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View Full Version : Getting nowhere with this boat, another lesson learned



Tuck91
Aug 15th, 2009, 09:12 PM
Well,

A while back I did a simple wash on this boat here:

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1009/medium/DSC04825.JPG (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/showphoto.php/photo/26002/size/big/cat/)


Its a brand new boat and I detailed it before it hit the water for the first time. I figured Ultimate Quik Wax was enough since it was brand new and even later on that day I wiped it down with M135 and another coat of UQW, I did not have any Marine/RV line products at the time so I figured this would get me by until then.


Then it went in the water for the first time and was covered in water spots afterwards, the water spots were pretty bad according to the owner and he requested that I waxed it with boat wax.

After hearing this I went out and bought the following:

Marine Gel Wash
M50 Cleaner Wax
Premuim Flagship Marine Wax
Premium Flagship Spray Detailer

I was pretty confident since it had a little protection it would wash off. I also had against me the fact that it sat for two weeks before I got it again.

After washing it many of the water spots washed away but some etched into the surface. And keep in mind the most aggressive product I had was M50 on the D.A ,I even clayed with the mild blue clay after washing. M50 would not make a dent in the small water spots, but it did the bigger ones.

The owner says it looks great even in sunlight but I can still see them a little when I kneel down and look.

What should I use?

a more aggressive product/straight cleaner such as M44?

OR

The Marine Line Hard Water Spot Remover


But I do know this:


Lesson learned: Use a good quality Boat/RV wax before it hits the water.

Carfire
Aug 16th, 2009, 07:49 AM
I do not do Marine Stuff, but I would try the water spot remover first.

Poki
Aug 16th, 2009, 08:07 AM
There is a water spot remover sold for the Marine industry called Ducky Water Spot Remover. Only found in Marine stores or they can order it for you. I sell this product in our RV store because the resort we are in has horrible irrigation water that spots cars and RVs. This is a fantastic product and easy to use. Spray on, let sit, wipe off with damp chamois. It WILL get the spots but if there is severe etching of the surface.... :confused:

Tuck91
Aug 16th, 2009, 10:26 AM
I think Meguiars makes a Water SPot Remover in the Marine/RV line.

Andrew C.
Aug 16th, 2009, 03:47 PM
Well it kinda depends on the actual water spot. I believe that the Marine Line Water Spot Remover is a QD of sorts that is formulated to remove above surface water spots. If these spots truly did etch into the paint of the boat then it isn't going to do anything. Then you will have to hit it with something that has an actual cut to it.

Go ahead and take some of your products for your cars and use it on the spots in test spots to see if it makes a dent. Chances are M105 may not even make a dent since gel coats are typically pretty hard. However if it works, then you are set. If it doesn't, then you are going to need to step up to a compound in the Marine Line that is formulated for gel coats which are extremely hard.

Let us know what happens!

Tuck91
Aug 16th, 2009, 05:55 PM
Thanks guys,

Well, I am going to do some test spots with some automotive cleaner/polishes and if that doesnt work I may have to step up to Marine line compounds like Andrew suggested.

Hopefully the D.A and the Marine Line cleaners and compounds can handle this. Since I dont have or know how to use a rotary.

Michael Stoops
Aug 17th, 2009, 07:06 AM
On a new boat like this one you should be good to go with M105. When you start dealing with older boats that have an oxidized surface, you really should step into the Marine/RV products. Gel coats are not only much harder and thicker than automotive paint, but also much more porous. When the surface becomes oxidized the pores open up and they can just drink in product, especially product not designed with gel coat in mind.

When waxing it's always best to stick with a wax/sealant designed for gel coat use. Sometimes we'll see a yellowing of the gel coat when an automotive wax is used, and this is simply due to the differences in the coatings. It doesn't happen all the time, or with all waxes, but it is common enough that we recommend sticking with a Marine/RV wax when working on gel coat.

Brad777
Sep 23rd, 2009, 10:42 AM
On a new boat like this one you should be good to go with M105. When you start dealing with older boats that have an oxidized surface, you really should step into the Marine/RV products. Gel coats are not only much harder and thicker than automotive paint, but also much more porous. When the surface becomes oxidized the pores open up and they can just drink in product, especially product not designed with gel coat in mind.

When waxing it's always best to stick with a wax/sealant designed for gel coat use. Sometimes we'll see a yellowing of the gel coat when an automotive wax is used, and this is simply due to the differences in the coatings. It doesn't happen all the time, or with all waxes, but it is common enough that we recommend sticking with a Marine/RV wax when working on gel coat.

Thanks for the advice Michael. I was about ready to layer M56 with some NXT2.0. I was thinking some extra hydrophobic quality would do it good, but I sure don't want to take the chance of the surface yellowing. I suppose another layer of M56 will be the ticket.

Michael Stoops
Sep 23rd, 2009, 11:11 AM
Brad, if you're going to spend the time to apply a second coat of wax, do yourself a favor and use Flagship Premium Marine Wax. A second coat of M56, while perfectly fine in and of itself, just isn't going to give you the same longevity as Flagship, and probably not the overall shine either.