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Airborne Ranger
Nov 1st, 2004, 08:53 PM
Lately I've been giving serious thought into buying a Makita rotary. I want to invest into one for 2 reasons: Speed and results. If I was giving a car the DACP treatment, polishing pad on speed 5 with my PC, it would take me about 4 hours to do, just to polish!! c'mon people! I don't like spending half a saturday just DACP a car.

Usually when it is done, I'm sweatin like a hog and my results are only marginally better. Hence the reasons why I want a rotary and save the PC just for waxing or such. My main question is, say your using DACP on a car with the W-8006 pad at about 1500 RPM on the rotary. How long will it take you just to polish?? Thanks,,,,,,AR

SprintKing
Nov 2nd, 2004, 02:41 AM
well on a sedan i would take about 1 hour on average per layer - there are some on here that are much faster and efficient than me though

Tim Lingor
Nov 2nd, 2004, 06:49 AM
Hey,

When using a rotary, I can usually complete each coat in under an hour. However, one must be aware that while buffing time may be reduced, preparation as well as clean-up usually takes longer when using a rotary, IMHO. In the end, the time difference is not that substantial.

I use the rotary because of the finish obtainable with it. I just love the level of depth and gloss it can give to the paint!

Here is an example of how thorough I cover everything before using the rotary. I admitt, this is a little extreme. But it is surprising where you can find sling! And, even though I have used a rotary for over 15 years, I still get sling no matter how hard I try to avoid it. :D

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/6IMG_2442c_Small_.jpg

Tim

Superior Shine
Nov 2nd, 2004, 07:11 AM
Last night I polished a Ford Lighting. I stopped at 8.5 hour but could easily have used another 2-3.

Marc08EX
Nov 2nd, 2004, 07:35 AM
I also want to do the same but keep in mind that it's not an easy tool to deal with.. It requires a lot of experience and a small error would have big effects...

Airborne Ranger
Nov 2nd, 2004, 01:13 PM
Thanks guys for chiming in.

Wow 2hotford you really go the extra mile when you mask off, that's nicely done. I realize your truck is green but in that pic it almost looks like it's black, nice job!

I've been using my PC for a couple years now and I see that it does make polishing and waxing easier and spreading out product more efficiency, but I would like to step up in speed and results. I'm not the kind of guy who likes to dedicate his whole saturday just polishing his truck. I wanna be out there riding my bike or something.

Bri, I am well aware that the rotary can be a very dangerous tool to use if misused and I accept that. I have a vehicle I work on it with. 94 Grand Caravan with 167K miles. Still running strong but the paint is pretty much gone and if I do burn a spot into it, it won't be that big of a deal. So I was thinking just use that as a practice vehicle. Thanks,,,,,,,,AR

cheapthrills
Nov 12th, 2004, 08:09 PM
If you are just learing to use the rotary, you may want to step down on the polish, maybe start with #80 or #82. I would think what ever product you use with pc would be more aggressive with rotary. I'm also looking to buy a rotary and start the burning process, I mean learning process. :D


The first thing I may try with the rotary is to burn the paint, if you know what it takes to burn or do any damage, then you get a better feel and know better what to avoid. Does this make sense? Kind of like testing the water before you jump in.

Desertdawg
Nov 12th, 2004, 09:02 PM
I agree with trying to burn the paint to see just how far you can go with it. But go to a junk yard and buy a cheap hood or fender to play with.
You really don't want to expermint with your ride.

Tim Lingor
Nov 13th, 2004, 06:15 AM
Hey,

It is somewhat easy to burn the paint if you are not careful. Here is a link to Meguiar's NXT Tech Institute that was held a couple of months ago. About halfway down the first page, Mike Pennington of Meguiar's demos how to burn the paint with a rotary.

http://www.meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=2802

It takes practice to use a rotary. So I agree with the comments to find a junked hood from an auto-wrecker to practice on first. But once you get used to using the rotary, you will LOVE it!!! :xyxthumbs

Tim

cheapthrills
Nov 15th, 2004, 07:11 AM
I plan on using a scrap hood to learn using the rotary, I was afraid to take the PC to finish never mind a rotary. :rolleyes:

What are some good products and speeds to learn with?

I was thinking #80, #82 and speeds between 13-1500, does this seem relatively safe and effective? I really have no idea, The rotary seem like it's going to be a real :wall: to learn. I wish I could meet up with Rod in Jersey sometime for a quick leason or two. I think this would give me a big advantage, over me just trying to wing it.

Tim Lingor
Nov 16th, 2004, 05:14 PM
Hey,

Since you are just starting out with a rotary, I would suggest trying the #82 SFP or #83 DACP on your test panel. Meg's #80 tends to break down a little quickly making it more difficult to control with a rotary. Keep the speed to around 1300 RPM for now.

Keep us posted!! :)

Tim

cheapthrills
Nov 16th, 2004, 06:15 PM
2hotford, I'm looking to pick one up in the next 4-5 months. Being that winter is here, it would bother me if I had to stare at it without being able to use it. Thanks for the tips, I am really looking forward to learning how to use the rotary.

Tim Lingor
Nov 16th, 2004, 06:25 PM
Hey,

Do not let winter stop you!! :) Last year, I was buffing in Feb. at
-14 degrees C!!! I had to wipe the frost from each panel before I could buff the section!!! :D LOL!

Tim

cheapthrills
Nov 16th, 2004, 07:00 PM
I was actually thinking about setting up in the garage. My plan was to strap down a hood (preferable a darker color) to two horses, and go to town. But my garage is not heated, and very crowded with storage. I plan on cleaning it out over winter and when the weather starts to warm up (April or may) I'll have it out with the rotary, or is it suppose to be my friend? :D

Tim Lingor
Nov 16th, 2004, 07:15 PM
Hey,

Become one with the rotary!!! :D

Seriously, if your garage is insulated, buy a ceramic heater and use it while you are in the garage. That way you can practice during the winter. Come Spring, you will be ready to go!!!

Tim

Airborne Ranger
Nov 18th, 2004, 08:11 AM
Don't feel bad guys, The weather here is turning over to old man winter and while temp are still mediocre for detailing, the rain just will not stop!

I've convinced myself that I'm going to save the PC for waxing and light polishing(#9 #81 etc..) and use a rotary for everything else. I have patience but I also have my point of where 4-5 just polishing just doesn't fit my bill.

Something else that concerns me is couple months ago I used #82 on my Mom's Black GP (Grand Prix) Well I sure made it shine but #82 was harder than rocks to remove and when the car was out in the sunlight you could see nothing but swirls, holograms and a shiny car:wall: :wall: :wall: I'm hoping a rotary will make things easier for me in the long run and the end result that's not so scratched up:coolgleam AR

Buellwinkle
Nov 21st, 2004, 05:52 PM
I've used a rotary for years, the Makita. It usually takes me about an hour to do the whole car, some cars quicker than others. It depends less on size and more on curves. I was amazed at the class that Mike did last weekend for us and the results he got with the Meguiars DA buffer, didn't think it was possible with a DA buffer, doesn't generate the heat a rotary does. But it is considerably slower. I can get the same results with a rotary in half the time with half the product and not have the insane vibration you get with a DA. The downside of course is that a rotary will splatter more but I used a very thick product that splatters less but still splatters, no matter how careful I am. I picked up a PC DA buffer today to do my kid's convertible, it's nightmare to clean the polish splatter off the top and I'm too lazy to mask it off.

As for practice, I don't think it takes practice as much as having someone show you how to do it properly. I've shown 16 year old boys & neighbors how do it, worked with them for a panel or 2 and they finished their cars swirl free. I give them the mildest polish I have with the softest 2" thick 6" diameter pads that's hard to do damage with. I think too many people have damaged their cars with high speed rotary because of the wrong product and wrong pad. I've used 10" wool cutting pads with 3M buffing compound with good results on the right car but I wouldn't give it to a newbie.

Jimmy Buffit
Nov 22nd, 2004, 12:33 AM
I have an intern ("Rookie") working with me this week. With #83/foam/rotary/1000rpm, he has taken about 80 minutes to buff a sedan. He's doing quite well, BTW.

Airborne Ranger
Nov 22nd, 2004, 08:54 AM
That's more like it!! not no 5 hours just polishing, sorry not for me.

Don't get the impression that I want a rotary just for speed, no, the results is more what I'm after,,,,,AR

Tim Lingor
Nov 22nd, 2004, 02:27 PM
Hey AR,

As I said, I can do one coat in around an hour for an average car. But generally, that is only the first step. I usually do the same for another 1-2 steps. So now I am up to 3-4 hours on just the polishing. So as you said, saving time is not the only factor. I personally prefer the quality of the finish obtainable with a rotary! Therefore, whether it be 2 hours or 2 days, I buff until the job is done and I am satisfied with the results!! :xyxthumbs

Tim

Marc08EX
Nov 22nd, 2004, 02:34 PM
Originally posted by Jimmy Buffit
I have an intern ("Rookie") working with me this week. With #83/foam/rotary/1000rpm, he has taken about 80 minutes to buff a sedan. He's doing quite well, BTW.

Jimmy,

Can I be an intern at your shop? :D

Jimmy Buffit
Nov 22nd, 2004, 04:48 PM
Can I be an intern at your shop?

Yeah, sure! The list is growing everyday...
If you're serious, sometime in January.

Jim

scrub
Nov 22nd, 2004, 05:23 PM
Originally posted by Bri
Jimmy,

Can I be an intern at your shop? :D

This is a bit off topic but Jimmy is very generous with his time. I live in SC and went back home (Indy) to visit. I PM'd Jimmy about coming up to his shop after seeing one of his posts and the location in this forum. He welcomed me and gave me the grand tour. Thanks again Jimmy.

I would like to stop in again when we come back to visit. Next time maybe you could have a rotary class. Sorry to stray off topic, just wanted to share.

Rick

Buellwinkle
Nov 22nd, 2004, 06:25 PM
Originally posted by 2hotford
Therefore, whether it be 2 hours or 2 days, I buff until the job is done and I am satisfied with the results!! :xyxthumbs

Tim

If GW Bush was a detailer his motto would be "leave no swirl behind".