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wjfm1
Oct 7th, 2004, 05:29 AM
How do I tell if I am applying too much pressure? How to tell three pounds of pressure?

:wall: :confused:

Mike Phillips
Oct 7th, 2004, 06:12 AM
This is kind of archaic, but if you have a bathroom scale, you can simply place your hand on it and push down and practice getting a feel for a range of motions.

I suppose you could also place some plastic wrap over your foam pad, (to prevent it from becoming contaminated with any dirt particles), and then push this down on the scale to simulate what you're trying to do on your car finish.

Does that help?

Mike

Slats
Oct 7th, 2004, 04:14 PM
I read in the Porter Cable instruction booklet not to apply any pressure -- just to let the weight of the polisher do the job, is that true or is it ok to use some muscle?

Slats

Mike Phillips
Oct 7th, 2004, 04:54 PM
Originally posted by Slats
I read in the Porter Cable instruction booklet not to apply any pressure -- just to let the weight of the polisher do the job, is that true or is it ok to use some muscle?

Slats

The weight of the machine is fine for applying a polish or a wax for beauty or protection results, but to remove paint in an effort to level or flatten out the surface you must apply some pressure.

Mike

Chris Nemlich
Oct 11th, 2004, 02:28 PM
I find the amount of pressure I use depends a lot on the hardness of the paint. This isn't a real technical measurement, I just sort of get a feel for each car as I'm doing it as to how much pressure is needed to achieve the desired results.

Chris

Tim Lingor
Oct 11th, 2004, 04:40 PM
Hey,

Generally, push down on the buffer's head until the motor slightly bogs (then back-off a little) and the pad flattens out a little. Then move the buffer REALLY slow over the area, allowing the buffer to do the work!!

Tim

Marc08EX
Oct 11th, 2004, 04:54 PM
I had a lot of trouble with this topic ever since I got my G-100 and I've been asking around ever since.. The instructions of Mike is what I follow and I think they're the best thing to do to guage the amount of pressure you're applying.. Try it! I know it would help a lot! :)

Tim Lingor
Oct 11th, 2004, 04:57 PM
Hey,

In time, you will develop the "right" feel for using the buffer. I have been using the PC since the first day it came onto the market, several years ago. Up to that point, I had always used the rotary. But the ease, and the added refinement from the PC made using the product that much more worth while!! :xyxthumbs

Tim

Marc08EX
Oct 11th, 2004, 05:12 PM
Originally posted by 2hotford
Hey,

In time, you will develop the "right" feel for using the buffer. I have been using the PC since the first day it came onto the market, several years ago. Up to that point, I had always used the rotary. But the ease, and the added refinement from the PC made using the product that much more worth while!! :xyxthumbs

Tim

Tim,

That's really nice to hear.. So, how long have you had the G-100? Are there any troubles showing up or anything? Do you have your G-100 lubricated at least a year? Tom MacDonald said to have it lubricated or it will void the warranty, is this true? Thanks all.

Tim Lingor
Oct 11th, 2004, 05:36 PM
Hey,

As you probably are aware, I have been away the last month as my wife and I were moving into our new house. As such, the time I have been able to spend on MOL (during September) as the Super Moderator has been limited. But now, I am back and happy about it! One goes through withdrawl from the website! :D

Anyway, I bought my first PC about 7- 8 years ago or so. I also have a back-up PC and 3 rotaries. I have been detailing close to 20 years now! Man, that made me feel old just saying that! :(

The good new is that my PC's both the 7424 and the 7336 have never given me any trouble. I have a bit of a bearing noise in the oldest PC, but it still works just fine (it has MANY hours on it!) I would suggest that you follow the maintenance instructions to avoid voiding the waranty. Moreover, you can expect YEARS of excellent service from the G-100 (PC) ! :)

Tim

wjfm1
Nov 15th, 2004, 01:39 AM
I am getting the hang of it now thanks to all your great input. I am using #83 but I still seem to have some marks, any suggestions?

Tim Lingor
Nov 15th, 2004, 04:32 AM
Hey,

I am glad to hear that you are getting the hang of using the
G-100!! :xyxthumbs

As for the marks, it may take a couple of more passes with the DACP. But sometimes, the marks will be too deep for the G-100 and will require a rotary with an experienced user. Or, some of the marks may be too deep for removal.

My suggestion: Try a couple more passes with the DACP. Really concentrate on moving the buffer slowly and work the product until only a light residue remains. Do not buff dry! Remove with a high quality MF like Meg's Ultimate Wipe.

Please keep us posted!! :)

Tim

Mike Phillips
Nov 15th, 2004, 04:49 AM
Originally posted by wjfm1
I am getting the hang of it now thanks to all your great input. I am using #83 but I still seem to have some marks, any suggestions?


Originally posted by 2hotford
As for the marks, it may take a couple of more passes with the DACP. But sometimes, the marks will be too deep for the G-100 and will require a rotary with an experienced user. Or, some of the marks may be too deep for removal.

My suggestion: Try a couple more passes with the DACP. Really concentrate on moving the buffer slowly and work the product until only a light residue remains. Do not buff dry!

Tim


If after making a few more passes as Tim suggested, deeper scratches still remain, this is an indicator that,

1) The paint is too hard to effectively remove these scratches with the G-100
2) The remaining scratches are deeper and will require either a rotary buffer and/or wet-sanding to remove

And or both.

Mike

pdsterns
Nov 28th, 2004, 04:15 PM
Been using the pc7424 and feel like i am getting the hang of it. But the correct amount of force is still something I am trying to get the feel for. I notice when you let it run on a horizontal panel under just it's own weight there is a good deal of rotation and orbital motion, as you add weight to the pc the rotation seems to slow down and stop (orbital motion stays the same) with just a few pounds more force ie maybe five pounds. So is the right amount of force when rotation is just starting to slow? or am I better off trying to limit my force to 3lbs max or 4lbs?

Mike Phillips
Nov 28th, 2004, 07:57 PM
Originally posted by pdsterns
So is the right amount of force when rotation is just starting to slow? or am I better off trying to limit my force to 3lbs max or 4lbs?

Hi pdsterns,

Welcome to Meguiar's Online! :welcome

How much force you need to apply depends on what you're trying to accomplish. There is a balance between too much force and not enough force that to obtain the results you're looking for.

It only makes sense that when the foam pad is oscillating and rotating that more work is being done. When trying to remove defects, you need to find a balance that enables you to apply enough force to work your choice of product into the finish while hopefully still allowing the foam pad to both oscillate and rotate.

When creating beauty by applying a pure polish or adding protection with a wax you can both slow down your speed and lighten up on your pressure.

Another factor to consider is the wetness of a product. Products like the #80 Speed Glaze are very wet and you'll find your able to apply more pressure and still see the foam pad rotate. Products like the #83 Dual Action Cleaner Polish are more aggressive and you'll notice that under similar conditions, the same amount of pressure applied to the pad with #80 will stop the the #83 from rotating.

The G-100 Dual Action Polisher offers a fairly gentle cleaning and polishing action, because of this they are safe and easy to use. The other side of that coin is that because they are gentle, the are less effective at removing serious paint defects because the more serious the defect, the more aggressive some people might try to become. This then slows the rotating feature down and reduces friction. That's the safety features.

Does this help?

Mike

pdsterns
Nov 29th, 2004, 03:39 AM
Thanks Mike, I think it does. I was using #80 while making my observations and realized that you still get quite a bit of rotation with a few pounds of force. I'm thinking of putting a magic marker line on the edge of the backing plate side of the pad, then you could really see (for sure) how much rotation you have. I know you would not need that but as a new guy to the pc I think it might help me or guide me. It sounds to me like being aware of what the pad is doing and making that force/balance kind of thing is what it is all about.