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daniel
Jun 24th, 2008, 12:03 AM
Lifespan of NXT Tech Wax (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=24855)


Hi,
Do waxs last longer on the car in colder climates vs tropical climates?

I've noticed, even with NXT wax, the finish loses the 'waxed' feel just after 2 weeks! Is this normal?

I'm aware that the type of car wash will determine this. Just wondering is 2 weeks is just to premature or not.

michaeld0983
Jun 24th, 2008, 12:28 AM
Hi,
Do waxs last longer on the car in colder climates vs tropical climates?

I've noticed, even with NXT wax, the finish loses the 'waxed' feel just after 2 weeks! Is this normal?

I'm aware that the type of car wash will determine this. Just wondering is 2 weeks is just to premature or not.

NXt 1.0 or NXT 2.0?

VonLego
Jun 24th, 2008, 12:33 AM
To my understanding 1.0 is about a month, 2.0 about two months.

Prep work is a very important part of the sequence though. How did you prep your car?

Specifically....

Did you clay?
Did you polish? How?

EAT HEMI
Jun 24th, 2008, 04:58 AM
I think the lifespan of a wax depends on lots of things. Whether it is a daily driver or a garage queen makes a big difference. Even if the car is garaged each night makes a huge difference as well.

3Fitty
Jun 24th, 2008, 07:33 AM
:iagree: It is totally dependent upon conditions and exposure to elements. I got six weeks out of my wife's daily driver, parked outside 24/7 and exposed to the elements all the time.

I'm going on three months on my garage parked, limited use, recreational vehicle. I also use the NXT spray as a booster and the UQD on my recreational vehicle.

Mike Phillips
Jun 24th, 2008, 08:11 AM
How a car is washed and how often it is washed affects how long a wax will last and how the paint will feel.

Just the act of pushing a wash mitt over the surface of a waxed car will tend to micro-abrade any coating off the paint, even if you're using a quality car wash. Some car washes are more chemically harsh to a coating of wax than others. This would include touchless car washes and household solutions like dish washing soap.

Probably the most important factor as it relates to how long a coating of wax will last is this...

"How well was the surface prepared to accept the wax"

Our chemists formulate our automotive waxes to stick, bond or adhere to automotive paints which broken down are a type of resin. If the paint is dirty with contaminants, then these contaminants block or hinder the protection ingredients from being able to reach the paint where they were designed to bond to.

Here's an example of how claying can affect wax longevity taken from this class here at Meguiar's.


San Diego Shelby Club - Pictures & Comments (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=22888)


One of the members in this club brought their very nicely restored 1969 Cougar with a new paint job that was approximately 6 months old. The car is parked inside most of the time unless it's being driven.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/676/ShelbyClub005.jpg



Most people would expect a new paint job, and in fact a custom paint job to be perfect, or very close to it. You wouldn't expect the paint needs to be clayed and cleaned before applying some wax after the 30 day waiting period for the paint to full cure or outgass.

Yet look at the black gunk being removed off the new paint job with the use of the detailing clay out of Meguiar's Smooth Surface Clay Kit.

Here one of the club members is claying just a small area on the hood.
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/676/ShelbyClub009.jpg


Here's what she and everyone was removing off the brand new paint job.
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/676/ShelbyClub010.jpg



Now let me tie this together... the gunk on this car, which is layered all over the horizontal surfaces will prevent any wax from reaching the actual paint where it can properly bond.

Above Surface Bonded Contaminants, (that's a term coined by Meguiar's), not only block or hinder a wax from properly bonding or adhering to the paint surface, they also reduce gloss because gloss comes from smoothness and Above Surface Bonded Contaminants create texture. Texture reduces smoothness and thus reduces gloss.

So the most important factor to how long a wax will last determined by how well the paint surface is prepared to accept the wax.

After that factor probably the next most important factor is how the coating of wax is treated, (washing primarily), and the kind of environment it is exposed to and how many hours out of each day the coating of wax is exposed to.

A fresh coat of wax will last longer if the car is parked in garage versus if the car is parked outside all the time.

Meguiar's never makes any claims as to how long a wax will last because there are too many variable as to how the car in question is treated and/or exposed to the environment.

Meguiar's does stand behind their 100% Satisfaction Guarantee and we've been doing this for over 100 years, so if you're not happy with the performance of any of our products then simply return the product to the place of purchase with your receipt or call Customer Care at 1-800-347-5700

Alfisti
Jun 25th, 2008, 09:59 AM
Great post, Mike. :xyxthumbs

Markus Kleis
Jun 25th, 2008, 10:32 AM
I would venture to guess that the vast majority of users fail to A.) Properly prep the surface for their LSP, and B.) Use incorrect wash methods or products that quickly strip *any* wax away and ultimately blame the wax for not lasting long enough.

Take the advice Mike just gave, along with making sure to use properly pH balanced soaps (Meg's has several) and see how long the wax lasts then.

Duramax Dreamin
Jun 25th, 2008, 05:31 PM
I just purchased the NXT 2.0 after watching Mike's excellent video on the PC (Just received the G110 :) and seeing the breath taking results on the Vette. I was so impressed I had to give NXT a try. If I understood correctly from the previous comments, it sounds like if a) paint is properly preped, and b) exposure to the elements remain the same, I should anticipate getting similar lifespan with NXT compared to my trusty old #26 (I love the Carnauba smell)? I guess I was thinking that being polymer based it would last considerably longer than the HI-Tech wax. Is it possible that the "wax feel" fades with NXT, but that it is actually protecting longer than #26? When the wax feel fades, is it similar to Carnauba wax in that it is an indicator it is time to re-wax to ensure the paint is protected? I always use the Gold soap on my vehicles (seams to clean much better than less expensive brands), so I guess I just need to try it out on my wife's Tundra and compare it to the #26 on my truck. Thanks for the great info!

mixxmstrmike
Jun 26th, 2008, 03:47 PM
I have had NXT 2.0 paste last me in upwards of three months. The "feel" or slickness is lost about 1.5 to 2 months, but the car still beads well. Does beading equal protection? That's another debate for another post, BUT, beading does tell me there's something on the surface of the vehicle that's causing the surface tension to bead the water. My daily driver is outside 24/7 and is in Northern California with not so severe temperatures, low 40s at nights and 60-80's during the daytime. I have to mention that I got the longevity of NXT washing the car every 3 weeks. I am in agreement that the more frequently you wash a vehicle, the more protection is being slowly abraded away.

Hope this may provide a little insight and answer to your question.

-Mike

asim_296
Nov 2nd, 2008, 06:22 PM
I don't think beading means protection. I notice that once after working with 83 then I ran water on the hood and it beaded up. It might be the smooth slick surface causes the beading. for me, the slickness feel decreases by 60% after the first wash. thats why I have 135 and NXT spray wax in my arsenal. then I'll do the next detail after 3 months (my car 24/7 parked outside and daily drive)

I think It's very important to maintain the wax after every wash and of course you can skip it and wax more often.

Johnson
Nov 2nd, 2008, 07:52 PM
everyone is asking how many days, weeks months the wax will last.. It is known that it all depends on what kinda conditions the car is in all the time and all. I think we can all understand that...

My guestion is.. what are the first signs that it needs to be waxed? If its weeks or months or how ever long it has been since you last wax.. if you have kept it real clean and in the garage or not or what ever the case maybe? You dont just say, its been 2 weeks since I waxed it.. I better do it again.. Is there a wax and protection test we can do to know when it needs to be done again....

Sydster
Nov 3rd, 2008, 03:51 AM
for me, the slickness feel decreases by 60% after the first wash. thats why I have 135 and NXT spray wax in my arsenal.


:xyxthumbs

maarten22
Nov 3rd, 2008, 07:40 AM
I waxed a Z06 a year ago with 2 coats of NXT 1.0, and it seems it is still on there. I clayed a small section and in the rain this part doesn't beat and the rest of the hood does. Can a wax be on a care after a year???

Mike Phillips
Nov 3rd, 2008, 08:36 AM
My question is.. what are the first signs that it needs to be waxed?


When your quick detailer becomes slow to wipe off.

Here's the best practice you can put into play, apply a fresh coat of wax on a regular maintenance plan, just like you practice with oil changes.

If you drive your car as a daily driver then wax it ever 2-3 months. If you want to make sure there's plenty of wax protection AND you want your car to look it's best then wax more often.

If you wax often your paint will always be in great shape and this makes applying and removing the next coat of wax fast and easy. It's only when you let it go long enough that you'll have to clay the paint and then use some kind of swirl mark remover before you wax and this will take more time and effort than simply washing or wiping clean and the applying a fresh coat of wax.

I'm lucky in that my daily driver has ZERO trim to avoid and ail the panels are for the most part flat and rectangular in shape and this makes it very, very easy and fast to run a G100 over it with a polishing pad and some NXT.

The more complicated your car panels, the more rubber and plastic trim you have the more time it will take you because you have slow down and be careful around these area. (Something to consider next time you buy a car, look not only for safety, reliability price etc, but also for a car that's more fun to work on, not a hassle).


There's a number or reasons I have the Sig Line I have, one of them is to bring the proper perspective on wax wars, another is to try to make it simple to understand how to always have a great looking finish.


"Find something you like and use it often"

If you like it, then you obviously like how it applies and removes and it looks good in your eyes, if you use it often your car's paint will always look new because it's only when paint is neglected that it goes down hill.


:)

akimel
Nov 3rd, 2008, 08:47 AM
I'm lucky in that my daily driver has ZERO trim to avoid and ail the panels are for the most part flat and rectangular in shape and this makes it very, very easy and fast to run a G100 over it with a polishing pad and some NXT.

This jumped out at me. Are there times, Mike, when using a polishing pad rather than a finishing pad is preferred when applying the LSP? Does this only apply to NXT? TIA.

Al

Mike Phillips
Nov 3rd, 2008, 09:04 AM
Sure.

If you want more cleaning power then you can alter,

Product
Process - Hand or Machine and type of Machine
Application Material - What the thing that's touching the paint is made out of

The Jimmy isn't a show truck, it's a work truck and my 9-year old boy and all his little buddies play in it all the time and they don't use the door to get into the truck, the climb up the tires and grab the roll bar and swing in like they're playing on a jungle gym. The sides of the truck get a lot of abuse from this kind of playing. Also the truck sits outside 24x7 in desert conditions, so yeah... I use a polishing pad instead of a finishing pad for just a little extra cleaning action. The hood gets clayed about once a month as dust is always settling on it and then mixing with dew overnight to form a dust paste.

It has a $2000.00 paint job with orange peel throughout, but by waxing it often the paint always looks clear and glossy and pretty good from about 15 feet away. Perfectly acceptable for a 33 year old former Orange Orchard Farm Truck.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/648/Old1975Jimmy.jpg

akimel
Nov 3rd, 2008, 09:43 AM
Perfectly acceptable for a 33 year old former Orange Orchard Farm Truck.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/648/Old1975Jimmy.jpg

Egads! This truck is 33 years old?

If 7 dog years equal 1 human year, I wonder how that works out in terms of truck years. :)

EPHIOS
Nov 3rd, 2008, 10:51 AM
I currently have NXT Tech Wax (first version) on my car, and I have a garage. After a month, the wax was still intact (Final Inspection still beads, and easy to wipe). I would except another month of protection from the Tech Wax.

Trigger
Nov 5th, 2008, 04:06 AM
I would like to approach the question of wax longevity from a different angle.
My daily driver just got kicked out of the garage by my wife's new car. Now in a perfect world, I would have plenty of time to wax more often. Wrong!!!
So my question is. All things being equal, is it possible to say which wax/sealant products I can expect to get the most life out of?
I live close to an auto parts store that has a wide selection of Mirror Glaze products. So they can be thrown into the mix also, though I will be hand applying whatever I use.

akimel
Nov 5th, 2008, 04:54 AM
I would like to approach the question of wax longevity from a different angle.
My daily driver just got kicked out of the garage by my wife's new car. Now in a perfect world, I would have plenty of time to wax more often. Wrong!!!
So my question is. All things being equal, is it possible to say which wax/sealant products I can expect to get the most life out of?
I live close to an auto parts store that has a wide selection of Mirror Glaze products. So they can be thrown into the mix also, though I will be hand applying whatever I use.

From all I have read, both here and on other forums, NXT paste and #21 enjoy the reputation of being the most durable of the Meguiar's sealants.

yakky
Nov 5th, 2008, 07:52 AM
From all I have read, both here and on other forums, NXT paste and #21 enjoy the reputation of being the most durable of the Meguiar's sealants.

I think you will get longer water beading with #16, but as has been mentioned, there is no real way to tell when the product is done for. If you want the longest lasting product, IMO, look elsewhere, Meguiars seems to compromise durability for looks and most importantly protection, which I am more than ok with, but if you want ultimate durability there are other choices.

Johnson
Nov 5th, 2008, 01:30 PM
When your quick detailer becomes slow to wipe off.
:)

Can you explain that a little more. I wiped my car off last night and was kinda looking at how I could tell. I tried it on my car that was freshly waxed, then I tried it on a buddies car that never gets waxed.. I couldent tell a difference