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View Full Version : Which new product would be of interest to you?



Mike Phillips
Dec 1st, 2004, 10:58 AM
We would appreciate your feedback, comments and suggestions on the topic or washing your car.

Thank you for participating in our poll! :xyxthumbs




Question 3

You can select more than one answer in this poll

If Meguiar's launched the products below to reduce hard water spots when washing and drying your vehicle, which would be of interest to you? (select all that apply)

scrub
Dec 1st, 2004, 04:11 PM
Hi Mike.

I voted for the engineered soap. Just like the Mr Clean Autodry thingy, I don't like the idea of having to buy extra stuff just to wash a car. I can deal with soap, wash mitt, wax... Plus I'd burn through the limited amounts of washes the equipment would provide and have to order more stuff more frequently. That's great for your company though. In addition having the wash would be easier to carry to different locations rather than more equipment I'd have to hook and unhook. I know it would probably wouldn't take long to hook up.

What would this premium soap with nano-technology cost compared to the filtration device? I'm not asking for a real specific price more like a ballpark. For example the soap would be less than $15.00 and the filtering device less than $30.00. Price would also influence my decision.

That's my .02. Thanks.

RamAirV1
Dec 1st, 2004, 04:35 PM
I voted for the engineered soap too. NXT Car Wash helps to reduce water spots.

Rather than use a filter, I just hook my car wash hose up to the ater faucets in the garage that are on soft water. It does reduce hard water spotting.

RamAirV1

Unreal
Dec 1st, 2004, 05:19 PM
Voted for the wash too.

As I am always battling hard water spots :wall: :wall: :wall: :wall: :wall:

Rockpick
Dec 1st, 2004, 05:45 PM
Any of the above would be WONDERFUL!!!

Bill Prentice
Dec 1st, 2004, 06:28 PM
I'm a belt and suspenders type of guy... Water spoting especially in warmer weather is a real drag. So if I can take multiple steps to prevent an adverse effect or outcome I will. The filtration and soap combined would most likely cover a larger area of possible spotting causes than either one individually...

Bill Prentice

P.S. Mike hope you and your family have a great holiday season.

00Ranger
Dec 1st, 2004, 08:05 PM
Another vote for the wash:)

I don't want to have to grab a handful of things, attach filters etc...just to wash my car. It already takes me long enough being careful not to marr(sp) the finish.:D

dcswd
Dec 1st, 2004, 08:23 PM
I would want some sort of filter... but nothing like the Mr. Clean Auto dry system. I would want something more industrial like. But that would put it out of the price range of most buyers (including me :wall: ) :D

cwcad
Dec 2nd, 2004, 03:18 AM
i too, voted for the wash product technology. have tried the Mr. Clean system and found it obtrucive to my system of washing.

i am a kiss(keep it simple stupid) kind of guy. a high tech wash soap would be extremely attractive to me and other consumers.

Aurora40
Dec 2nd, 2004, 06:10 AM
Heh, I'm noticing a theme. I'd use a filter that had good capacity, but I really wouldn't like a soap that did other stuff. I'd think to suspend all the minerals in water, it would be a detriment to its ability to lubricate and to buffer dirt particles. I'd be using up a lot of its energy on the water itself.

But if you sold a filter with lots of capacity, I could actually fill my bucket up with filtered water. My soap would work better, and no bad water would be introduced on the paint for me to later try to displace. I'm not talking filling up two 5-gallon buckets, but maybe 3 gallons of total wash/rinse water.

As someone who keeps thinking about pulling the trigger on a filter, I'm very glad you all are considering it. One big uknown with them is how long they tend to last in the real world. The places I'd contacted were pretty vague about it. I'm sure using nothing but filtered water would shorten the life of a filter a lot, but if it were good for 5-10 washes like that, I'd be sold. The Mr Clean filter that came with it seemed ok for two rinses, but they were just rinses (and the car was not 100% spot-free even using the soap). They claim the replacement filter can do 10 cars, but I find that highly dubious, and of course the "final rinse" with that thing probably puts about 1-1.5 gallons of water on your car total, so that's not a very high-capacity filter.

I'd be willing to spend about $2-4 per wash on just the filtering part, not including the initial hardware purchase *provided that I could use it for the whole wash process*. If it were only a final rinse, $2-4 for a final rinse wouldn't make sense to me. But if it's gonna be closer to $4, then I would expect lots of ease of use. :)

So basically, I'd flip out over a filter that could clean 50-100 gallons of not-incredibly-hard water and cost $30 or less. And if it had a nozzle with a few volume selections of spray, that'd be icing! Maybe a high fanned one for rinsing, a medium/high pointed one for spot rinsing with more vigor, and a low fanned one for rinsing off the soap. I dunno, something like that. I look forward to see what you come up with. But in my opinion, better water will make everything work better. Better soap only makes soap work better, and only at that one thing. :)

As an aside, to put a context, I can get distilled water for $.55-.66 a gallon from Wal-Mart (less convenient) or the grocery store (more convenient and a little more money). And my garden sprayer was $30. But the ease of use isn't there as I have to drag it out, fill it up, pump it up, carry it around the car, then dry it out and clean it before putting it away. If I used distilled water in my buckets too, I'd use about 5 gallons of water total, but still wouldn't be able to do the power rinsing or even rinse off soap due to the weak stream and very very low volume flow.

DCDS
Dec 2nd, 2004, 07:05 AM
I voted for the soap. Tried the Mr. Clean system and didn't like it. 1. Didn't like washing with cold water.
2. Didn't like waiting for the water to dry on its own.
3. Still had spots unless I went over the car twice with the ionized rinse water.
I think the simpler you keep it, the better

scrub
Dec 2nd, 2004, 04:02 PM
As a disclaimer... I was not implying the Auto Dry system doesn't work. I have yet to try it. I was comparing the concept of purchasing additional items to simply wash a car. I'm sure everyone knew that. Just wanted to clarify that point. I'm sure the Auto Dry works great for some folks...

Thanks :D

jchetty
Dec 2nd, 2004, 06:49 PM
personaly, i like the idea of a filter...maybe you guys can market it with an optional quick disconnect it can be removed easy...i have quick disconnect for all my car wash stuff and i love them.:xyxthumbs i like to have task specific items, and while i know that if you guys make a new shampoo it will rock...I use a shampoo that i have great results with and the water softener adder wouldnt make me switch...and if you guys add like a color changer so we know when to change the filter that would rock:bounce what car nut couldnt use another toy:db:

thejazzguy
Dec 7th, 2004, 02:34 PM
Add one more vote for the soap. :db: Like Scrub said, I don't want to have to buy filters and stuff just to wash my car. Plus microfibre towels are great for drying the car (making that part of the process not that unpleasant.)

Beercan31
Dec 7th, 2004, 06:21 PM
Originally posted by Aurora40
Heh, I'm noticing a theme. I'd use a filter that had good capacity, but I really wouldn't like a soap that did other stuff. I'd think to suspend all the minerals in water, it would be a detriment to its ability to lubricate and to buffer dirt particles. I'd be using up a lot of its energy on the water itself.

But if you sold a filter with lots of capacity, I could actually fill my bucket up with filtered water. My soap would work better, and no bad water would be introduced on the paint for me to later try to displace. I'm not talking filling up two 5-gallon buckets, but maybe 3 gallons of total wash/rinse water.

I was thinking the same thing.

Bill D
Dec 9th, 2004, 05:28 PM
Filter device only. I'm not interested in anything where I must buy the accompanying wash only

txz28
Dec 16th, 2004, 06:04 PM
Originally posted by Bill D
Filter device only. I'm not interested in anything where I must buy the accompanying wash only

I must agree. Although, I don't know if hard water is a big enough of an issue with me to worry about it, and yes, I have hard water.

yndio
Feb 2nd, 2005, 02:43 PM
Here in Kansas City, KS we have VERY hard water and I have a black truck. You do the math. Keep us posted on if anything is being worked on.

SingingSabre
Feb 8th, 2005, 10:09 AM
Both. I would love a car wash that focuses on hard water (I didn't get NXT because the place I was at didn't have it...and I was really tired of driving around town).

Also, a filter would just be gravy on top of that.

If said filter was developed, I think it would be nice to have some sort of switching system. It'd be nice to be able to switch from filtered to unfiltered water by pulling a lever or something.

2000
Mar 31st, 2005, 04:31 PM
soap alone is easiest...but I'll take what ever works .:xyxthumbs

Estranged
Apr 8th, 2005, 09:55 AM
I think simply adding some ingredients to your already great car wash soaps (I use GC and Deep Crystal personally) would be the best way to do it...

"NEW Gold Class Car Shampoo now with Hard Water Spot Inhibitor"

Scottwax
Apr 22nd, 2005, 08:05 PM
What Bob (Aurora40) said.

I've tried the Mr. Clean system and while it doesn't dry completely spot free, it does buy you some time on warm days so you can dry the car before it spots. The problem is the unit is awkward and I really don't like the soap. I've ended up using either NXT or Gold Class (whichever is on sale ;) ) to wash the car and the Mr. Clean filtration system to rinse....and of course, since the filter really doesn't fit in well without leaking, I have to remove the bottom cover and physically hold the filter in place so it doesn't leak.

I know Meguiars can do better than that! :db:

jks79ta
May 9th, 2005, 12:04 PM
I'm gonna agree with estranged on the gold class with hard water inhibitor. Here in my area hard water is the only way. Suprisingly depending sometimes on which side of the highway you are the water is either real hard or not bad at all. I get to find out about the water where my new house is being built soon.

JeffM
May 9th, 2005, 01:09 PM
I spent 5k on a home water system and still get spotting. There is one more thing i can put inline to reduce it, but other than rev. osmosis, im not sure spot free water is completly possible.

If i wash early in the morn. or at dusk, no spots, stay out of the sun :wall:

Anyways, i vote for anything new from Megs., dont care what it is, keep em' coming :xyxthumbs

utricky1
May 23rd, 2005, 01:47 AM
What if you just used a microfiber towel and dried your car before the water spots became an issue? :confused: It works very well for me. Hope that helps.:xyxthumbs

gb387
Aug 4th, 2005, 05:54 PM
Originally posted by utricky1
What if you just used a microfiber towel and dried your car before the water spots became an issue? :confused: It works very well for me. Hope that helps.:xyxthumbs

Sometimes no matter how fast you try to dry your vehicle you still end up with hard water spots... at times they can be hard to remove. Also any water that runs out of a crack driving down the road leaves a streak on the paint.

RamAirV1
Aug 5th, 2005, 05:10 AM
Originally posted by gb387
Sometimes no matter how fast you try to dry your vehicle you still end up with hard water spots... at times they can be hard to remove. Also any water that runs out of a crack driving down the road leaves a streak on the paint.

How true!

:iagree:

That is why it takes longer to dry the car than to wash it, at least for me! I would think all you F-body owners out there would agree with me! All those nooks and crannies, the rear bumper.....drip......drip.......drip! It's all worth it though for an F-body.

My goat doesn't have quite so many places that release water drops after the car is dry, but it has a few.

RamAirV1

Xtreme99_s-Dime
Aug 5th, 2005, 06:17 AM
I would really use both, the soap and the filter. Although it would be expensive, it would make my drying alot less stressful. Also it would keep me from Quik detailing right after my truck gets dry (to get rid of the spots)

sixty7mustang22
Aug 5th, 2005, 07:01 AM
I am interested in ANYTHING that would help prevent hard water spots.:xyxthumbs

RamAirV1
Aug 5th, 2005, 07:47 AM
I'm not a chemist, but it's gotta be hard (no pun intended) to make a product that can prevent or eliminate hard water spots without affecting the sealant/wax coating on a car. If Meguiars can somehow accomplish this, I will be impressed.

Even a product that can quickly and easily eliminate hard water spots by hand without scratching or swirling paint would be great, even if re-waxing was required.

RamAirV1

GTScott
Aug 10th, 2005, 02:39 AM
A wash that helped with hard water spotting would be great. I have seen a number of the in-line pieces that claim to prevent this and most just seem to cut down on pressure. I suppose though, if you don't have enough pressure to wash the car then you probably won't have spots either!

-GT

DodgeStratusR/T
Sep 7th, 2005, 02:02 PM
A wash that prevents spotting wouldnt be practical. Because what makes the spots is rinsing and the soap isnt gonna help the rinse water. Id like an actual filter. Thats the only option that actually makes any sense.

roushstage2
Sep 7th, 2005, 05:07 PM
I voted for the water filtration piece. Nxt car wash is already engineered to reduce hard water spots. I don't know if I would want to buy another car wash. I would rather have something to use in conjunction with the car wash soap that I already have to hep further reduce the hard water spots.

My .02 cents

Jeff Smith
Sep 7th, 2005, 06:51 PM
I am not a detailer for hire but just an owner. For my purposes a shampoo would be fine. I tend to use the Electric Leaf Blower to blow of my vehicle and I try to leave just enough water to privide the water magnet just a touch of "Lubrication". I have tried Mr. Clean's Autodry system and find with my local city water that I can only get about 3 good rinses before the filter starts turning brown. They are supposed to last about 10 rinses but I guess it depends on your particular water. So for me, it is not worth going trough that many filters. Too bad a more permanent filter can't be designed that might allow back-flushing of some sort. Or possibly even some sort of removable filter media that could be bought in bulk to go along with a filter housing that can be opened to allow replacement of the filter media

Shiny Lil Detlr
Sep 19th, 2005, 05:57 PM
The one product for washing that I use all the time now (rarely use any "normal" wash soap anymore due to the hassle with drying) is ProtectAll's Quick and Easy Wash. I would LOVE to see Meguiar's come up with a similar product that didn't require me to use as much product or water to get the job done.

In any case, I voted for all three, because I know that whatever Meg's comes out with, will be far better than the Mr.Clean products. I tried AutoDry exactly one time, and proceeded to give it away to a friend who doesn't really care much about his car. I figure at least this way he's keeping the dirt off.

sneek
Nov 15th, 2005, 05:46 PM
i picked the last one
nxt and a filter would ensure only "soft"water touches your car !

blkbmw
Nov 18th, 2005, 12:34 PM
I would like to see both the filter and the wash. I would feel more confident in a system that helps reduce spotting while washing (car wash) and rinsing (filter) my car. I don't have much faith in an "all in one miracle product". If you would just offer the wash, then I would wonder if the effect would be diminished when I mix the wash solution with my unfiltered water.

Also, an added advantage to offering both would be for consumers that might wash their cars eslwhere (car shows, while on vacation, etc.) They could take the car wash with them. Even though you might not get the full reduced spotting benefit, there would still be an advantage in just having the wash. I know that when I go to the beach, the hotel I stay at allows guests to use their hose to wash cars and alot of guests take advantage of this.

Jason

Imclean
Nov 18th, 2005, 01:54 PM
I'm looking for something that would allow me to wash my cars in direct sunlight on a 90 degree day and not worry about the sun drying the car before I'm finished washing the other side. I wash twice a week and quick detail almost daily. I have outside parking both at the condo and my warehouse, plus I use the truck to do sales calls (hence the reason for daily QD). I still wipe down the areas that have been sun dried but I either use a saturated Water Magnet to re-wet the area and follow it with a dry WM or I use a QD with a dry WM.

danielsan
Jan 9th, 2006, 06:14 PM
I like my #62 and I like buying it in gallons so only the filter for me, but I'm sure I'm not in the majority on this. Realistically, I wash in the shade and have gotten pretty good at drying, so I doubt it would largely impact me. As an aside, a co-worker of mine (before I had the chance to give him the fire-and-brimstone sermon about the evils of drive-thru's, $10 hand car washes, and gimmicky infomercial junk) bought the Mr. Clean system and was not impressed with either the performance or the quantity of product for the price. I doubt much can be done for someone who washes their car in 90 degree Houston with 90% relative humidity in the sun using Houston tap water.

Freeway Flyer
Jan 11th, 2006, 06:04 AM
Filter, Please! A hose end filter about the size of a can of frozen orange juice, would travel easy.

Murr1525
Jan 24th, 2006, 09:29 AM
A filtration piece built into a foam gun... now we're talking... :xyxthumbs

tron1974
Feb 1st, 2006, 09:31 AM
I've used the Mr Clean one before and it seems to work okay. The big issue is that the filters and soap were so freaken expensive and the nozzle didn't have a great spray on it.

will20four
Feb 16th, 2006, 07:36 PM
i voted for the last one. it would be nice to have the choice of either. though i like the idea of just the soap, like mentioned before, but i already use the NXT soap that helps prevent it some so now filtering the water is next. so i say both. cost would be a factor on the filters too.

Cadude
Apr 10th, 2006, 10:20 AM
I'm all for modifying soaps so they rinse off with less spotting, but I don't need no more stinkin' gadgets just to wash the car. :)

I'm going to dry the car the old fashioned way anyway, so a filter would not be of interest to me.

STG
Apr 25th, 2006, 01:25 AM
There's little sense in voting for one option without knowing:

WHICH ONE WORKS BEST?

I'd buy the product(s) that actually work.

Ideally, I'd like a filter I can attach to my garden hose that's the size of a soda can which will enable me to wash my car at high noon in the Mojave Desert in 125 degree direct sunlight using industrial waste water. Retail price $9.95 with replacable cartridges good for 10 - 20 washes at $3.99. Of course, that's presuming I drive about 1,000 miles to the Mojave Desert.

But, that ain't gonna happen.

35th Anniversary SS
Apr 25th, 2006, 08:58 PM
I would find it very hard to believe that a soap could be developed that could eliminate hard water problems. Reason being is that this soap may or may not work 100% depending on your water source. There is some naaaaaasty water out there... and some consumer is going to buy this product based on the Meguiars name with high hopes. If that consumer has really bad water... and this dont work on a summer day.... *insert bad taste in mouth*. :D Consumer spreads word.... word of mouth hurts Meguiars... consumers buddy buys Mr.Clean product that looks like a laser tag gun on steroids with a water hose attached to it. :D

A filter, on the other hand, would be great... it could be attached to the nastiest water you can find and it would do its job... just wouldnt last long as long as Joe Shmoe lucky enough to have "not so hard" water. Once its reached its limit.. crappy water or not... youll know when to expect hard water issues based on filter useage, which I assume would have some kind of guide to show when the filter is spent.

Id deffinately buy a filter.. especially with a Meguiars name on it.

*note: I currently own a Mr.Clean Autodry.. Ive NEVER been able to let my car dry completely on its own. I always freak out and start toweling off before its done drying. Honestly.. with a Mr.Clean name on it and given everything Ive been taught on car washing.. I cant stand back and let it do its thing.

Sorry for the long winded post. :D

TrufflePig
May 10th, 2006, 08:10 AM
i'm all for the soap.

having to buy extra attachments won't go over with my old man who already has 10 different ones for his garden and flowers.

i could only imagine if i told him i'd have to keep switching them all for car wash.

he already barely understands the purpose of all this work i do to maintain them.

indigo s10
May 21st, 2006, 03:36 PM
I like the soap idea. I don't like the whole idea of was, then filter, then rinse. I just want to wash, rinse, dry, and then polish/wax procedure.

xebola
Jul 10th, 2006, 04:49 PM
I would love a filter that had an element that could be recharged in an oven, or with some inexpensive, readily available chemical.

foxhound58
Jul 12th, 2006, 06:40 AM
I voted for the soap only. It would help on the low humidity days.
I would not pay extra for it. I will usally use final inspecton or QD after it is dry anyway. That takes care of any spots on it that dried on.

F-150
Jul 24th, 2006, 12:34 AM
should just have a water filter that hooks in line like the Spot Free system does. then you wouldn't need any special soap, combination of the two, or replacment filters.

WaspHunter
Jul 24th, 2006, 06:02 AM
I voted for the soap because of local water restrictions preventing us from using anything other than a high-pressure hose here.

rascal
Jul 25th, 2006, 08:05 PM
Gee...I don't have any problems with hard water spots here in the MS, but I would vote for the soap. I have had my fair share of fighting hard water spots in the past. Washed my friends car one time in Chicago and it was spotting before water had a change to roll off the car. :wall:

drcZ28
Oct 3rd, 2006, 06:55 PM
i vote for the soap. we live in the city, and our water has all kinds of junk in it.

I have the Mr. Clean hose attachment, and never ever use it, so i would hate to buy something else like it from meg's and watch it sit.

On the other hand, i always use soap to wash the car (duh)

cute02spec
Oct 4th, 2006, 07:41 AM
I voted for just the soap. I live in an apartment with no hose access, unless I get a really long one and hook it up to my sink and hang it out the front door. So intead I use buckets of water to rinse my car usually... so a hose attachment would not help me out all that much.

Ringwraith
Jan 8th, 2007, 07:12 PM
Wow this thread is two years old! :D Any point still voting?

I voted anyways, for the filter attached to the hose.
What's the point of having a special soap made? What happens when you rinse the soap away? More spots:confused:

I'd rather have a device that fixes the problem at the source. That way you can fill up your buckets & use whatever soap you want and rinsing isn't an issue.

Cheers
Sean

chessplayer
Jan 17th, 2007, 12:16 AM
car wash that prevents hard water spots is my choice,they definetly are a true problem......

Thejoyofdriving
Apr 10th, 2007, 09:29 AM
I think a filter with a special soap would be nice.

Wolf-Strong
Apr 10th, 2007, 01:17 PM
I would prefer a filter system for one simple reason:

While a soap would definatly help prevent water spotting, what happens when you go to rinse down the car?

I would rather have a system that gets rid of the hard water all together (especially down here in San Diego!). That way, I could use whatever car wash soap I wanted and not be stuck with just using one type of soap.

Paradox
Apr 12th, 2007, 04:52 AM
Yes, an old thread but whatever. The kids bought a Mr. Clean Auto dry for me when I bought the new car. It works ok, but I would prefer an in-line filter on the hose. Planning to go to the local hardware to see if I can rig something up
to my hose from the plumbing department.

J. A. Michaels
Apr 14th, 2007, 10:13 AM
I would prefer a filter system for one simple reason:

While a soap would definatly help prevent water spotting, what happens when you go to rinse down the car?

I would rather have a system that gets rid of the hard water all together (especially down here in San Diego!). That way, I could use whatever car wash soap I wanted and not be stuck with just using one type of soap.

:iagree: Excellant point.

Wolf-Strong
Jan 19th, 2008, 09:43 PM
For the traditional wash, I still have the same point of view. However, when it comes to doing an Optimum No-Rinse car wash, I just absolutely love it! It has become one of the few non-Meguiar's products that I use, mostly due to the fact that I live in an apartment complex meaning no access to a hose.

I am also revisiting the sponge as a wash media when washing well maintained cars. It seems to me to be a very effective way to wash the car and I am beginning to think it is a great combination for a car that is well maintained with ONR. However, if the car is anything beyond just mildly dirty from a week or so of driving on the paved roads (no dirt roads!) than you do have to do a regular wash.

cafemoc
Jan 30th, 2008, 11:47 AM
I have enough space to wash/dry cars, but it would be nice if Meguiar's can make spot free water/wash system, so I can just blow dry entire car.
I check other water filter system, but I can't afford :mad:
And I don't want to buy Mr. Clean stuff. If Meguiar's make one, I buy 3! :D

CAShine
Jan 30th, 2008, 07:45 PM
I voted for the water filtration piece but after reading other peoples post I am leaning more towards the car wash because it no extra step in the process.:idea: Water spots are a definite frustration that always seems to creep up one way or another.

hacker-pschorr
Mar 15th, 2008, 06:15 AM
I would prefer a filter system for one simple reason:

While a soap would definatly help prevent water spotting, what happens when you go to rinse down the car?

I would rather have a system that gets rid of the hard water all together (especially down here in San Diego!). That way, I could use whatever car wash soap I wanted and not be stuck with just using one type of soap.
:iagree:

I would like to see something that is inline with the hose, say back at the spigot versus a hand held unit like the Mr.Clean device.

BINGO53
Mar 19th, 2008, 06:45 PM
I'd really like to see a filter that would attach between nozzle and hose. I currently have a filter for the house just ahead of the outdoor faucet. However because of the city doing an endless "upgrade" on city mains, (18 mos and still digging and ripping the streets) I still have a bit of gook in the water as it goes into the bucket. I realize that NXT wash should be the better product for hard or contaminated water, but for some reason I get much better results with DC, or GC. I did just recently discover #62. WOW! My new go to car wash.

I just think that a small filter for the hose end would be a very marketable item.

seth1066
Sep 15th, 2008, 12:34 PM
I don't see how an engineered car wash could work, the spots are in the rinse water.

miahjohn
Sep 16th, 2008, 09:13 PM
keep it simple meguiars....just some soap will do!

02whitetundra
Sep 23rd, 2008, 01:05 PM
Don't know if it's been mentioned yet but I would like Megs to come up with a rinseless wash to compete with ONR.

Troy83
Nov 22nd, 2008, 09:48 PM
I voted some type of filter. Screw on between spigot and hose would be great. A soap is just during the wash really, what about the rinse?? It'd make more sense, to me, if the water was treated.

Gonzster
Jan 9th, 2009, 09:33 PM
Personally I'd spring for the filter. Here's why...

When washing a car I am often having to go back to certain areas to spend time on, or I will have to go back and wet a car while claying, or before I dry the surface I will spend time washing my wheels and tires.

The problem in that case would be if it was a hot day out and/or if I was claying the car, I have to occasionally walk around the car and spritz it with water to keep it from drying and leaving waterspots.

With just a soap spritzing to keep it wet while you're working on different areas or while claying wouldn't terribly effective.

My 2 cents.

Carfire
Jan 9th, 2009, 09:36 PM
As many others have said before, any of the above would be fine.

xantonin
May 13th, 2009, 03:26 PM
Assuming it isn't expensive, I'd be interested in a water softener type attachment because I don't understand how a car wash can effectively prevent water spots if you're rinsing your car.

If it does prevent water spots it must then leave some sort of "film" behind and I wouldn't like that for my cleaning process. I would not purchase such a product at all, but I would buy a water filter attachment.

I wouldn't be interested in a combination system either because that takes away my freedom to choose a car wash, and I like that option.

xantonin
May 13th, 2009, 03:43 PM
I'd also like to add that such a filter system should be connected to the FAUCET end before connecting the hose, if invented.

This adds the flexibility for your customers to choose their own hose nozzle, or have none at all. Remember if they're rinsing some customers will try to "sheet" the water off with a steady flow of water from the hose, so by having the filter on the faucet end of the hose, allows you to continue doing this.

Eddie6th
Jun 12th, 2009, 06:18 PM
This is from 2004?

Should this poll not be updated/discontinued? There already are hose attatchments out there.

10degreesbtdc
Jun 14th, 2009, 12:27 PM
Since using no-rinse to wash I don't find spotting to be a problem, even in extreme heat since one panel at a time is washed and dried. Same after claying. If you're going to polish, do water spots really matter? On my light color paint I didn't find it a problem before using no-rinse. I always either spray wax, paste or liquid wax or polish, then wax anyway and if there are any spots they come right off. Must be the M21!

I certainly don't want to have to buy an attachment and replace filters/chemicals. I have a Mr. Clean and never bought new cartridges for it. The handle is cracked too from dropping it on the driveway. Personally I think it's junk. Didn't really notice a big difference in preventing spotting either.

I voted for spot resistant soap. Any progress on this technology?

irf@n
Aug 14th, 2009, 04:28 AM
A filler heavy polish or glaze maybe...

JohanD
Sep 9th, 2009, 10:41 PM
Hose attachment. :)

BlackShine
Sep 17th, 2009, 11:55 PM
Definitely any of the 3!

After seeing some other threads about the crspotless to prvent hard water, it looks like it works good but seems a bit overpriced to me. I would think Meguiars could come out with something just as effective as the crspotless system but far less costly for the average car enthusiast that enjoyes washing their own cars and for the detailers.

I see this thread was started in 2004 is there any update on this yet?

You can do it Meguiars I have faith in your products, do it, do the spotless rinse system!

FRS
Jun 24th, 2010, 04:41 AM
I don't quite understand what do you mean by hard water spotting .. I believe we don't have this problem in Australia as water is everything but not hard .. very soft indeed.

jfelbab
Jun 24th, 2010, 04:51 AM
To add a couple of items.

1. Some better hand applicator pads. Something with some thickness/firmness that would transfer some of the pressure from your finger tips to the base of the hand. You can find these at some other vendors but Meguiar's is my vendor of choice so...

2. Waterless washes are becoming a bigger need as many communities are getting green. This is a trend that will continue to ramp up and I'm sure Meg's chemists can provide a superior product.

3. Bring back the brushes. They were a favorite of mine and I'm running down to my last few.

4. Bring back the sunshade. I have two left and I get questioned regularly about where I got them. They display the Meguiar's logo and are good advertising as well as being needed in the summer and the southern states.

4.

Matt Majeika
Jun 24th, 2010, 06:50 AM
Drying the car after washing it prevents the spots for me, but it wouldn't hurt to have some added protection, especially in areas where using well water is a must.

Bill Davidson
Aug 15th, 2010, 10:22 PM
You guys might throw shoes at me for saying this, but...

I'd like to see the consumer product line narrowed down. NXT, Gold Class, Ultimate and then the Deep Crystal products. There seems to be quite a bit of overlap, which ultimately leads to confusion.

Retailers may become more inclined to stock the entire product line, if it was narrower.

Out with the old and in with the new. My guess is that this will eventually happen.

seth1066
Aug 16th, 2010, 05:54 AM
I don't quite understand what do you mean by hard water spotting .. I believe we don't have this problem in Australia as water is everything but not hard .. very soft indeed.No wonder you guys are famous for slamming the coldies back... no hard liquor.

In any event, everything you need to know about hard and soft water:


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hard_water

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_softening

Of particular note to the OP:

Hard water in Australia

Analysis of water hardness in major Australian cities by the Australian Water Association shows a range from very soft (Melbourne) to very hard (Adelaide).

Total Hardness levels of Calcium Carbonate in ppm are: Canberra: 40; Melbourne: 10 - 26; Sydney: 39.4 – 60.1; Perth: 29 – 226; Brisbane: 100; Adelaide: 134 – 148; Hobart: 5.8 – 34.4; Darwin: 31.

hacker-pschorr
Aug 17th, 2010, 07:31 PM
How about for 2011 "we" change the forum settings so threads are not bumped to the top when someone votes in a poll. :)

germany
Dec 8th, 2016, 02:27 AM
I voted for the last one. It would be nice to have the choice of either.