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Airborne Ranger
Nov 18th, 2004, 07:22 PM
Ok I have an older B&D rotary and I have found a way to convert it to velcro. Problem is not only is it a 2speed but the lowest setting is 1850RPM and then highest is 2400 RPM I'm really iffy about using this thing. Would 1850 be too fast with Meguiars compounds and polishes??

If all else fails I can just keep it for a sander and buy a new Makita or something?? AR

Mike Phillips
Nov 18th, 2004, 07:55 PM
Originally posted by Airborne Ranger
Ok I have an older B&D rotary and I have found a way to convert it to Velcro. Problem is not only is it a 2speed but the lowest setting is 1850RPM and then highest is 2400 RPM I'm really iffy about using this thing. Would 1850 be too fast with Meguiar's compounds and polishes??

If all else fails I can just keep it for a sander and buy a new Makita or something?? AR

1800rpm is the fastest speed Meguiar's recommends for applying products and this is actually kind of fast. At these speeds, on wrong move, or staying in the same place for too long and... whoops!

I've heard of people that have used some type of current reducer to reduce the power going to the buffer which has the effect of slowing it down. This might be an option you can look into. A while back someone posted a link to a rotary buffer that could be purchased for some ridiculous low prices and Jimmy Buffit chimed in and stated he's had good luck with them?


http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/2CheapBuffer-med.jpg

Might be worth a try.

Mike

Airborne Ranger
Nov 18th, 2004, 09:13 PM
I've never heard of such a thing called a current reducer??? Sure I can look into it.

The price for that rotary shown makes my B&D look like a rip off! I got mine at an auction for $22! Thanks Mike,,,,AR

Tim Lingor
Nov 19th, 2004, 04:36 AM
Hey AR,

I would bet that your old B&D is a heavy duty unit!!!

As Mike mentioned, 1800 RPM is the max speed. I use the rotary at 1750/1800 RPM for my compounding work etc. But, as he also said, a slip at this speed is a real WHOOPS!!! :wall: However, the results can also be awesome. It is a double edged sword! :)

Tim

Mike Phillips
Nov 19th, 2004, 06:28 AM
Here's the thread from the original post...

bought a polisher (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=3309)

Mike

Airborne Ranger
Nov 19th, 2004, 08:45 AM
2hotford, I was thinking the same thing about it being a HD unit.

Here's what I was thinking to modify it to get it work for me. I'm not a full time detailer but I do like to do things on weekends.

Backing plate: This is made of rubber and it is also extremely dirty with oil, grease and small gritty stuff imbedded into the rubber plate, so I'll have to do some serious cleaning to the backing plate before I go putting my pads on there. I was comparing size of the backing plate to my pads and the backing plate is ever so larger than the pads themselves. So in order to get it to size I was thinking of having my uncle who has a whole shrine of dewalt tools and have him size down the plate to about the same size as my Meguiars velcro backing plate for my PC. The backing plate on my B&D is 7" round and have him trim it down. Then adhesive on some velcro strips and viola! instant backing plate.

I was also thinking of looking into this "current reducer" like I said, I've never heard of such a thing so I'm going to do some research on this.

Another thing, the rotary leaks oil and so the rotary itself is very dirty and greasy from the motor. The more I think about it, the more I question is it even worthy of using:confused: :confused: :confused: Just keep exploring options for now,,,,,,,,AR

Tim Lingor
Nov 22nd, 2004, 02:31 PM
Hey AR,

The backing plate on your buffer is not removable? If it is, I would just buy the correct backing plate. You really do not want to risk using a home-made backing plate with the speed and the heat the rotary can develop. It could lead to a major....WHOOPS!

Cheers! :)

Tim

Airborne Ranger
Nov 23rd, 2004, 04:25 PM
2hotford, the backing plate is removable on my rotary. Below is a pic of it. The thread size is 3/8" and the threads are on the inside of the shaft. Hence why I have to do some mods to it.

I've come to the conclusion I'll just keep it around for a sander and grinder, I just feel to iffy and uncomfortable about it. That too when I rev it 2400RPM, it makes some pretty wicked noises so who knows the condition of the motor. Here's a pic of the backing plate and shaft to my rotary. The pictures show it's blue but it's actually green,,,,,,,AR
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/149rubber_plate_and_allen_bolt-med.JPG
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/149rotary_shaft-med.JPG

Tim Lingor
Nov 23rd, 2004, 05:35 PM
Hey AR,

I have seen those internal threaded rotaries before. The problem is, most backing plates are designed for 5/8" external threaded buffers.

In the end, I hate to say it, but you may be better off just keeping it as a sander and purchase the proper Makita, Dewalt etc rotary instead. That way you are also learning at the proper speeds, and can have access to the proper backing plates and pads. :)

Tim

Airborne Ranger
Nov 23rd, 2004, 07:30 PM
2hotford,

Yea I was thinking the same thing. I suppose you wouldn't want it would you?? no j/k;) I really like the looks of the Makita compared to my B&D and just looks easier to control with that handle that goes over the top of the rotary like that so you can use 2 hands. Thanks,,,,,AR