC (I really had to down size it to upload, hope it doesn't lose too much quality!!):