PDA

View Full Version : Waxing directionally



Caress Detailing
Jun 21st, 2009, 10:06 PM
So I've been pondering, while reading on another detail forum. I came across many different detailers who swear by applying sealants or waxes directionally. Meaning, on horizontal surfaces they apply it side to side, while on vertical panels they apply it up and down. They never apply it circular, because they claim when light hits the surfaces it can hamper gloss.

I've seen probably hundreds of correction threads, probably at least 25% of them apply sealants or even waxes in straight motions. I believe the first time I've ever heard of this is from a friend who used Zaino, in which Zaino is the one who told him to apply it that way. But I've honestly cannot tell a difference personally applying circularly or in straight motions. :dunno

So, I consider this a "confusion" more than myth. So my question, does it REALLY make any difference in the way you apply a wax or sealant in circular motions or straight?

Carfire
Jun 21st, 2009, 10:27 PM
Never heard of that.
I do not think it can be true.
The way you apply wax is to help maintain even coverage.
It should not matter up down side to side for the panels.
Tell them to do a test their method next to the circular motion method on a black car ofcoarse with not flakes for the best test results.

Bounty
Jun 21st, 2009, 10:37 PM
So I've been pondering, while reading on another detail forum. I came across many different detailers who swear by applying sealants or waxes directionally. Meaning, on horizontal surfaces they apply it side to side, while on vertical panels they apply it up and down. They never apply it circular, because they claim when light hits the surfaces it can hamper gloss.


Funny you should mention Sal and the guys over at Zaino. About ten years ago when I was a shop assistant at Steeda here in South Florida, we started using Zaino products to prep cars for customer pick-up. And Zaino did recommend application of product this way...also using light relectivity as an underlying reason.

Although in theory it may sound plausible it would need to be conducted in both the application and the removal/buffing phase to have the product completely bonded to the surface in this directional pattern. The differences between waxes is often times subtle and miniscule...the differences between application methods even slighter. I doubt you'll ever notice a difference. I still haven't.... :dunno

Murr1525
Jun 21st, 2009, 11:03 PM
If you are applying something in a way that leaves marks behind, then it is nice if all your marks line up.

I prefer to leave no marks of course....

Caress Detailing
Jun 22nd, 2009, 12:02 AM
I doubt you'll ever notice a difference. I still haven't.... :dunno

That's exactly my point actually lol.

I have not noticed a difference at all. Infact, I like applying in circular motions because I can apply the product as thin as possible.

I just felt like bringing this topic since it is under 'Myths and Confusions' and this whole applying directionally stuff is starting to go from "Confusion" to "myth" rather quickly.

Caress Detailing
Jun 22nd, 2009, 12:03 AM
If you are applying something in a way that leaves marks behind, then it is nice if all your marks line up.

I prefer to leave no marks of course....

I know, a wax or sealant that you can actually see on top of clear coat is a wax or sealant I'm not going to use. :D

Mark Kleis
Jun 22nd, 2009, 12:06 AM
I personally prefer circular motions because I believe it will leave the best, most uniform coverage possible.

Like Murr wisely suggested, you shouldn't be leaving enough wax/sealant behind that it is going to refract light in that manner anyway.

I have heard arguments about using alternating motions when buffing with the idea that you can tell which step left marring or holograms based on where you find it, but I can't see much validity in waxing. Of course, I am by no means a scientist, chemist, or professional tester of sealants and waxes in this way.

Murr1525
Jun 22nd, 2009, 12:14 AM
I was refering more to products/applicators that would actually cause swirls, but dont want to leave streaks either.

AeroCleanse
Jun 22nd, 2009, 05:22 AM
I think its more personal preference.

Calais
Jun 22nd, 2009, 06:01 AM
Applying by machine puts the wax/sealant on in a circular motion and most people apply waxes/sealant in a circular motion by hand. I'm going to go with circular application.:dunno

Caress Detailing
Jun 22nd, 2009, 11:15 AM
I think its more personal preference.

I could agree on that, but the exception here is there are folks who spread the information like it's a "Fact."

That's my issue. Mike P.'s theory (as he is always thinking outside of the box, which I like) about WOWO application. I remember a thread where he simply asked if it really worked, and if anybody can prove to him that applying a wax using the WOWO method is the same as applying and letting it haze.

Nobody can answer.

This is similar. Those who are going around telling people "Apply it in straight lines, NEVER do it circular!" has spread enough that people actually believe in it. However, there's no actual scientific proof that it works. Even if it does, there's no visual proof that a car that has wax applied circular vs a car with straight motions.

But if you mean "Personal Preference" as in it's easier for certain people to apply it in straight motions, then I'm definitely OK with that. :D

xantonin
Jun 22nd, 2009, 11:37 AM
I think that if anything it may matter more in the direction you WIPE OFF the wax, not apply it.

Possibly wiping it off in a certain pattern may affect the way it catches any light. But really the idea of waxing is to reflect all light, not catch it.

Also, the theory on applying in straight motions is that in the event you get an abrasive particle such as dirt on your pad, you won't be scratching your finish in circles, but rather in lines where it won't be as visible as a circular defect. The reasoning behind that is that lines only catch light at one angle, circles catch the light at all angles.

But really if you're getting dirt in your pad as you're waxing.. you're doing it wrong.

Mike Pennington
Jun 22nd, 2009, 12:08 PM
Something to remember as Mark mentioned it also....

Weather applying in straight lines, circular motion, or any other direction...the most important thing to remember is apply in a
thin, uniform coat(s)....This will yield the best wipe off with the least amount of possibility for streaks.

:xyxthumbs

AeroCleanse
Jun 22nd, 2009, 12:39 PM
Something to remember as Mark mentioned it also....

Weather applying in straight lines, circular motion, or any other direction...the most important thing to remember is apply in a
thin, uniform coat(s)....This will yield the best wipe off with the least amount of possibility for streaks.

:xyxthumbs

I think the main reason for applying in lines rather than circular motions is when you come to a shut line. If you are applying in a line you can go to the edge of the panel and stop with 100% coverage. If you are applying in a circular pattern its hard to get 100% coverage without going over the shut line. Going over the shut line often leads to that nasty dried wax build up in the seams.

Personally it doesn't matter to me how you do it.

Eddie6th
Jun 22nd, 2009, 04:58 PM
I can't tell either.The only way would be to scientifically test it.I honestly don't think that it makes any difference,just makes a good bit of banter.I use circular motions aswell.That just seems to be natural to me.

beautechnique-scott
Jul 19th, 2009, 08:54 AM
i used to apply directoinally until i did a sheeting test with water on a freshly waxed surface, one side directional, one side random but even coat.............the difference is nothing it sheeted exactly the same so its very mythological IMO.
stories come out and the people get remebered for there random ramblings majority is a placeebo guys.
and as for the WOWO method ( i may seem a bit silly here but wax on wax off right? )
if this is the case ive found no problem other than the durability may be down slightly than that of with a curing time.
i find most waxes when cured are a ***** to remove unless spit shining.

NiNe STaR SHiNe
Jul 25th, 2009, 02:18 PM
they could test it in the lab just like they did NXT 2.0 and whichever other wax that was beside it (I think it was just NXT vs NXT 2.0) in that vid with Mr Barry on the 5 step paint care.