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Firstson
Jun 15th, 2009, 01:31 PM
So I did my research so this wouldn't be too redundant and there is very little on bikes on this forum. What i found was useful but I'm going to do my best to make sure I don't mess anything up.
Obviously I have a guy that wants his bike detailed and I've never touched one for anything. Besides small brushes and the like are there different cleaners I should be using for all the chrome or something softer to scrub it with. How do you go about drying all that stuff?
Do a lot of people do their paint work by hand, I'd be worried about knocking it over while using my G100 lol.
Any tips or pointers that some of you guys would normally just overlook while doin a bike I wanna hear. I wanna make sure this guy gets the best I can offer, and you guys too when I post pictures :D. Thanks guys.

Peace

Mike Phillips
Jun 15th, 2009, 02:08 PM
As far as the chrome polishing goes any quality chrome polish should be safe to use, you can apply with just about anything you would apply a car wax with, terry cloth, microfiber or foam applicator pads, the terry cloth will give you a little more scrubbing action that's safe in the chrome has any heavy build-up or film that needs to be removed.


G16108 Hot Rims Chrome Polish (http://www.meguiarsdirect.com/product_detail.asp?T1=MEG+G16108)
http://www.meguiarsdirect.com/imagesEdp/p84737z.jpg



Don't apply dressing to the tires.


As for the rest of the bike just match the right type of product for the surface being worked on and use good technique and that's half the battle. For leather use a quality leather cleaner/conditioner, for clear plastics use PlastX, for the paint follow Meguiar's philosophy of,

"Use the least aggressive product to get the job done"


The paint real-estate is small enough you can easily knock it out by hand, take plenty of foam applicator pads and some SwirlX and Ultimate Compound, do a test spot to a section and check your results and make sure the results are what you're hoping for, if not post back here what you're seeing.

If you tackle it with a dual action polisher maybe have the owner or a buddy brace the bike for safety precautions. I haven't detailed a lot of bikes but I've buffed out the paint on a number of bikes and you always need to turn the handle bars from side to side to access both sides of the front of the gas tank so a buddy can help with this to.

Be sure to cover the engine with something if you're machine polishing, don't risk getting any splatter into tight areas as it's unsightly and usually difficult to remove.

Don't use anything slippery on the seats or foot pegs for safety reasons.

That's about it off the top of my head, maybe some others will chime in...

:xyxthumbs

Tuck91
Jun 15th, 2009, 04:05 PM
After a thorough wash use an air compressor to blow water out of all those little cracks and crevices. Also bring some SwirlX, Ultimate Compound, NXT 2.0 and 6 foam applicators.

bring a bottle of chrome polish amd some PlastX too.

TLMitchell
Jun 15th, 2009, 08:28 PM
So I did my research so this wouldn't be too redundant and there is very little on bikes on this forum. What i found was useful but I'm going to do my best to make sure I don't mess anything up.
Obviously I have a guy that wants his bike detailed and I've never touched one for anything. Besides small brushes and the like are there different cleaners I should be using for all the chrome or something softer to scrub it with. How do you go about drying all that stuff?
Do a lot of people do their paint work by hand, I'd be worried about knocking it over while using my G100 lol.
Any tips or pointers that some of you guys would normally just overlook while doin a bike I wanna hear. I wanna make sure this guy gets the best I can offer, and you guys too when I post pictures :D. Thanks guys.

Peace

I use the same car wash products on my bikes as I use on automobiles. I use the good mitts and MF on paint, an old mitt, sponge or rag on the cruddy, road grime parts. You'll be picking up brake dust, rubber dust, grease and gunk working around the wheels, swingarm and down low. Start high, do the painted stuff, windshield and less grungy stuff first.

As Mike pointed out, doing the painted surfaces by hand may be a good option. Be advised, if it happens to be a Harley they have the softest clearcoat known to man (IMO). A real bear to finish well, especially their Vivid Black. Get it perfect under the halogens and hit it with a Brinkmann or wheel it out in the sun and you just wanna puke !

A blower makes short work out of drying and gets the water out of the nooks and crannies. Be prepared for scraped knuckles, there's lots of tight spots to work with.

A polishing soap like S100 or P21S is easier to use on aluminum wheels and spokes than almost anything else I've tried.

Wrinkle black engine surfaces need to be dried thoroughly or any impurities in the water crud it up once it gets hot. S100 Engine Brightener or CD2 Engine brightener really darken up the black engine, frame, wires and cables. Some people let 'em dry for the garish shine, I prefer to wipe off for a less glossy, clean finish.

If you are expected to do under the seat or any side covers where road dust and crud accumulate, have the owner remove 'em if you're not familiar. Be very careful working around electrical modules and fuse boxes. They frequently don't react well to being disturbed or having stuff sprayed on them.

NO dressings on seats, hand grips, footpegs or footboards. Anything that might cause slippage for the rider at an inopportune time could lead to disaster. No wax or anything slippery on front brake and clutch levers or brake pedal.

IF you use any kind of dressing on the tires be real, real careful not to get anything on treads, rotors or brake components. Personally, I prefer just having those things clean.

Very time consuming due to the nooks and crannies when you're intimately familiar with the bike and have a lift to keep it upright that enables you to spin the wheels. It's even more of a job if you have to move the bike to expose parts of the wheel that are hidden.

It isn't rocket surgery but if you're not familiar with motorcycles it can be a real chore. It may look smaller than your average car but there's a LOT of work there if you truly pay attention to the details.

TL

Firstson
Jun 16th, 2009, 04:30 AM
Thankyou gentlemen. I have to imagine I'll be back here frequently either with more questions or pictures of a job well done. Til then :)

Peace

steve's detailing
Aug 3rd, 2011, 09:45 AM
i have my first motorcycle detail on Friday!!! this really helped sounds like time an being careful is the key!!

daniel clark
Aug 7th, 2011, 09:35 PM
Its Sunday where are pictures?