PDA

View Full Version : Bissell 1425-1 Little Green ProHeat Wet/Dry Vacuum



carspainc
Oct 31st, 2004, 03:05 PM
i heard you guys talk about this little monster, i couldn't find any info in the search on how good it works and how you like using it...
do you experience a lot of 'wickering' while you use it?

Teak
Nov 1st, 2004, 07:41 PM
Try Bissell.com for more information.

Eric

carspainc
Nov 1st, 2004, 08:05 PM
thanks bro...
i was more talking about the search on this forum.

scrub
Nov 1st, 2004, 08:06 PM
I've used the heated lil bissell and a spotter/extractor. For weekend use the green machine is more than adequate. Great stain remover/ scrubber, easy to use, OK extraction capabilities, and you can leave these cool lines in the carpet.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/694DSC00111-med.JPG

The Bissell will leave the carpet/fabric slighty damp. One major weakness I've noted with the Bissell is extracting water from fabric seats. Still leaves the foam kind of too damp for client use. Maybe we used too much water.

With regards to the spotter extractor, we're still trying to get the hang of the right technique. I have noticed the floor matts we have extracted dried considerable quicker (more quicker). That's a benefit. The wand is not as compact and is cumbersome to use unlike the Bissell.

The cost difference between the two is big (spotter vs. Bissell) I'd say the Bissell is very good value.

Not to sure of "wickering". Please educate me on this one.

Hope you find this helpful. Feel free to fire away with more ??'s
Good luck!

PS The leather was cleaned with GC leather cleaner/ conditioner.

carspainc
Nov 1st, 2004, 09:50 PM
thanks for the info, there
when people talk about 'wickering' , they mean that a fabric as it dries ***** up coloration from beneath (deeper) inside the carpet, leaving a brown sort of spotting. kinda like a candle does **** up the wax through the candle wick...
when i clean a dirty carpet it looks great as long it is damp or wet ...
looking at it when it is dry, i can find brown spots on the carpet (:wall: ) they usually clean up with a damp microfiber towel ...but there's not always the time to wait til the darn carpet decides to be dry

Teak
Nov 1st, 2004, 10:19 PM
If you worried about the carpet being wet/damp and hiding spots after use, then the LGM is not the machine for you. You need a machine a powerful motor and big waterlift.

Eric

edited 16:35 est on 11-02-04

carspainc
Nov 2nd, 2004, 09:08 AM
Originally posted by Teak
If you worried about the carpet being wet/damp and hiding spots after use, then is is not the machine for you. You need a machine a powerful motor and big waterlift.

Eric

THX eric
this is the info i needed

Teak
Nov 2nd, 2004, 08:59 PM
Are you mobile or at a fixed location?
How many vehicle interiors do you complete in a day?

Eric

carspainc
Nov 3rd, 2004, 01:08 PM
Originally posted by Teak
Are you mobile or at a fixed location?
How many vehicle interiors do you complete in a day?

Eric
i am mobile and 3 vehicles is about all i can handle over a day , right now

Teak
Nov 5th, 2004, 08:06 PM
Since you are mobile I am not sure if you have generator or use clients power, which will affect the type of carpet machine you ultimately purchase. Something to consider is professional models usually require at least 20amps to operate. Professional models will provide professional results due to powerful pumps, vacuums which provide better water lift Professional extractors that I would recommend would be the following:

Century 400 Sensei, Mytee lite 8002, Mytee Speedster or HP60/100.

The machines listed above I do not have personal experience with these machines, but have read good things about them. Further I am considering purchasing one of the above within two years. These machine should leave the carpets damp after use, but the carpets should be dry within a 1/2 hour, due to the powerful vacuum motors and big water lift.

I just used my Bissell the other day and the machine did the job I asked, but the carpet and upholstery took forever to dry. As a result, after everything dried I found two small spots, which were not extracted or scrubbed well, now I have couple of spots to redo. No big deal as I did not finish cleaning the inside of my car yet.

On the subject of carpet and upholstery, not all are created equal, some clean better than others, which effects cleaning and stain removal.

One last question what carpet/upolostery cleaner are you using?

Thank you for reading my meandering thoughts.

Eric

J SOLO
Nov 6th, 2004, 03:36 PM
I have a LGPH it worked pretty good however went to use it last week it would not spray solution I took it apart no luck.The job I had todo was pretty bad carpet stains what I did was just get a spraybottle I use detailer line APC sprayed on carpet.I got a brush went over the carprt good got out the shopvac sucked up the foam.I filled another spray bottle with hot water sprayed the carpet and sucked that up with the shop vac.It worked as good as the little green ever thought of.Good luck

scottlee
Nov 6th, 2004, 05:54 PM
i have a LGCM, i have had it for 12 yearsand given me no trouble, but i only use it on my own cars and i just dont think it would ever stand up to daily abuse from a pro detailer, it does leave the areas more damp than i would like but i plan around the drying time but for the weekender it works OK i believe, here is a pic of a friends suv i did with a LGCM http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/1069IM000735-med.JPG

scrub
Nov 6th, 2004, 05:58 PM
Nice! I don't know why but I love those lines like that.

Did you have any luck leaving those lines in the front or middle row carpet?

carspainc
Nov 6th, 2004, 06:30 PM
Originally posted by Teak
Since you are mobile I am not sure if you have generator or use clients power, which will affect the type of carpet machine you ultimately purchase. ... These machine should leave the carpets damp after use, but the carpets should be dry within a 1/2 hour, due to the powerful vacuum motors and big water lift.


On the subject of carpet and upholstery, not all are created equal, some clean better than others, which effects cleaning and stain removal.

One last question what carpet/upolostery cleaner are you using?

Thank you for reading my meandering thoughts.

Eric
i do use my customers power...
the machine i should be using needs to leave the carpets pretty dry as i reall cannot afford to come back and fix any spots due to wickering .
what i found out , basically works is keeping the carpets fairly dry and use a buffer to agitate the carpet fibers... then **** the loose stuff and moisture up with my shop vac.
this will be ok on 90% of the spots
then i used a spray on more subborn stains...
but i wish there would be a better solution to my problem
BTW eric i appreciate all of your input and i am sure everyone else here is as well ...THX again

scottlee
Nov 6th, 2004, 06:50 PM
the lines in the carpet only stay till the vehicle is used, the nap gets all tramped down just like any other carpet ones its used or seats are sat on the kind of brush away, but the presentation sure looks nice when people see the car right after a detail if you look hard on the pic above you see the lines in the back of the front seats as well :xyxthumbs
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/1069IM000746-med.JPG

scrub
Nov 6th, 2004, 07:09 PM
Not really what I meant but still looks good and a good idea. I was talking about lines in the floor between the seats where the floor matts would be located (not under the seats).

scottlee
Nov 6th, 2004, 07:31 PM
yeah what i was trying to say is that the lines last about as long in the car as they do with vacuum lines in the house, once you walk through they are pretty much gone here is a pic of what i think you are looking for, the more plush a carpet is the better lines you are going to have, this truck has very thin low nap carpet http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/1069IM000777-med.JPG
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/1069IM000750-med.JPG

scrub
Nov 6th, 2004, 07:48 PM
I'm picking up what your putting down. Your pic answered my question. I understand how long the lines will last. I was wondering how you work around the obstacles. the pics says it all. I haven't tried the lines going side to side. I've tried to leave lines front to back. Doesn't work that well.

Back to topic... I used my heated extractor today with great results. I think I'm getting the hang of it. Except for the line thing!! The carpet dried real quick too.

carspainc.com---> This "wickering" thing you mentioned, I did notice the first time I used the LGM (a while back) a nice big spot showed up after drying. I went over the area again. Today I didn't see any problems after using my extractor.

scottlee
Nov 6th, 2004, 07:50 PM
to tell the truth i touch up the lines while its damp with a brush ;)

scrub
Nov 6th, 2004, 07:54 PM
cheater!! :D

I'll have to try that thanks for the tip my friend.

scottlee
Nov 6th, 2004, 08:01 PM
:rofl:

carspainc
Nov 7th, 2004, 12:17 PM
Originally posted by scrub
cheater!! :D

I'll have to try that thanks for the tip my friend.
yeah i do that touching up thing with a brush , too.
but you are right it is very frustrating when you can't get the lines real nice , because there is an obsticle or the vacuum nossle does not touch the carpet all the way...

scrub
Nov 7th, 2004, 12:27 PM
I will assume what you're talking about is as simple as getting a scrub (no pun) brush and make the designs. Or am I missing other critical elements on how to get the results like yours?? A specific kind of brush??

Thanks

carspainc
Nov 7th, 2004, 12:37 PM
Originally posted by scrub
I will assume what you're talking about is as simple as getting a scrub (no pun) brush and make the designs. Or am I missing other critical elements on how to get the results like yours?? A specific kind of brush??

Thanks
yes, you're absolutely right...
when i do my lil fancy lines , let's say on the driver site carpet (cuz that is the one with the most problems :wall: ) then i start with up and down pattern behind the pedals to the floor piece... as soon as i get enough room for the nossle , then i change to left and right pattern (it's easier to me , as i dont have to struggle with the seat) then i get my iron brush (got that name for its looks, it's plastic , though:xyxthumbs ) and go over the pattern once more . it gives it a more even look.
http://img2.imgspot.com/u/04/311/16/carpet.JPG

scrub
Nov 7th, 2004, 12:40 PM
Ok I have to ask what is an "iron brush"? Do you have a pic or link of what it looks like?

Thanks

carspainc
Nov 7th, 2004, 04:10 PM
Originally posted by scrub
Ok I have to ask what is an "iron brush"? Do you have a pic or link of what it looks like?

Thanks

this is what it looks like, although it's not the model i am using i got one from wal marthttp://www.rubbermaid.com/common/images/product/HP/G237_lg.jpg

scrub
Nov 7th, 2004, 04:36 PM
Oh I see, the iron brush. Me thinks I have a few of those lying around.

Thanks again!

Teak
Nov 11th, 2004, 01:41 PM
Originally posted by carspainc.com
i do use my customers power...
the machine i should be using needs to leave the carpets pretty dry as i reall cannot afford to come back and fix any spots due to wickering .
what i found out , basically works is keeping the carpets fairly dry and use a buffer to agitate the carpet fibers... then **** the loose stuff and moisture up with my shop vac.
this will be ok on 90% of the spots
then i used a spray on more subborn stains...
but i wish there would be a better solution to my problem
BTW eric i appreciate all of your input and i am sure everyone else here is as well ...THX again
You are welcome.

Since you are using clients house power I would look for a machine which meets the following specs:
1. Uses 20 amps or less (as this is the most common breaker/ outlet amperage)
2. Most water lift for the amperage
3. Temperature of heated water (in tank and at nozzle) (water temp can make difference with some stains and materials.)
4. Pump pressure (PSI, adjustable or non-adjustable)
5. Local service center (not really realted to clients power, but something to consider)
6. Spotter carpet machines (just another option)
7. Something made for professional and daily use

Another item to consider purchasing is a steamer to use on heavier or problem stains, before cleaning.

Eric

Teak
Nov 11th, 2004, 05:36 PM
I think this maybe the ultimate extractor, but would hate too pay the electric bill after usiing this one. Definatley for someone with a fixed location shop.

Eclipse machine (http://www.cleancraft.com/eclipse.html)

Eric

JeepZJlover
Dec 22nd, 2004, 07:35 PM
HOw many of you take atleast the front seats out when you clean the carpet? I always take them out or i fell like im half@#$ing it.

carspainc
Dec 24th, 2004, 04:23 PM
all sorts of dirt and food (drinks) end up under and by the seats . so it is really important to take the seats out whenever its feasable.

Teak
Feb 8th, 2005, 10:52 PM
Be careful when taking seats out of cars especially with newer models which may have airbags in the seat. Take precautions or you my injury yourself or have large bill for replacement.

Eric

gbackus
Feb 8th, 2005, 11:30 PM
Removing seats is also a liability issue, as is removing/replacing baby/child car seats.

Teak
Feb 9th, 2005, 01:46 AM
Originally posted by gbackus
Removing seats is also a liability issue, as is removing/replacing baby/child car seats.
I agree with you. A good example of this when I removed the front passenger seat to clean mystery stain, I forgot to label the bolts (I had a bonehead moment) and attempt to find the right under, but damaged a couple. So I had to have the bolts replaced by the service department so the seat would be properly secured to the car. Did I learn from my mistake, you bet. If the seat bolts are properly not torqued or the seat bolts are on the wrong holes, this could lead to injury of vehicle occupants and potential legal action. I would remove seats which are removed such as those in mini-vans, vans and suv's. Removing and replacing seats if done in properly coould lead to customer complaints about rattles, squeaks or seat movement. I am sure when done proplery by properly trained professionals using standard industry practices and methods 99.9% of the time there is no problems.
For child seats, what if the client/customer removes and replaces before and after detailing?

Removing seats all comes down to the following factors and probably others, your comfort level, training, focus of your business, services offered by business, limitions set forth liability/insurance coverage.


Eric

Paulvr4
Feb 9th, 2005, 05:23 AM
fyi -

i ran into the bissell little green proheat for $69.99 at Kohls. i was considering getting it - but i passed due to the fact that others mention it being too wet.

oh well - back to shop vac we go.

=0)

matt
Feb 23rd, 2005, 05:33 PM
Hey Paulvr4,

They can leave the fabric and carpet a little wet but I give it a couple of runs over to **** up the excess water and have had no major issues with it, they are not awesome but they do come in very handy and you do get the dirt out as opposed to scrubbing it in. Sometimes I am amazed at the dirty water going up the clear nozel.
I got one untill I can afford one of the more serious machines, hopefully soon! I guess my main point is that you get some pretty good bang for your buck especially because it is heated. When I worked at a dealership they had a proffesional carpet extractor but it wasn't heated so in some ways it did a pooer job than the Green Machine, there were many times when I would drive the car out and see shadows of stains still there in the sunlight.........

the main thing is not to soak any carpet and fabric unless you need to, to get the stain out and you will find it dries pretty fast. My shop is heated and by the time I drive the car out (if shampooing I start the drivers seat ASAP, to give it the longest drying time) the seats are just moist to the touch and sometimes 95% dry depending on how long the job was;)

Paulvr4
May 2nd, 2005, 12:14 PM
I picked up one - with the turbo head.

Do you guys use the detergent with it or just hot water mixed with some apc or carpet cleaner that you sprayed on? Let me know. It came with some detergent/shampoo but i'm hesitant on using it. thoughts?

thanks!

Mayur
Oct 27th, 2006, 01:39 PM
Anyone have before and after pics of floor mats? One of my rear floor mats has dried up pop stains on half of it because the crappy all weather mats slipped all the way under the seat. So half the floor mat looks brand new (light grey in color) and the other half is dark brown. Any chance I can get it clean or should I head over to the dealer to pick up new mats?