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View Full Version : how much wax should i use?



Executionerhk
Apr 26th, 2009, 07:37 PM
dear guys and girls.

i have the gold class paste wax, and i really want to know how much to use and a detail run down on the steps.

i used it once and the pad was soaked with wax...
because i was twisting it too much in the can.
because i was thinking it is paste...

thanks.
Steven

Carfire
Apr 26th, 2009, 07:43 PM
I believe with paste wax you put the pad in the tin, and move it around once or twice with light pressure to collect the wax, and then apply it.
I have never really used paste wax that much, but when I have it is FUN!!
Some one else will chime in.

Andrew C.
Apr 26th, 2009, 07:49 PM
With pastes I typically tend to take the pad and lightly swipe it on the wax in a twisting motion 90 degrees, so basically just a simple twist of the hand. From there just rub onto the car in a very thin layer. No need to apply lots of pressure to the car when applying the wax, there should be enough on the pad to just rub right off.

Nappers
Apr 26th, 2009, 10:18 PM
It also depends on the paste wax.

M26 is a hard wax and may take some elbow grease to get some onto the pad....

M16 is pretty soft and doesn't take as much.

M19 is like pudding or mashed potatoes :D

NXT 2.0 is pretty soft but not too bad.

Just take the pad and go around a couple of times and if you get too much, scrape on the edge of the can.

This may help

How To Break-in a New Can of M16 (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=27884)

PorscheGuy997
Apr 26th, 2009, 10:51 PM
To apply a paste wax, I like to take the applicator and move it in a circular pattern in the wax (~5 circles). When you need more wax, just do one swipe across the surface of the paste. The first step is just to prime the applicator and really should not be repeated.

Remember to keep the wax application as thin as possible. And, only gather more wax when needed.


M16 can really differ in hardness. My first M16 is like a rock and the wax is absolutely solid. Some of my others are slightly softer. It really depends on the amount of solvent in the batch. If it is too soft, you can always boil it.

Mark Kleis
Apr 26th, 2009, 11:16 PM
Although over loading the pad in the tin can be troublesome, the key part of the application process is the spreading of the product on the surface of the vehicle itself.

If you got too much wax on the applicator just dab it around a wider area than normal, then continue to spread it evenly and thinly across the surface. Just avoid heavy, thick coats.

supercharged
Apr 27th, 2009, 01:30 AM
if you are using 1 oz of liquid wax you are using too much...1/2-2/3 is what I use.

Executionerhk
Apr 27th, 2009, 06:52 AM
i was having so much paste wax in my pad that took me almost 10min to clean it.
so even i have too much wax in the pad, it is fine as long as i apply a thin coat, is that correct? so after all i just wasted some good wax...

Mike Phillips
Apr 27th, 2009, 07:39 AM
i
it is fine as long as i apply a thin coat, is that correct?


Yes. You want to lay down a thin coating of wax over the surface. It's hard to take a picture of a thin coating because a thin layer or coating of wax doesn't show up very well in a picture.

:)

Executionerhk
Apr 27th, 2009, 08:39 AM
how do you classify if the coat of wax is thin...
thin is pretty abstract...
do i apply and just make sure every inch is rubbed once?
or i have to apply until i can see some wax on the car...

Mike Phillips
Apr 27th, 2009, 08:59 AM
how do you classify if the coat of wax is thin...




It's hard to take a picture of a thin coating because a thin layer or coating of wax doesn't show up very well in a picture.





thin is pretty abstract...
do i apply and just make sure every inch is rubbed once?
or i have to apply until i can see some wax on the car...

You want to apply and work in the way, you don't just wipe each square inch of paint with one wipe.

In our Saturday classes we show people how to make 2-3 passes over each square inch using overlapping, circular motions. Can't really show you this with my keyboard.

You want a visible layer over wax over the paint, but it should be a thin coating, not a thick coating.

Sorry, but that's about as best as I can explain/teach it with a keyboard.

Maybe do some experimenting on you car, practice makes perfect. Too thick of a coating of wax just makes it hard to wipe off, takes longer for it to dry and wastes product.

A thin coat will dry fast and be easy to wipe off. So if you're finding that it's taking forever for the wax to dry and it's hard to wipe off then that might be a sign you're applying to thick of a coating.


:)

Executionerhk
Apr 27th, 2009, 09:06 AM
i think my coat of wax was good enough before, because i just feel a little friction when i try to wipe the wax off...

i will practice, do several pass and overlaping...
i think i will use circular motion sideway, up and down and then across... to make sure everything is cover.

should i do the whole car and the go back to the starting place to wipe off the wax?

i want to say, i love you already mike LOL!!
you are very helpful!

Mike Phillips
Apr 27th, 2009, 09:18 AM
should i do the whole car and the go back to the starting place to wipe off the wax?



Maybe to start with, just do one panel, like the hood or the trunk lid. Apply the wax, allow it to fully dry before removing and the wipe-off using a clean microfiber.

Make sure you don't have any problems with one panel before going over the entire car. Dial in your technique to make sure the wax is wiping off easy after it's dried before going over the entire car.

What are you working on?
What kind of wax are you using?

:)

Mike Phillips
Apr 27th, 2009, 09:19 AM
Check out this article too...

The Swipe Test (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=2166)


How to tell when a Meguiar's wax is ready to remove


A good rule of thumb for knowing when a Meguiar?s wax is ready to remove, is to wait until the wax dries to a haze and swipes clear using the Swipe Test. In most cases, in most climates, this should be approximately 10 to 15 minutes after application. In warmer climates, it will hedge towards the 10 minute range, and in colder, wet climates, it will take longer and hedge towards the 15 and even 20 to 25 minute range. Other factors include how thick of a coat you applied, relative humidity and air flow.

Another way to test if the wax has set-up long enough besides measuring with time, is to perform the Swipe Test.



"Swipe Test"

The swipe test is where you take your clean finger, and swipe it briskly across the finish with the wax on it. If the paint is clear, without residue where your finger made the swipe, the wax is ready to wipe-off. If the area you have swiped is smudgy, or streaky, or there is noticeable wax in the swipe area, then the wax has not set-up long enough and you should allow more time for the wax to set-up before your remove it.

If you remove it before it has set-up, you will risk removing too much of the wax from the surface and thus leave less than engineered to remain behind on the finish.

Once enough time has passed and your coating of wax swipes clear, remove the wax using a clean, soft premium microfiber polishing cloth such as Supreme Shine Microfiber polishing cloths (http://meguiars.com/newproducts05/accessoryproduct_page.cfm?SKU=X-2010), or with a clean, 100% cotton, terry cloth towel like our Ultra Plush Terry Cloth towels (http://meguiars.com/newproducts05/accessoryproduct_page.cfm?SKU=X-2040),


Here's some pictures that show the swipe test

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/650/SwipeTest02.jpg

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/650/SwipeTest01a.jpg

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/650/SwipeTest01.jpg

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/500/48RollsSwipeTest001.jpg

Executionerhk
Apr 27th, 2009, 10:13 AM
Maybe to start with, just do one panel, like the hood or the trunk lid. Apply the wax, allow it to fully dry before removing and the wipe-off using a clean microfiber.

Make sure you don't have any problems with one panel before going over the entire car. Dial in your technique to make sure the wax is wiping off easy after it's dried before going over the entire car.

What are you working on?
What kind of wax are you using?

:)

i was working on a silver BMW... which is harder to show the wax...
this summer i will be working on two black car, it should be easier to see...
i was using gold class paste wax as stated on the beginning of the thread.

i like that swap test, i used it to see if the wax is dry or not...
i tested on the dark red car, before i work on the silver car...
and it was much easier to see...

Mike Phillips
Apr 27th, 2009, 10:24 AM
i was working on a silver BMW... which is harder to show the wax...


That is a tough color to see a think layer of wax over, that's where taking your time to thoroughly work each square inch as you spread the wax out and work it over the paint will help. Sometimes you can look at the surface from an angle and where there's wax and where's it's already been removed.


Best of luck on your projects...


:xyxthumbs

3Fitty
Apr 27th, 2009, 12:09 PM
Mike,

If working on a light colored car (say white) and applying your LSP with a G110, what if you KNOW you passed a particular area and you KNOW you had wax on your pad, but you really can't see any wax in the normal sunlight. Is this too thin?