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Michael Stoops
Dec 11th, 2009, 01:59 PM
Here’s a question that confuses a lot of people when working with various liquid products – Which products should be allowed to dry before removing? This is a question we get almost daily in our Customer Care Center and it’s a topic we discuss, and repeat, during our Saturday Detailing 101 Classes. The answer is really quite simple, but the reasons behind the answer can be a bit more complex. Let’s look at the answer first.


All Meguiar's polishes, paint cleaners, cleaner/polishes and compounds should be wiped off while still wet.
All Meguiar’s waxes and sealants should always be allowed to dry fully before removal.

Done.
But why all the confusion?


Polishes, Paint Cleaners, Cleaner/Polishes & Compounds - wipe off while still wet

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1348/cleaners.jpg

Products like paint cleaners (Ultimate Compound, ScratchX 2.0, etc), polishes (M07 Show Car Glaze, M05 New Car Glaze, Deep Crystal Polish, etc), cleaner/polishes (SwirlX, M80 Speed Glaze, M205 Ultra Finishing Polish, etc) and compounds (M105 Ultra Cut Compound, M85 Diamond Cut Compound, etc) only do their job when being worked against the paint.

In the case of a pure polish when you work them against the paint you’re pushing the rich polishing oils into the pores of the paint, nourishing it, enhancing the gloss and deepening the color. Simply wiping them on and letting them sit assumes that the product somehow does something on it’s own, that perhaps some reaction is taking place deep within the chemistry of the product. But it isn’t. Pure polishes need your help in order to get worked onto and into the paint.

The same holds true with paint cleaners and compounds, but to an even greater extent. These products are designed to physically remove defects below the surface of the paint, typically fine swirls, scratches or even sanding marks in the case of a compound. That process literally involves physically working an abrasive particle against the paint in order to level the paint and remove the defect. Scary as it may sound, the process isn’t terribly different from the act of sanding a piece of wood! Imagine what would happen if you set a sheet of sandpaper on a piece of wood and then let it sit for 10 minutes. If you’re expecting the sandpaper to reshape that piece of wood on its own, you’re in for a bit of a surprise. And the same holds true for paint cleaners, cleaner/polishes and compounds. They require a physical action in order to do their job, and that physical action is you working the product against the paint, either vigorously by hand or with a power tool of some sort, such as Meguiar’s G110v2 dual action polisher.

OK, fine, but that doesn’t answer why you don’t want to let these products dry. Or does it? Simply put, since these products only do their job while being physically worked against the paint, there is nothing to gain from letting them dry. In fact, by nature of their composition, some of these products can become quite difficult to remove if you do let them dry. So don’t do it!


Waxes & Sealants, including cleaner waxes - allow to dry completely

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1348/waxes2.jpg
Waxes and sealants, including those that contain some cleaning ability such as D151 Paint Reconditioning Cream, ColorX or Cleaner Wax, should be allowed to fully dry before removal because they need time to cure and bond to the paint. In the case of these products there actually is something going on in the chemistry that requires them to dry. If you wipe them off while still wet they don’t have a chance for that chemistry to do its thing and let them bond, so you end up compromising their performance. There is a difference in application process depending on whether you're using a wax with cleaners in it or one without. From we have previously discussed about how the cleaners in other products work, we can see why a cleaner wax needs to be physically worked against the surface first - so the fine abrasives can remove minor defects. In this case you start out using the product much like a paint cleaner, but because it's also a wax, you need to let it dry. A wax without cleaning ability, such as NXT Generation Tech Wax 2.0, M26 High Tech Yellow Wax, Deep Crystal Carnauba and others, only needs to be lightly worked onto the surface so as to leave a very thin film behind, and then be allowed to fully dry. Vigorously working these products against the paint serves no real purpose as they lack even fine cleaning abrasives.

So how do you know if a wax or sealant is dry enough to remove? As a general rule of thumb you should allow 15 to 20 minutes of drying time and then perform the “Swipe Test”. This is a simple test that involves quickly and firmly swiping your clean fingertip against the paint, removing a small area of freshly applied wax. If the swiped area reveals paint that is clear and glossy then the wax is dry and you can wipe off any hazed residue. If the swiped area is streaked or smeared, however, that is an indication that the wax is not fully dry and more time should be allowed for it to do so.

These rules hold true whether you're working with our Consumer Line, Detailer Line or Mirror Glaze Line. You can sum it like this: if the product you are applying to the paint is your final step or your only step, and is intended to offer protection to the finish, let it dry.

Mike Phillips
Dec 11th, 2009, 02:35 PM
Great article!

Right before I left Meguiar's I actually took pictures of the physical products themselves for the previous version of this article. Just never got around to resizing them, uploading them and inserting them.

Nice work Mike.

I find when teaching classes there's a lot of confusion and that's where I came up with the idea for this article and then wrote it in the first place.

Nice updated version though.

:bow :bow :bow

speed3blackmica
Dec 11th, 2009, 02:37 PM
well said mike !

felixtibs
Dec 11th, 2009, 04:34 PM
nice article!

It is confusing because it clearly states on my DC polish to "let dry"

thanks for clearing that up!

wewe98
Feb 1st, 2010, 06:13 AM
Nice share.. how about Ultimate Quik Wax? should I let them dry first? I spray the wax first to may MF, and spray as small as possible to my car surface and wipe the with the moist side of my MF. Should I wait before buffing them off??

I use NXT 2.0 also. It is a really great product, what will happen if I let them dry, let say, for 1 hour-just to make sure they are dry enough to buff. So far, I apply as this as possible coat of wax and wait about 30 minutes before buff them off.

Thanks

Michael Stoops
Feb 1st, 2010, 07:52 AM
Nice share.. how about Ultimate Quik Wax? should I let them dry first? I spray the wax first to may MF, and spray as small as possible to my car surface and wipe the with the moist side of my MF. Should I wait before buffing them off??
Spray waxes tend to dry very quickly, but whether you actually wait for UQW to dry or not doesn't make a huge difference. It can generally be sprayed on and basically just wiped off.

I use NXT 2.0 also. It is a really great product, what will happen if I let them dry, let say, for 1 hour-just to make sure they are dry enough to buff. So far, I apply as this as possible coat of wax and wait about 30 minutes before buff them off.
Waiting an hour before wiping off NXT 2.0 is fine. A lot of people will apply the product and then start dealing with the rest of the car - vacuum the interior, dress all the interior and exterior vinyl and rubber, treat the leather, clean the windows inside and out, etc. By the time they've done all that an hour or more has usually gone by; the wax is completely dry and still wipes off very easily.

Alexandre
Feb 2nd, 2010, 10:51 PM
So it is really ok to wax the entire car, let it dry for a hour?

I always thought you had to wait like a minute or so, omg, I have much to learn :nervous1

Murr1525
Feb 2nd, 2010, 11:05 PM
Yes, wax the entire car at once.

It probably only needs to sit 20 minutes or so, but humidity can make it take longer to dry.

Caress Detailing
Feb 3rd, 2010, 02:16 AM
Uh oh... I've been using D151 and not letting it fully dry on the paint... However I haven't had any complaints... But looks like I'm going to change my technique and allow it to dry just in case.

Michael Stoops
Feb 3rd, 2010, 08:41 AM
Uh oh... I've been using D151 and not letting it fully dry on the paint... However I haven't had any complaints... But looks like I'm going to change my technique and allow it to dry just in case.

D151 is a little quirky in that regard as it can easily be removed when still wet on the surface without streaking. In fact, since it was developed specifically for high volume reconditioning facilities this quality was engineered into D151. With those facilities time is money, and they do so many cars in one day (Manheim Auctions in Riverside will do 375 vehicles/day) they can't even wait 5 minutes for a wax to dry.

michaelmast
Mar 3rd, 2010, 02:11 PM
Hi, thank you to show your products, those are differents to anyone that i saw before, but what about the prices, could you give me a page or something. do you have discounts

SouthTexasRancher
Mar 17th, 2010, 01:33 PM
Thanks for the great info, Michael.

I clay bar'd and waxed my truck last week with Gold Class Liquid and on Saturday afternoon I was in Auto Zone and saw Meguiar's #7 Show Car Glaze and purchased a bottle.

My question is:

When can the #7 Showcar Glaze be applied to a vehicle with Gold Class Liquid Wax already on the vehicle. A week, month, longer, etc.???

Zuke
Mar 17th, 2010, 01:56 PM
If I am using the PRC for correction and following up with a finishing pad, need I let it dry 1st? Also, would this act as a second "coat" since its a AIO?

SouthTexasRancher
Mar 17th, 2010, 05:53 PM
A follow up question...

I've never used a product before where you wipe it off before it dries so does this mean you grab your microfiber cloth and wipe the polish off immediately after putting the polish on the vehicle, i.e., within seconds? I've got to retrain this 'old' brain of mine...at least what is left of it. LOL

Thanks in advance for your help...

agp56
Mar 17th, 2010, 07:48 PM
Rancher - after the wax is applied most waxes need to set up a little. Do the SWIPE test - rub a clean dry index finger over a small spot on a panel. If it is smeary it is not ready yet, if it is not smeary - it is OK to buff. The time needed to be ready varies based on the temperature, the humidity, and how thick the coat of wax is.

SouthTexasRancher
Mar 17th, 2010, 09:04 PM
Hi agp56,

I didn't have any problem with the Gold Class Liquid Wax. I just let it dry to a haze like I've done in the past with Liquid Glass and NuFinish. It is the #7 Show Car Glaze polish I am not sure about. Since I just waxed my truck last week with the Gold Class I purchased the #7 this past weekend after the truck already had the wax applied. I had never seen the #7 in Advance, Auto Zone, Pep Boys, O'Rielly, etc. until this weekend. The guy at Auto Zone couldn't answer my questions other than to say they can't keep up with all the Meguiar's products. I can't either...LOL

I was hoping Michael could answer how long the Gold Class stays on ( a couple weeks, 3 weeks, a month, longer???) before I can polish my truck or if I can polish over the Gold Class now and then top the #7 off with a coat of the Gold Class liquid.

And the other question is do you just put the #7 on an area of say 3'x3' +/- and immediately start buffing it off (seems like you'll go through a bunch of microfiber towels) or do you wait a minute, 2 minutes, longer??? I am so used to polishing and waxing with products that dry to a haze and then you just buff it off. I might go back to Auto Zone and exchange the #7 for another kind of polish that I am used to or just get my money back since the truck is white and new. Maybe clay baring and waxing is enough.

On another thread here on Meguiar's I was told that #7 idoes not act as a cleaner/polisher which is contrary to what Michael stated (unless I am reading his post wrong).

Murr1525
Mar 17th, 2010, 09:51 PM
It is the #7 Show Car Glaze polish I am not sure about. Since I just waxed my truck last week with the Gold Class I purchased the #7 this past weekend after the truck already had the wax applied. I was hoping Michael could answer how long the Gold Class stays on ( a couple weeks, 3 weeks, a month, longer???) before I can polish my truck or if I can polish over the Gold Class now and then top the #7 off with a coat of the Gold Class liquid.

Lots of people will polish and wax over their existing wax, just have to be certain the surface is clean. Wax is only a microscopic coating, rubbing an oily product across it with an applicator will certainly stir it up. Its not like the polish will float on top and slide off..... Or you can use a paint cleaner first as well.

So if you want, you can try it anytime. If you want to wait until the wax wears off, could be a while, 3 weeks or 3 months. All depends on your area, if it is garaged, etc.


And the other question is do you just put the #7 on an area of say 3'x3' +/- and immediately start buffing it off (seems like you'll go through a bunch of microfiber towels) or do you wait a minute, 2 minutes, longer??? I am so used to polishing and waxing with products that dry to a haze and then you just buff it off. I might go back to Auto Zone and exchange the #7 for another kind of polish that I am used to or just get my money back since the truck is white and new. Maybe clay baring and waxing is enough.

Well, you would do something like a door, apply the product thin, rub it in just a little. Then wipe off the door. With #7, a good technique is to do a big wipe to get the bulk of the product off, then kind of come back and get the left over.

DC Polish is easy to use, as another option.

If you wanted, another option would be to clay, then either Cleaner/Wax or ColorX, and then wax. This will let you clean and polish the paint, get the recommended two coats of wax, and let you use products that are meant to dry. Will certainly be an improvement over just waxing.


On another thread here on Meguiar's I was told that #7 idoes not act as a cleaner/polisher which is contrary to what Michael stated (unless I am reading his post wrong).

#7 is a pure polish, meaning only polishing oils. As mentioned above, rubbing anything liquid over the paint will have at least a little cleaning effect.

Michael Stoops
Mar 18th, 2010, 01:57 PM
Thanks for the great info, Michael.

I clay bar'd and waxed my truck last week with Gold Class Liquid and on Saturday afternoon I was in Auto Zone and saw Meguiar's #7 Show Car Glaze and purchased a bottle.

My question is:

When can the #7 Showcar Glaze be applied to a vehicle with Gold Class Liquid Wax already on the vehicle. A week, month, longer, etc.??? While you can apply #7 right after applying Gold Class, the best method is to apply a pure polish like #7 first, then apply the wax on top of it. Pure polishes won't stick around very long at all if they are the LSP (last step product - ie, the one on top) so they need a wax to sort of "lock" them down. So the big question is, how long will your application of Gold Class last? Well, that depends on a lot of factors - temp, humidity, rain...exposure in general. Three months with moderate exposure sounds about right, or you could just clay the vehicle quickly to remove the majority of the wax and then apply the #7 following that process, then put on a fresh coat of Gold Class.

And being that #7 is a "Pure Polish" it lacks true cleaning ability so it alone won't remove your earlier Gold Class application. True, if you work it vigorously enough then the applicator itself will likely pull some wax from the surface, but the #7 won't.

And if you're struggling to wrap your head around the whole "wipe off while still wet" concept, you're not alone!! What you want to do is work an area about 2' x 2' with a small amount of #7, applying it in much the same way you would apply a wax, but you'll work that small area a bit longer. If you apply #7 with a foam wax applicator pad you'll feel it start to set up and "drag" a bit after a minute or so - that's a good indicator that it's time to stop applying and start removing. But it's a bit of a heavy product, so wipe off is not as simple as wiping off a thin coat of hazed wax. It's not an arm buster (unless you put in on heavy and let it dry - so don't!) but it does take a bit of wiping to remove it.


If I am using the PRC for correction and following up with a finishing pad, need I let it dry 1st? Also, would this act as a second "coat" since its a AIO?PRC can be wiped off almost immediately or allowed to dry, but allowing to dry will get you the better level of protection. But applying it a second time will not get you a second coat since it's a fairly potent cleaner wax - that second application will very effectively remove the first.

SouthTexasRancher
Mar 18th, 2010, 06:05 PM
Many thanks, Michael. You answered my question very well. I like the idea of re-clay-bar'ing, then the #7 polish, and finally the Gold Class Liquid Wax.

And yes you explained the how long after applying the #7 before wiping off by actually polishing somewhat as compared to the apply, allow to dry to a haze and then buff off with a micro-fiber towel the wax.

Being that I'm in South Texas the 3 month figure would most likely be closer to 6 weeks or so. That's about tops down here for almost any product (even though some companies claim their product lasts a year....yeah right...LOL)

Anyway you've cleared everything up for me and I definitely appreciate it.

Mike

SouthTexasRancher
Mar 18th, 2010, 06:20 PM
Thanks also to Murr1525. Nice to find a place where so many are willing to help each other.

detrivore
Apr 14th, 2010, 05:33 AM
effective protection

93'240sx
Jul 4th, 2010, 12:09 PM
this is a very helpful thread, just when you think you've got the jist of everything you learn somethin new! i cant wait to get my car re-sprayed, ive got CC failure :(

pmason718
Nov 10th, 2010, 04:22 PM
Uh oh... I've been using D151 and not letting it fully dry on the paint... However I haven't had any complaints... But looks like I'm going to change my technique and allow it to dry just in case.


I was doing the same thing, even do my trailer was looking wonderful I'm going to let it dry next time and see what happens. I usually apply NXT 2.0 after D151 even though its not mandatory

JoeCamel
Mar 7th, 2011, 05:05 AM
wow, thanks for the clarification. i was letting my uc dry and find it a challenge to remove. will apply and wipe off from now on.

BodyInkMustang
Nov 18th, 2011, 09:37 AM
After taking the 101 class, i tried to tell people they were doing it wrong. Now theres written proof! thanks guys!

Murr1525
Nov 18th, 2011, 10:22 AM
People still wont believe you....