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Carfire
Jan 24th, 2009, 12:04 PM
I was wondering how everyone else drys their pads on the various machines.
I have the G110 and I normally clean the pad in the sink (no detergent unless really saturated) with warm water. Then I squezee it out. Then I go outside attach the pad to the G110 and slowly go up to 6. Next I slowly go down to 1. Normally by the it is pretty dry.

Andy M.
Jan 24th, 2009, 12:45 PM
I kinda think my answer would be all of the above. After cleaning them I squeeze them out getting as much water as I can out of them. The I will attach them to the machine and spin them pressing a towel into the face of the pad, and then I wrap them with a towel and lay them perfectly flat to dry the rest of the way.

Andy M.

AeroCleanse
Jan 24th, 2009, 12:45 PM
I use all of the above

eyezack87
Jan 24th, 2009, 02:07 PM
Another for all the above :)

imacarnut
Jan 24th, 2009, 03:48 PM
after i'm done using and wash the pads, i squeeze as much water out as possible, then hold the pad by the edge and swing out (hold it tight so it doesn't fly out of your hands LOL) as much water as possible and then lay it on the grit guard to dry...

J. A. Michaels
Jan 24th, 2009, 04:10 PM
I know this way is not recommended, But with the 8006, or the 9006 pads. After washing them, I would put them in the dryer on medium heat. After about 20 minutes take them out and let them air dry the rest of the way.

Nappers
Jan 25th, 2009, 02:44 AM
After a scrubbing in the sink with a little Dawn, I spin them on my rotary on a low speed then max speed, then let them air dry.

I had my 7006 pad lose it's backing, and one 8006 pad get loose. Auto goop was used to fix the pads and good as new.

Tim Lingor
Jan 25th, 2009, 09:00 AM
Hey,

Just to chime in...as there seems to be some confusion in the way that pads could be dried...the following is just from my experience over the years....

Firstly, Meguiar's does not recommend washing the version #1 Soft Buff pads, but the new version #2 Soft Buff pads can be washed....

Years ago, many professionals would wash their wool pads and then dry them on the rotary polisher. Many of these wool pads, were 3M pads which were connected directly to the shaft of the rotary polisher via a specialized extender. Now Meguiar's has the W-5000 pads which uses the same style of connection. The benefit of said connection is that one now is able to spin the rotary at high rpm's to dry the wool pad.

Many professional detailers then adapted this procedure to the drying of foam pads. The original foam pads used a solid backing plate that was hard mounted to the foam pad. The connection was strong and detailers discovered that they could spin the foam on the rotary but at slower speeds. At higher speeds, I actually had one those saturated pads blow apart on me! In fact, it sounded like a gunshot as the pad just blew apart. Ooops! I was in a rush and used too high of speed, and the pad could not take the torque and the force of the rotational energy. :furious1

But when pads switched over to the popular and way more convenient Velcro attachment system, detailers began using this method of drying the foam and wool (Velcro type) pads, again with the rotary polisher. While this method will work at slower rpm's, the success is highly dependent upon how saturated the pads really are... A heavily saturated pad could start to loosen the Velcro or even fly off! Pro detailers became aware of the risk and if a pad was wrecked, they realized it was their responsibility. Just like washing version #1 Soft Buff pads. Though it was not recommended, I have always washed them but realized that if something went wrong to the Velcro I had no one to blame but myself as they were not designed for being washed.

Somewhere along the line, this piece of key information got skewed or misinterpreted and many people began using the Dual Action Polisher to dry the foam pads as well. The DA has a VERY different action to that of the direct drive rotary polisher. Hence there are several reasons why this is not a good idea:

1. The DA's oscillating action creates an enormous strain on the Velcro attachment. The action can easily cause the pad to fly off! Many people have posted on MOL and elsewhere how they had an UFO flying past them...the UFO being a foam pad! Meguiar's has always recommended to people to always start and stop the DA polisher with it's pad touching the vehicle's paint. This was to prevent splatter and to prevent the pads from flying off the backing plate.

2. As pads become saturated with product, the product will wick its way through to the Velcro on the pad and backing plate. Wet Velcro does not adhere as well, as the little hook and loops becomes saturated with product. As the pads become heavy with product, the connection is getting weaker, and again, when the pads are lifted off the paint with the DA turned on, and with the DA's strong oscillating action, the pads will often fly off...ruining a pad.

3. Over time, from the applying and removal of the pad from its Velcro, the Velcro becomes stretched and worn causing the connection to get weaker over time. At some point, the pad's Velcro and or backing plate's Velcro gets so worn that the pad has trouble staying attached with the DA even without the DA being turned on! I have had dozens and dozens of pads over the years that were so worn out from use that the Velcro just would not hold any longer! If one were to wash those pads and try and spin them dry with a DA with its strong oscillating action, the pads will certainly not stay on...

When I wash pads, I wash them carefully and then squeeze out as much water as possible by folding them like a taco. I do not twist them or wring them out as that will ruin connection of the Velcro from the foam. I then allow the pads to air dry over a few days. This is why so many people have so many dozens of pads as that way they always have enough pads to use while waiting for the others to dry...

With the new Soft Buff 2.0 pads however, I throw them into the washing machine, and then lightly dry them in the dryer, allowing them to air dry for final drying. When Meguiar's sent me pads for testing/review, I was amazed at how well the new pads responded to machine washing! I posted that review here:

http://www.meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=25376

I hope this helps! :)

Just IMHO! Scottwax2

Tim

Carfire
Jan 25th, 2009, 09:16 AM
Thanks a lot Tim for all the information.
I will try to improve my techniques so I do not ruin the small amount of pads I have.

Tim Lingor
Jan 25th, 2009, 09:42 AM
Thanks a lot Tim for all the information.
I will try to improve my techniques so I do not ruin the small amount of pads I have.

Thanks Joel. :)

Unfortunately, I found out many of those things the hard way over the years.

I hope the information was helpful! :)

Tim

CAShine
Jan 25th, 2009, 12:37 PM
I ring mine out real good then press the pad against a folded towel to soak up any residual water. Afterwards, they are left face down on a towel so the water drains away from the backing.

Carfire
Jan 26th, 2009, 08:17 PM
I tried a new method for me and it works great.
I wash the pad and the wring it out.
Then I sandwich it in between a microfiber cloth.
I does not dry as fast as with the DA, but it drys in a good enough time for me 8-10 hours.

hacker-pschorr
Mar 16th, 2009, 11:11 AM
Dry my pads? I don't even wash them. I've only been machine washing for one summer though, in case that matters.

After use I press them on a dry towel, store them in an open zip lock bag. Before use, one of the cleaning brushes from ADS is run across the face.

Looks like I need to start washing them.

onawrxhigh
Jun 1st, 2009, 05:14 PM
I have washed all of my pads a number of times. I am well aware of the possible velcro backing failures that come from washing version 1 pads( as Tim has already pointed out). Knowing this I took great care not to impart undue stress from my washing/rinsing/drying technic. This is what I do. I wash my pads in a 5 gallon bucket with cold water/ dawn and if the pad has a lot of soaked in product I will and a bit of APC to the face of the pad and scrub the pad with my hands. Then I will dump out the nasty water and keep my hose in the bucket flowing water continueously even if the bucket overflows. I will continue to rinse until there is not visible product/soapy residue coming out of the pads. I will then ring out the pad by rolling it into itself(edge of pad folded into the velcro to form a tube shape) and give it a good squeeze in my hands. This will get about 80 to 85% of the water out. I then get my Makita rotary and attach the pad and since this machine has a slow start function it will slowly ramp up to the set speed. I use a speed of about 1500rpm and hold it away from myself. I will also tap the pad with my hand when the pad is spinning being very careful not to get a finger cought in the spinning pad as this could be a real painful problem(broken finger lol). This will get the remainder of the water out of the pad leaving the surface of the pad with a slightly moist condition. I will then put the pad on towels and let the pad air dry, then repackage in the Meg's bags they came in. I hope this helps you all out.

Andrew

Eddie6th
Jun 1st, 2009, 06:22 PM
Dry my pads? I don't even wash them. I've only been machine washing for one summer though, in case that matters.

After use I press them on a dry towel, store them in an open zip lock bag. Before use, one of the cleaning brushes from ADS is run across the face.

Looks like I need to start washing them.

Never mind the pads! love that set of wheels!:drool1

Poki
Jul 26th, 2009, 08:46 AM
After reading the responses, looks like the poll should be broken down by the type of pad you have? The new soft Buff pads that are intended to be machine washed and dried (wash machine/dryer that is).....come out great that way. The time savings is a major factor here too.

Fly Bye
Nov 4th, 2009, 04:41 PM
I like the rotary technique for drying pads, but it doesn't work with an orbital cause the pad will fly off. I need a bucket with a base that I can press the pad onto so it wont fling off. If the base was just slightly below the top/opening of the bucket, the bucket would catch all the water flinging off the pad.

hacker-pschorr
Mar 20th, 2010, 06:44 PM
I know this way is not recommended, But with the 8006, or the 9006 pads. After washing them, I would put them in the dryer on medium heat. After about 20 minutes take them out and let them air dry the rest of the way.
I tried this last year, tossed all of my pads into the washer, then dryer on low heat.

They all came out fine and these were the "old" pads.

TOGWT
Mar 21st, 2010, 05:08 AM
When you remove a dirty pad from your machine, immediately place it in a bucket of water with a d-limonene (citrus) based cleaner (P21S Total Auto Wash), micro fibre detergent, or use a pad cleaner, to keep the products from drying in the pores. When you are ready to clean them, rinse well, re-wash and leave to air-dry Velcro side up on a grit guard or drying rack

Jokeman
Jul 29th, 2010, 03:53 AM
Rotary and an air compressor.

FinalTouchDetail
Jul 29th, 2010, 04:05 AM
I've never had a problem with a pad coming off of the DA when using it to dry them, but generally I'll just flip them upside down and let them air dry.

Bill Davidson
Aug 1st, 2010, 03:00 PM
I air dry my pads. I use my Grit Guards and a little basket I took from my freezer. I need to make some sort of drying rack :chuckle1

FinalTouchDetail
Aug 2nd, 2010, 02:57 PM
Same here, Bill.

My wife always complains that I have pads drying on the bathroom sink :P

Bill Davidson
Aug 2nd, 2010, 03:23 PM
My wife always complains that I have pads drying on the bathroom sink :P

:chuckle1

You can get some plastic shelving units from Costco pretty cheap. ~$30 for a 5 level plastic shelving unit. It's actually open aired on the bottom. It would be perfect for drying pads and storing products.

I think I already have about 10-15 or so plastic shelving units throughout the house, but it seems you can never have enough.

ocdetail
Oct 3rd, 2010, 07:42 AM
Yeah, I'm with Tim on this one.

In a rush to start on my 2nd vehicle of the day, I threw a just washed LC OP to the PC. Watched as the mist started spraying from the pad, then the pad seperated from the hook and loop backing. FML!