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View Full Version : Are you concerned about hard water spots when washing and drying your vehicle?



Mike Phillips
Dec 1st, 2004, 03:03 PM
We would appreciate your feedback, comments and suggestions on the topic or washing your car.

Thank you for participating in our poll! :xyxthumbs


Question 1

Are you concerned about hard water spots on your paint when washing and drying your vehicle?

RamAirV1
Dec 1st, 2004, 04:42 PM
Hard water spots are one of the most difficult things to remove from paint. It is best to avoid them, rather than remove them.

I also go out of my way to avoid sprinkers that recklessly spray water into the street and onto cars. This is one thing that really makes me mad!

RamAirV1

Rick
Dec 1st, 2004, 05:09 PM
RamAirV1,

I totally agree with ya. I even threw my car in to a full panic skid once and stopped traffic to prevent having to drive under water spraying on to the road from a broken sprinkler head once. Of course our Phoenix water is some of the harder water around too.

Unreal
Dec 1st, 2004, 05:23 PM
Yes I am.

I battle this constantly and have found that the NXT wash does help out alot in this.:wall: :wall: :wall: :wall: :wall:

Rockpick
Dec 1st, 2004, 05:44 PM
Our water here is pretty hard and contains copius amounts of calcium. It's an UPHILL battle to stay ahead of the game with a black vehicle.

I've explored filtration/softening systems. They're just so pricey...

RP :D

RamAirV1
Dec 1st, 2004, 07:00 PM
I just had the faucet in the garage hooked up to the house water softener. It makes a big difference.

RamAirV1

Aurora40
Dec 2nd, 2004, 05:43 AM
I'm concerned in the sense that I don't want hard water spots on my car. But I don't struggle with it. I think maybe it's technique combined with pretty decent water.

If you are asking because Meg's is considering a de-ionized rinse, can I suggest a couple things that would be key to me?

One is for the filter to have decent capacity (would be nice to be able to use it for a whole wash if I wanted, not just final rinsing, and if used for just final rinsing, you shouldn't have to totally chintz out and make just one "optimum" pass in order to have enough filtering to rinse 2-3 cars. I should be able to rinse generously, overlapping on parts, maybe rinsing twice, etc, and still do 5 or more cars, IMO.

The other is to include some kind of nozzle. I've toyed with the notion of a DI filter for a while now, and probably the one biggest factor is that I feel it will have very low water flow, and that with my Ultimate Nozzle, or most hose nozzles, it will just piddle out the end and not actually spray very well.

A bypass on the filter, and perhaps a nozzle with two modes, big flow unfiltered, and small flow filtered spray, would also be nice, though I'd probably just use the Ultimate Nozzle and then screw on whichever filtered nozzle it had, as the Ultimate Nozzle is pretty ultimate... ;)

AZScooter
Dec 3rd, 2004, 05:00 AM
I wash cars commercially and we use DI water all of the time. It does not have to be ridiculously expensive and you can use a set up in the garage. You just need to find a supplier for it. Culligan and Ionics are both decent suppliers for DI water systems. You just have to negotiate a low volume price from them, and you will be good to go.

AzScooter

damonswank
Dec 7th, 2004, 12:53 PM
This is an easy problem to solve -- but not particularly cheap.

Rayne Water Company (and others, I am sure) will provide a tank just like your water softener. It will turn about 1,000 gallons of water into deinonized (this is ditstilled water, not "soft" water."

It is about $35 a month. Every once in a while you replace the canister at a cost of perhaps $40.

Note that you do not use this water to wash your car. You use it to rinse the car. Distilled water (no minerals) has many other uses around the house: steam irons, windows, etc.

Damon Swank

AZScooter
Dec 7th, 2004, 03:07 PM
Deionized and distilled water are totally different.
There are three types of ultra pure water. I hope to explain the difference so that it is clear.
DI or Deionized water is passed through a resin bed to neutralize the electrical charge of any ions or metals that it contains. When this happens water cannot conduct electricity. In order to do this there are tow types of resin beds that can be used. teh first is what is called a CA bed. You have two tanks and one removes or neutralizes the cations and the other removes the anions. The other is mixed bed, and actually has the cation and anion resins mixed together. The final product is water that has lost it's ability to conduct electricity because of the neutralized metal elements in the water. Think of a magnet that has been demagnetized. This is usually the choice of mobile detailers because the size of the tanks lend themselves to portability and let you process water on site. INteresting trivia, the Intel plant in Chandler, Arizona purifies the water they use after the manufacturing process in a huge DI plant, and then injects back into the underground aquifer. This was one of the conditions of them being able to build the plant.

RO water is microfiltered, usually through a ceramic filter. This totally removes the metal particles or bad things that cause water hardness by filtration. It also removes chemicals that might be in the water that you drink, such as Chlorine, etc. This method can be a little cheaper than DI water because of the filtration process, although both of them run 5 to 10 cents a gallon to process the water. Of course this all depends on the are that you live in. If you are in a hard water area, such as the desert southwest, or Alaska or somewhere else where the city id very dependent on under ground aquifers for drinking water it will be more expensive. If they depend on lakes and rivers for drinking water then it is a little less expensive. For a professional detailer, all of the water would have to be processed at their home or office and transported via tank.

Disitlled water is actually done through a distillation process. That means the water is actually boiled and the steam is recaptured and chilled to make it water. This leaves all of the metal particles behind in the hot tank and ideally leaves pure water behind. This is probably the most ponderous method to purify water. It is also probably the least pure method of the three, and the most ponderous for our uses.

Now to give you an idea of the levels of purity...
In the manufacturing process for electronics, they use DI water. It is the most pure and thus the most useful, because tehre is no chance of residues being left behind.
For Soda pop and such, it is typically RO water. This will remove any impurities that might change the taste of what you are thinking.
Distilled is the oldest technology, and also the slowest. I cannot think right off hand of any industrial uses of distliied water, although I know that my mom used to use distilled water in her iron in the '60's to make it last longer, because the RO technonllgy and DI technology were not fully developped.

And there I go, I probably made it as clear as mud. This is something that I have been dealing with on a daily basis for nearly twenty years now.

Mike Phillips
Dec 7th, 2004, 03:17 PM
Originally posted by AZScooter
Deionized and distilled water are totally different.
There are three types of ultra pure water. I hope to explain the difference so that it is clear.

And there I go, I probably made it as clear as mud. This is something that I have been dealing with on a daily basis for nearly twenty years now.

Wow!

Thanks for the education on the different types of water AZScooter. I know I for one am thankful to you for sharing your wealth of knowledge.

:bow

Mike

damonswank
Dec 7th, 2004, 04:20 PM
Your explanation of water treatment techniques is absolutely fascinating.

Is the DI treatment that Rayne (for example) uses really the best trreatment available? Is it the one we should use?

My take on your exposition is that the DI treatment is the best. It results in the most pure water than we can achieve. You say that industry uses it for the most exacting applications.

The bottom line: if we want really clean water, we use the DI service, as I suggested?

Thanks very much.

Damon Swank

AZScooter
Dec 7th, 2004, 07:25 PM
You need to be careful with Rayne. I don't know about LA, but in Mesa they offer water softening tanks that are similar, but not the same as DI water. What they offer is not much better than a salt exchange water softener.
If it is DI then it should be good.

There are a couple of things to be concerned about with DI water. It is VERY corrosive. It will not have an effect on your car, and its finish, but it will eat up soft metals, such as the brass in a pressure washer pump, over time. Pure water is acidic. So think of it as running a very mild acid through something metal for an extended period of time. That happens with DI water is that the minerals that help tap water have a neutral pH are deactivated, or removed, for all intents and purposes.

Now for washing cars, if you are a mobile detailer, DI is the way to go for 99% of them. There are always a few that prefer RO but on the whole, DI is better.

If you have a shop, I would go with RO, mainly because it has a large up front cost to set it up, but you own the equipment, and you will not need monthly service.

AZScooter

Aurora40
Dec 8th, 2004, 04:21 AM
Originally posted by AZScooter
Disitlled water is actually done through a distillation process. That means the water is actually boiled and the steam is recaptured and chilled to make it water. This leaves all of the metal particles behind in the hot tank and ideally leaves pure water behind. This is probably the most ponderous method to purify water. It is also probably the least pure method of the three, and the most ponderous for our uses.

Why would distilled water be the least pure method? Distillation removes absolutely everything from water, not just those things that make it conductive. It is a very simple, yet expensive and slow process, which is likely why there is very little industrial use for it.

Aurora40
Dec 8th, 2004, 04:27 AM
Originally posted by AZScooter
Pure water is acidic.

I don't mean to sound like a jerk, but this is utterly and absolutely false. In fact, it's false by the very definition of pH.

DI water tends to be non-neutral because the filters tend to only remove one type of ion from the water, leaving it unbalanced. I don't know that much about DI filters to go into detail, but basically if you pulled out all the cations and left all the anions or vice-versa, you'd be left with water with a non-neutral pH. I think most larger scale DI systems have some post-processing of the water to balance out the pH.

Distilled water will be pH neutral without any need for adding or buffering it.

AZScooter
Dec 8th, 2004, 06:11 AM
The actual chemical composition of water is HOH. All acids have H or Hydrogen as one of the components. This is the composition of Acids. Remember that I said a VERY mild acid. I have spent Thousands of dollars replacing metal parts on pressure washers that have become useless due to hydrogen embrittlement. This is caused by the loose hydrogen particle searching for some metal to attach itself to, and gradually eating up the metal that comes in contact with it.

As for distilled water being the purest form of water, again you are mistaken.
Remember the old Andy Griffith movies where they would go bust up the still, or distiller? Remember the liquid that would come dripping out, and they called it moonshine?
The distilling process takes out all of the stuff that has a hard physical property, but if it has a liquid property, it can stay in teh water. That is what gives moonshine, and any other distilled liquor, it's kick.

AZScooter
Dec 8th, 2004, 06:17 AM
As for the DI water only pulling the anions or cations out, my system,a nd most of the systems that I have seen pull both cation and anion particles out. Some of them do it oone type of particle at a time, usually Cation first, then anion, and then some are mixed bed systems, where they two resins in the tank work together to pull out the particles.

Interestingly, if you ever go into a regeneration facility to see how the resins are processed for reuse, it is interesting, because one type of particle is more of a base, and acid is used to clean the resins, and the other is more of an acid, so NaOH or sodium hydroxide is used to clean the resin.

If you want to go to this link, you will see that water for the most part is mildly acidic
http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/phdiagram.html

Aurora40
Dec 8th, 2004, 07:03 AM
Originally posted by AZScooter
The actual chemical composition of water is HOH. All acids have H or Hydrogen as one of the components. This is the composition of Acids. Remember that I said a VERY mild acid. I have spent Thousands of dollars replacing metal parts on pressure washers that have become useless due to hydrogen embrittlement. This is caused by the loose hydrogen particle searching for some metal to attach itself to, and gradually eating up the metal that comes in contact with it.

As for distilled water being the purest form of water, again you are mistaken.
Remember the old Andy Griffith movies where they would go bust up the still, or distiller? Remember the liquid that would come dripping out, and they called it moonshine?
The distilling process takes out all of the stuff that has a hard physical property, but if it has a liquid property, it can stay in teh water. That is what gives moonshine, and any other distilled liquor, it's kick.

I don't want to get in a big debate about it. But yes, acids are extra H+ ions in the water, as bases are extra OH- ones. However, in pure water, there would be a pair of each of these, and it would have a neutral pH. That link shows that streams and rain tend to be acidic. That's not pure water. I certainly never said water can't be acidic or basic, the pH scale in fact only applies to water. Here is a link that is a bit more informative: http://web.jjay.cuny.edu/~acarpi/NSC/7-ph.htm

As for the Andy Griffiths reference, they were busting up water distilleries? :confused: What kinds of liquids are you saying there are in water? And everything has a liquid state. What it would really need is to have a boiling point at or less than that of water so it would evaporate and then get condendsed along with the water. What things in water do this?

AZScooter
Dec 8th, 2004, 09:10 AM
No, they were distilling liquor, but in order to get the liquor they were using water as a medium, just like all liquors do.

I will still stand by my thing that water is mildly acidic, and that DI water is also mildly acidic. I guess theoretically, perfect water is pH neutral, but I have never seen it, and it has a tendency to be more acidic than basic.

keanucosmo
Dec 9th, 2004, 07:23 AM
Back on topic, I've never had a problem with water spots from washing my car. After washing and rinsing, I use a silicone blade to squegee most of the water off the car and finish with a towel.

electricgreen
Jan 3rd, 2005, 09:27 AM
In short, yes. I HATE water spots.

rusty bumper
May 1st, 2005, 09:28 PM
Thank goodness we live around soft water. :D

I've studied water quality a little due to my aquarium hobby.

I think I remember reading that (Absolutely) pure water would kill you if you drank it.......Something about it corroding the iron in your body.

Interesting thread, BTW.

SchwarzenSchafe
Jul 8th, 2005, 07:23 AM
When researching drinking distilled water I've read over and over how standing distilled water will absorb carbon dioxide (I think?) from the air and turn acidic in a short time, and this is why it should be capped and put in the fridge.

Drinking pure water causing corrosion of iron in your body is so ridiculous I can't believe you would even bring it up. THere's a debate over whether it removes needed minerals from the body or simply removes EXCESS minerals from the body. THat's another advantage of washing with pure water, it'll actually wash away MORE contamination than tapwater will, as well as not leaving anything behind. It's similar to using a dirty cloth to clean your car VS a clean cloth, the clean one picks up more dirt. I'm not talking about dirt though, but smaller particles, minerals, chemicals, etc.

rusty bumper
Jul 8th, 2005, 06:25 PM
Originally posted by SchwarzenSchafe
Drinking pure water causing corrosion of iron in your body is so ridiculous I can't believe you would even bring it up.
If I remember correctly, that report was made by a noted marine biologist.......I will try to look for the info......I'm sure it's around here somewhere.

SchwarzenSchafe
Jul 8th, 2005, 08:33 PM
I'd definately be interested in reading that. I've found there's a lot of misinformation about drinking distilled water and virtually no studies are ever done on it.

Mike Phillips
Jul 13th, 2005, 01:05 PM
Originally posted by SchwarzenSchafe
Drinking pure water causing corrosion of iron in your body is so ridiculous I can't believe you would even bring it up.

Let's try to be a little nicer to our fellow forum members, he may be wrong and he may be right, but he's definitely not out to misinform anyone.

Tim Lingor
Jul 13th, 2005, 01:40 PM
Originally posted by Mike Phillips
Let's try to be a little nicer to our fellow forum members, he may be wrong and he may be right, but he's definitely not out to misinform anyone.

I could not agree more with Mike's statement. Opinions are just that, opinions. RB was expressing his opinion on what he read/heard. It is not appropriate to say that his comment is ridiculous. You may disagree, but that can be done in a tasteful and respectful manner.

MOL is known for its friendly, and helpful tone. And, it will be kept that way! :xyxthumbs

Tim

rusty bumper
Jul 18th, 2005, 04:20 PM
Just a follow-up here.......

I haven't had much time to search for the article, but I wasn't exactly referring to ordinary distilled water here.

I will post the article when I locate it.

Kevin Brown
Sep 29th, 2005, 11:23 AM
WAY BACK...
I also looked in to this corrosive, acidic 'reading' of DI water. My water guy (who has owned his water service company for around thirty years) said that in order to get a pH 7.0 reading from purified water, it must be tested BEFORE ambient air is introduced. He said that the carbon in the air mixes with the water and causes the pH to immediately shift.

To get the actual pH 7.0 reading, one must have the pH sensor in the water line immediately after processing has occurred. :wall:

barrman
Dec 5th, 2005, 07:25 AM
hard water spots... or water spots period are the things i fight with the most.

i was considering buying a mr. clean autodry JUST for the filtered spot-free rinse.

jonezzz
Dec 28th, 2005, 05:53 PM
my number 1 enemy...........:iagree:

Slick
Jan 10th, 2006, 05:03 AM
Originally posted by jonezzz
my number 1 enemy...........:iagree:

... mine too. Especially living in the high desert (I'm sure Mike Phillips can relate) with HARD water and very low humidity. I have a BIG problem getting the car dried off fast enough. It just evaporates off SO quickly & spots like crazy (and that's in complete shade). I've checked into the Rayne water conditioning system, but for the time being, my procedure is to use the Mr. Clean Autodry to final rinse the cars. Then I use a California water blade to squegee as much water off as possible. Then I go over the entire vehicle to get any spots & the rest of the water drops. This is probably why it takes me 2-3 hours (each) to wash the vehicles.

del_badboy
Mar 5th, 2006, 05:34 AM
I own and operate a mobile bussines and water spots are a big issue especially when your out in the sun all day.especially when the water dries on the windows. i found that a good car wash soap is the key and ive also added a water filter on my tanks in every truck.

Scottwax
Mar 17th, 2006, 09:08 AM
Absolutely. Black cars in the summer are tough to get competely dry before they dry on their own.

RWayne
Mar 17th, 2006, 06:44 PM
:iagree:
Water Spots are a major concern for me. I got quite a few on my car right now and I am hoping I can get them off with scratch X or something. Waiting for the weather to get above 65 degrees here in Virginia

I really encourage Megs to make a water filtration hose attachment that could reduce the occurrences of water spots.

iroc2fm
Apr 13th, 2006, 09:19 PM
Water spots were such an issue with me that I actually bought a Ionics Water machine. The one that most dealerships in Southern California use.

It's not the cheapest, but I can wash my cars and not have to worry about drying them.

F-150
Apr 16th, 2006, 05:17 PM
Originally posted by iroc2fm
Water spots were such an issue with me that I actually bought a Ionics Water machine. The one that most dealerships in Southern California use.

It's not the cheapest, but I can wash my cars and not have to worry about drying them.

You should do a review on that. Details on how it works, is it worth it, where'd you get it, good quality?, and what kind is it?

F-150
May 3rd, 2006, 11:18 AM
Originally posted by RamAirV1
Hard water spots are one of the most difficult things to remove from paint. It is best to avoid them, rather than remove them.

I also go out of my way to avoid sprinkers that recklessly spray water into the street and onto cars. This is one thing that really makes me mad!

RamAirV1

It's even worse if you just got done detailing your car and have to go to work and stop at a light and on your right is a golf course and a sprinkler is headed your way, and you can't avoid it cuz people are behind you and to the left and you can only make a right turn but still get hit with the water. So you just sitting there hoping it'll turn green when, the water sprays all over your windshield and hood and the rest of the right side of your truck. And you can't go back home quickly cuz you gotta go to work. Yeah when I got off work, my windshield, hood, roof, and whole right side of the truck had water spots. But a quick wash when I got home got rid of them.

Cadude
Jun 29th, 2006, 06:16 AM
This thread is fascinating reading. I found it through a search I did to learn more about water conditioning.

I don't really have a problem with water spots but I was wondering what impact impurities in water have on waxes and sealants. I would think high PH levels would be more likely to reduce the life of waxes and sealants. How about chlorine and other items added to municipal water systems?

xebola
Jul 3rd, 2006, 07:33 AM
I live in a condominium that has a small car wash area behind the physical plant. The water is extremely hard, and non-potable.

Here is what I have been doing:

I clean and rain-x all the glass before I start washing. Based on my experience and stuff that I have read here, I believe that the glass on newer Toyotas is unusually susceptible to water spots. This step has made a huge difference.

After washing the car, and using the soak method to remove most of the water, I rinse the whole car with a 2-gallon pump sprayer that contains a gallon of distilled water ($1.50 - $2.00.)

I then dry the car using a combination of towels, and an 18volt leaf blower (without the extension tubes.)

I leave the pump sprayer charged and ready to go in a shaded area. On really hot days I add a tray of ice cubes made from distilled water to the pump sprayer. By the time I am ready to use it the ice has melted but the water is still slightly cool.

I also like to use this as a rinse after claying.

I have been pleased with the results and I figure at $1.50 - $2.00 per car it is still cheaper than anything else I can think of.

Any thoughts/criticisms about this method are more than welcome.

Regards

rascal
Aug 12th, 2006, 09:38 AM
Nope...water here is pretty soft. I keep the cars I detail out of the sun before I wash and while polish and wax. Makes the job go so much easier.

CathyG
Aug 19th, 2006, 07:23 PM
Water spots are what got me to do some research about detailing. As other people have said the water in AZ *****. I wet, wash, and rinse one panel at a time because if I hose the whole car down by the time I`m done I have spots everywhere. It doesn`t help that my car is black and can`t be put in the garage.

RamAirV1
Aug 19th, 2006, 08:13 PM
Originally posted by CathyG
Water spots are what got me to do some research about detailing. As other people have said the water in AZ *****. I wet, wash, and rinse one panel at a time because if I hose the whole car down by the time I`m done I have spots everywhere. It doesn`t help that my car is black and can`t be put in the garage.

Ahhh, so I'm not the only one who does that! It takes longer to do a car wash that way, but it really helps cut down on the water spots. So total time is saved because it can take a lonnnnng time to remove hard water spots.

RamAirV1

hammer55
Sep 20th, 2006, 12:38 PM
I HAVE A BLACK CAR ALSO, I TRY TO KEEP IT WET TILL I AM READY TO DRY, THEN TOWEL DRY AND THEN HAVE A TOWEL IN MY HAND AND USE A LEAF BLOWER TO BLOW ALL THE NOOKS AND CRANNYS OUT AND TOWEL AS I GO, HELPS

Lydia
Sep 20th, 2006, 12:55 PM
Hard water spots are a major problem for me. In fact, I know when the sprinklers come on on the road I come home from work on, and if it's past 10 o'clock when I get off work, I drive on the other side of the road to avoid the water (obviously only when there isn't a car on the other side, lol).

I should just use the faucet that is hooked up to the water softener when I wash my truck, but I usually forget to.


Thank goodness we live around soft water. :D

I've studied water quality a little due to my aquarium hobby.

I think I remember reading that (Absolutely) pure water would kill you if you drank it.......Something about it corroding the iron in your body.

Interesting thread, BTW.

Totally off topic here, but what kind of tank do you have? I, too, have an "aquarium hobby".

JRauCDM
Nov 25th, 2006, 06:52 AM
I don't have too much trouble here where I live. Our water is softened, so I have no trouble with hard water issues.

JRau in central Iowa

rusty bumper
Nov 25th, 2006, 07:51 AM
Totally off topic here, but what kind of tank do you have? I, too, have an "aquarium hobby".

I have two freshwater tanks (10g and 30g)

So sorry I responded so late!

I must have missed an e-mailer or something.:o

PhantomR/T
Nov 28th, 2006, 01:40 PM
ugh. I hate water spots! And this is an old thread :LOLOL:

gorin002
Jan 8th, 2007, 09:19 AM
i drank some water do water gotta be good huh:)

sixty7mustang22
Feb 2nd, 2007, 11:31 AM
They are a concern for me, but they aren't a problem. We have hard water around here, but I always dry my vehicle right after I was and I us a QD to get whatever has already dried if it is a really hot. So, I never really have a problem with them.

DysA32
Feb 3rd, 2007, 01:50 AM
i hate water spots. i think it takes away from the look of the car

hondaprelude98
Feb 4th, 2007, 09:37 AM
yea that is true because i use it and it does help

cv_soccer
Apr 12th, 2007, 05:54 AM
I keep my car wet until it is time to dry it off then after doing that I wipe it down with NXT Quick Detail spray or NXT Spray Wax. My only problem is rain and my car parked outside.

hacker-pschorr
Mar 15th, 2008, 04:30 AM
It's the only reason why I installed a water softner.

WhiteLX
Oct 23rd, 2008, 08:57 PM
I voted no because I don't live in an area with hard water so it doesn't bother me when washing or drying.

However, I do fear the sprinklers anywhere I go. ;)

EPHIOS
Nov 12th, 2008, 08:19 PM
I am concern about hard water spots on my car. So, after washing my car and dried, I usually grab my Final Inspection or Last Touch to get rid of water spots.

jatee
Nov 12th, 2008, 08:45 PM
brilliant black pearl paint on the wagon and i absolutly cant stand water spots on her.

rsylvstr
Nov 15th, 2008, 11:49 AM
not at all....we have a whole house reverse osmosis water purification system!

To be named later
Mar 7th, 2009, 07:21 PM
Absolutely.

San Antonio water is high in mineral deposits. (H2O comes from a limestone aquifer) Our RX8 has several "drip zones" inherent in the design....the exterior rearview mirrors, the rear glass, and a molded part at the top of the doors where they meet the quarter panel, all are notorious among RX8 owners for hiding water that can't be dried with a chamois.

If you park it after washing, invariably you will get dried H2O lines.....if you take it for a spin you get splatters.

Given that the RX8 is black, it can be a major pain.

supercharged
Mar 21st, 2009, 08:04 PM
installing a water softener doesn't help much...I'm thinking about CR Spotless for final rinse only...it's kinda pricey...

Eddie6th
Jun 3rd, 2009, 04:36 PM
At my old house,the water was soft,and this wasn't a problem.I did have access to reverse osmosis,but never used it for washing the car.The water i have now is full of calcium and leaves deposits.I believe there is a filter that can be attached to your hose,but they are expensive,and the harder the water,the quicker they will become exhausted.

rusty bumper
Jun 3rd, 2009, 07:38 PM
Our water has very little buffering in it.

Some of the softest water I've ever seen.:xyxthumbs

dope92cc
Jul 24th, 2009, 11:27 PM
I can't say I'm not concerned.
I usually don't expect any unless the mirrors like to hold gallons of water, like my mom's car.
My 3 water magnets did a great job on completely drying the paint on my brothers ext cab Silverado and my big ol Caprice car.

CieraSL
Mar 28th, 2010, 12:15 PM
Hard water spots are a problem, but not one I've really had to deal with. I voted no in the poll.

rusty bumper
Apr 4th, 2010, 08:41 PM
Here's a hardwater map I found...

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/500/Hard_water_map.jpg

I'm sure this is a map of surface water because *any* well water would be full of minerals I presume.

Looks like the biggest part of America has very hard surface water. I didn't know that.

ca2kjet
Sep 13th, 2010, 03:13 PM
That map is depressing... :sosad1 guess I'm lucky to be in an area of slightly hard water then

BillE
Sep 19th, 2010, 04:52 AM
After spending 40+ years in the Pacific Northwest, hard water was NEVER a concern. Just left over water spots that would come off with a damp MF. I never understood the problem with hard water UNTIL I moved to Minnesota! Right in the middle of a "Red Zone!"

The only words I have about this are only four (4) letters long.

Bill

EPHIOS
Oct 26th, 2010, 12:44 PM
YES, I am. They are a pain to remove when they dry-out.

ironbark
Jun 16th, 2011, 05:55 PM
I have a 5000 litre rain water tank with a pump connected. I only wash the car in rain water.