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Michael Stoops
Dec 15th, 2009, 03:01 PM
How to tell if your wax is dry - The Swipe Test (https://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?39350-How-to-tell-if-your-wax-is-dry-The-Swipe-Test)

Q: Do I let Meguiar's waxes dry completely before removal, or do you take them off right after application?
A: Let them dry fully before removal.

Q: OK, so how do I know if my wax is dry and ready to remove?:nervous1
A: Do the swipe test!:woot2

Q: Uh, OK, but what the heck is the swipe test?:dunno
A: Glad you asked!:dp:


But before we answer, let's take a quick look at the waxing process itself. The two most common, and biggest, mistakes people make when waxing a car is to apply the wax too heavy, and take it off too soon. Much of that comes from using old school, heavy paste carnauba waxes. Back in the day these waxes could be a real challenge to use because if you did let them dry they could be very difficult to remove. And the thicker you applied them, the harder the removal. And, like we said, most people tend to apply wax too thick in the first place. It becomes a vicious cycle!

So you want to apply your wax in as thin a coat as possible, but also in as uniform a coat as possible. Whether you apply wax by hand or with a tool such as an orbital buffer or dual action polisher like Meguair's G110v2 makes no difference - the bottom line is you want a thin, uniform coat. No matter how thick you apply any wax, only so much of it can bond to the surface. Using too much just wastes product, lengthens the drying process, and makes removal more difficult. That's a lose-lose-lose proposition. :furious1

If you find simply waxing a car to be hard work, and your arms are dead tired when you're done, you're doing it wrong.

Applying a thin coat of wax to a well prepared surface is like spreading warm butter on a china plate. Removing that thin layer once it's dry should be almost effortless. A quick wipe with a clean, dry microfiber towel is all it takes.

So what's too thick, and what's thin enough? Look at the picture below - on the left side is a thin coat of wax, on the right is a heavy coat of the exact same wax. Too heavy. Far too heavy. Do NOT let your car look like the right side of this test panel next time you wax.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1348/light_heavy_waxapp.jpg


All right, now that you're putting down a properly thin coat of wax, let it dry. Yes, you can cover all the painted surfaces of a full sized car or SUV and then wait 10 to 15 minutes before doing the swipe test. If the weather is hot and dry, like Southern California in July, the wax may dry much faster than that. If it's cool and humid, like Detroit in September, it may take a bit longer to dry. Also, some waxes just dry faster than others. There are too many variables involved to give an exact time frame, so use the Swipe Test to your advantage. And here's how:

Using your index finger, and making sure it's clean and dry (that's really important!) quickly and briskly swipe it against the dried (drying?) wax to reveal the paint below. If the resulting swipe is smeared and streaky, that means the wax is not yet dry. If the resulting swipe is clear and glossy, however, then you know the wax is dry and you can begin the simple task of wiping it off. Looking at the image below you can see two swipe marks. The one on the bottom is noticeably smeared and streaked - it was done just a couple of minutes after applying the wax. The one on the top is clear and streak free - it was done about 10 minutes later. This is the look you're going for, this is the indicator that your wax is now fully dry and will wipe off easily with that clean, dry microfiber towel.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1348/swipe_test.jpg

Waxing does not have to be a difficult, painful task. Apply a thin coat and use the Swipe Test to determine dryness and you'll find yourself completing the task in less time, with less effort, and getting a better result in the process.

It's a win-win-win proposition.:xyxthumbs

1970judge
Dec 15th, 2009, 03:25 PM
Good read, i hate living here in the swamp. It is so humid it takes F.O.R.E.V.E.R. to dry.

Clutch34
Dec 15th, 2009, 03:28 PM
Good write up! :xyxthumbs

rmatamorz
Jan 27th, 2010, 12:48 PM
great tip... thanks.

leon_xness
May 14th, 2010, 04:50 PM
Q: Do I let Meguiar's waxes dry completely before removal, or do you take them off right after application?
A: Let them dry fully before removal.

Q: OK, so how do I know if my wax is dry and ready to remove?:nervous1
A: Do the swipe test!:woot2

Q: Uh, OK, but what the heck is the swipe test?:dunno
A: Glad you asked!:dp:


But before we answer, let's take a quick look at the waxing process itself. The two most common, and biggest, mistakes people make when waxing a car is to apply the wax too heavy, and take it off too soon. Much of that comes from using old school, heavy paste carnauba waxes. Back in the day these waxes could be a real challenge to use because if you did let them dry they could be very difficult to remove. And the thicker you applied them, the harder the removal. And, like we said, most people tend to apply wax too thick in the first place. It becomes a vicious cycle!

So you want to apply your wax in as thin a coat as possible, but also in as uniform a coat as possible. Whether you apply wax by hand or with a tool such as an orbital buffer or dual action polisher like Meguair's G110v2 makes no difference - the bottom line is you want a thin, uniform coat. No matter how thick you apply any wax, only so much of it can bond to the surface. Using too much just wastes product, lengthens the drying process, and makes removal more difficult. That's a lose-lose-lose proposition. :furious1

If you find simply waxing a car to be hard work, and your arms are dead tired when you're done, you're doing it wrong.

Applying a thin coat of wax to a well prepared surface is like spreading warm butter on a china plate. Removing that thin layer once it's dry should be almost effortless. A quick wipe with a clean, dry microfiber towel is all it takes.

So what's too thick, and what's thin enough? Look at the picture below - on the left side is a thin coat of wax, on the right is a heavy coat of the exact same wax. Too heavy. Far too heavy. Do NOT let your car look like the right side of this test panel next time you wax.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1348/light_heavy_waxapp.jpg


All right, now that you're putting down a properly thin coat of wax, let it dry. Yes, you can cover all the painted surfaces of a full sized car or SUV and then wait 10 to 15 minutes before doing the swipe test. If the weather is hot and dry, like Southern California in July, the wax may dry much faster than that. If it's cool and humid, like Detroit in September, it may take a bit longer to dry. Also, some waxes just dry faster than others. There are too many variables involved to give an exact time frame, so use the Swipe Test to your advantage. And here's how:

Using your index finger, and making sure it's clean and dry (that's really important!) quickly and briskly swipe it against the dried (drying?) wax to reveal the paint below. If the resulting swipe is smeared and streaky, that means the wax is not yet dry. If the resulting swipe is clear and glossy, however, then you know the wax is dry and you can begin the simple task of wiping it off. Looking at the image below you can see two swipe marks. The one on the bottom is noticeably smeared and streaked - it was done just a couple of minutes after applying the wax. The one on the top is clear and streak free - it was done about 10 minutes later. This is the look you're going for, this is the indicator that your wax is now fully dry and will wipe off easily with that clean, dry microfiber towel.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1348/swipe_test.jpg

Waxing does not have to be a difficult, painful task. Apply a thin coat and use the Swipe Test to determine dryness and you'll find yourself completing the task in less time, with less effort, and getting a better result in the process.

It's a win-win-win proposition.:xyxthumbs


Does this apply for any type of liquid wax?

Michael Stoops
May 15th, 2010, 07:17 AM
Does this apply for any type of liquid wax?
Sure does.

ChpStcksRlz
May 18th, 2010, 05:24 PM
Oh... I've been wasting my DeepCrystal Carnauba wax then >_<, I guess I'll apply wax to the whole car then I guess I'll wait 15 mins and start taking off the wax. Thanks!

Shizane2002
Jun 4th, 2010, 07:18 AM
I knew it!! Ive had many arguments with people about this. Most have said that you buff right away. I figured out over the years without additional information like this forum that its best to let it completely dry. lololol....I love MOL.

StuSSYsporT
Jun 28th, 2010, 03:38 PM
man.... great write up! cant believe ive been wasting so much wax before :furious1

Imperiex
Jul 24th, 2010, 02:34 PM
This is very informative. For a very long time, I went about applying products in a much less...informed way, to say the least. I used to use Turtle Wax Ice (my mistake), and I had absolutely no idea of what to do after the fact. I would try and wipe it off, but it got really smeared around, and so then I thought I'd made a mistake. For a short time, I didn't wipe it off at all. Granted, this is ICE we're talking about here. It doesn't dry white. It just sits there like baby oil.

But alas, Meguiars did come along and help me out. I learned from my errors. Although I was discouraged after my time with Black Magic Wet Shine Car Wax (to be fair, I only tried it once. And only on my roof. I didn't really give it much chance. It was just way too hard to take off for a 16 year old), I kept on trying.

Eventually, I found my favorite. A girl I knew in high school new how badly I wanted to try it, and so she got me the paste version of NXT 2.0 Wax. Now, I am not fond of pastes, but it works phenomenally. But it has made me somewhat lazy. See, I've stopped counting the time it takes to dry. I'll wait a half an hour before I go back out there and take it off. Why? Because I can. With NXT, it just doesn't seem to matter.

Maybe I am wrong, but it seems to work out fairly well in the case of the legend.

whirledpeaz
Jul 25th, 2010, 04:55 AM
man.... great write up! cant believe ive been wasting so much wax before :furious1

You're not the only one, I thought it was supposed to look like the one on the right and if my right arm was still attached, then I did it wrong!:read1

TOGWT
Jul 25th, 2010, 06:12 AM
Very informative post

Bill Davidson
Aug 20th, 2010, 11:01 PM
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1348/light_heavy_waxapp.jpg

Isn't the wax on the left applied a little too thick as well. Was this just so the camera could pick it up? Normally, I apply an ultra thin coat, that's just barely visible. Very little white is showing in my wax, when I apply it.

Murr1525
Aug 20th, 2010, 11:14 PM
Could be thinner.

Ravi_1992
Aug 21st, 2010, 01:04 AM
I apply my wax thinner than that too, or the picture might just look thick because of the way the light is hitting the wax. This is a very good post because it actually shows everybody what a thin Layer of wax is compared to a thick layer instead of just telling people to apply thin ( when they might have no idea of how thin is thin and what considered to be thick ):doublethumbsup2

Ravi_1992
Aug 21st, 2010, 01:08 AM
This is very informative. For a very long time, I went about applying products in a much less...informed way, to say the least. I used to use Turtle Wax Ice (my mistake), and I had absolutely no idea of what to do after the fact. I would try and wipe it off, but it got really smeared around, and so then I thought I'd made a mistake. For a short time, I didn't wipe it off at all. Granted, this is ICE we're talking about here. It doesn't dry white. It just sits there like baby oil.

But alas, Meguiars did come along and help me out. I learned from my errors. Although I was discouraged after my time with Black Magic Wet Shine Car Wax (to be fair, I only tried it once. And only on my roof. I didn't really give it much chance. It was just way too hard to take off for a 16 year old), I kept on trying.

Eventually, I found my favorite. A girl I knew in high school new how badly I wanted to try it, and so she got me the paste version of NXT 2.0 Wax. Now, I am not fond of pastes, but it works phenomenally. But it has made me somewhat lazy. See, I've stopped counting the time it takes to dry. I'll wait a half an hour before I go back out there and take it off. Why? Because I can. With NXT, it just doesn't seem to matter.

Maybe I am wrong, but it seems to work out fairly well in the case of the legend.

I didn't like TW ice polish/wax either ( was slippery and baby oil like ) , it was hard to remove and not durable at all. It works great on the trim though

Michael Stoops
Aug 23rd, 2010, 09:54 AM
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1348/light_heavy_waxapp.jpg

Isn't the wax on the left applied a little too thick as well. Was this just so the camera could pick it up? Normally, I apply an ultra thin coat, that's just barely visible. Very little white is showing in my wax, when I apply it.

It's more a function of the lighting - look at the top of the image and the left side looks thinner up top than toward the bottom. But I can assure you, it's actually uniform top to bottom but the panel was at a sharp angle to the light so it appears to change as you look closer to the bottom of the image.

How about the image below, looking at the freshly applied wax in the lower right quadrant as defined by the tape? Does that look better? Because that's how we teach proper D/A applied wax in our Saturday Classes (this image was taken during a recent class).
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/500/IMG_0083m.JPG

TFSweet
Oct 1st, 2010, 11:31 AM
Great post, thanks for the useful information!

stamford
Oct 18th, 2010, 12:11 AM
Excellent. I was quite confused about the swipe test but not anymore. Also, do you think a brand new Black car needs a 5 step process?

l SIC l
Nov 17th, 2010, 07:21 AM
Questions:

1) Because those coats are so thin, is it 'necessary' to apply a second coat, and would there be a significant difference by applying that second coat?

2) Is it OK if I apply the wax to the entire car before I start wiping off? (assume this is applied in a garage at around 16-20 degrees Celsius), so what I mean is, if wax was sitting on a panel for around 30-35 minutes before wiping off even though it may have dried in 10-15 minutes, could it become difficult to remove/ cause any sort of hazing in the paint, etc.?

Cheers!

Murr1525
Nov 17th, 2010, 07:49 AM
1) Nothing is 'needed', we can always do what we feel like. The idea is that by trying to keep the coat thin so it looks good, removes easily, you may miss a spot. So the chance of missing the same spot twice is pretty low, and if it adds a little more wax to the surface, even better.

2) Usually you will want to apply to the whole car, then wait the 10-15 etc minutes from when you finished.

l SIC l
Nov 17th, 2010, 08:04 AM
Noted, cheers!

Michael Stoops
Nov 17th, 2010, 08:18 AM
Questions:

1) Because those coats are so thin, is it 'necessary' to apply a second coat, and would there be a significant difference by applying that second coat?It's really because the coats are so thin that we recommend applying two coats, just to ensure uniform coverage and appearance. Keep in mind this practice has nothing to do with the concept of layering, far from it. Especially on lighter colored vehicles, a very thin application of wax can be difficult to see, so a second light coat helps to ensure that uniform coverage. You may be thinking that a single heavy coat would be equivalent but it really isn't. That single heavy coat will take longer to dry and could promote smearing or difficult removal. And if you still miss a spot, what then?


2) Is it OK if I apply the wax to the entire car before I start wiping off? (assume this is applied in a garage at around 16-20 degrees Celsius), so what I mean is, if wax was sitting on a panel for around 30-35 minutes before wiping off even though it may have dried in 10-15 minutes, could it become difficult to remove/ cause any sort of hazing in the paint, etc.?

Cheers!
Again, we recommend covering all the painted surfaces of the car and then starting your clock. A lot of people will wash and dry the car, pull it in the garage and apply a coat of wax. Then, while the wax is drying, they'll do all the rest of the processes involved in keeping up the appearance of their vehicle; vacuum the interior, clean the inside of the windows, dress the interior vinyl, plastic and leather, dress the tires and wheel wells and then put away all their detailing supplies. By the time all of that is done the wax has been drying for an hour or more and it will still wipe off with extreme ease.

While some people have experimented with leaving a coat of wax on the paint for many hours before removal and found it to still be very easy to wipe off, there are potential downsides to that. First, letting the wax sit too long in an area prone to dust (my old garage, for example :angry1) means wiping off dried wax with a bunch of dust on it. Not good. Second, if you apply a slightly heavy coat of wax in a very high humidity area, the hazing product will start to pull moisture out of the air and wipe off can become quite difficult, and there is a very high probability of streaking. But there is nothing to gain by letting the wax sit on the car for, say, six hours before removal. Don't get caught up in the whole "if some is good, more is better" false line of thinking.

So, apply a thin layer to all the painted surfaces of the vehicle and let it dry fully before removal. You can take it off as soon as it's dry, but if you wait an hour or even two, it won't be any more difficult to wipe off. If you're going to err on one side or the other, let the wax dry a bit longer than you think it should rather than trying to remove it too soon.

l SIC l
Nov 17th, 2010, 08:46 AM
Thank you very much for that rundown Michael and trust me I am taking all these notes down. One thing though. I can now understand now how applying a uniform coat of wax that is too thick can prove to be unnecessary and be more hassle then it's worth... so would a 'light-medium' layer of wax (assuming I haven't missed an area of the paint) be alright and compensate for those two light layers? I mean, it's not as if I'm just blotching it on the paint, but to have a uniform 'light-medium' layer seems as if it would just make the process easier without too much repercussion... if there is slight streaking becoming apparent then I'm sure UQD/UQW would be able to sort it out?

I'm not trying to sound arrogant towards what you guys have been doing for years, I am just curious as I'm not sure how two thin layers would be more beneficial than a 'light-medium' coat :S

Michael Stoops
Nov 17th, 2010, 09:13 AM
Not taking this as arrogance at all, so don't sweat it.

And also don't overthink this process. As Murr pointed out, nothing is "needed". We make recommendations based on most common scenarios, and when most people are laying down a very thin coat of wax they find it hard to see where they have and haven't applied it, hence the recommendation for two thin coats. But the visual clues that tell you whether you've covered a spot or not are sort of an acquired skill - it really isn't that hard to see where you have and haven't applied wax to a silver car if you know what to look for.

Whether you're applying by hand or D/A, if you can indeed see where you've applied and are confident that you've got full coverage, then a second coat isn't going to gain you much. And we'd still rather see you do a single light coat rather than use any more than really necessary, just in case you start seeing drying issues as temperatures drop or humidity rises, depending on time of year. It's all about "best practices", really. That said, we are also firm believers that "if it works for you and you're happy with the results" we aren't going to chastise you for "doing it wrong".

RubenG
Feb 25th, 2011, 03:15 PM
Thanks, Im a Newbie and need all the info I can get.

zbestwun2001
Aug 6th, 2011, 09:25 AM
I'm sorry.. I was tired after I waxed my car...

Dedy
Apr 29th, 2012, 07:47 AM
Thanks Mike, this is my first time waxing, and I've got all the information how to wax my car.
Just 1 simple question Mike, since I'm using white car, which men its a light car :), like you said, its very difficult to see the thin coat, I just wondering, how much the liquid wax(I'm using nxt2.0) should I apply to the applicator pad? Any suggestions? Thanks.

Dedy

fcms*2012
Nov 15th, 2012, 04:16 PM
This also applies to paste wax especially with the thickness...

jhhodges
Nov 16th, 2012, 01:22 PM
Oh... I've been wasting my DeepCrystal Carnauba wax then >_<, I guess I'll apply wax to the whole car then I guess I'll wait 15 mins and start taking off the wax. Thanks!

Which got me to thinking.... Is there any kind of "drop dead" date/age beyond which a product should no longer be used and discarded. I have an almost full can of this wax that is at least 15 years old. It has been stored in its own tightly sealed container, in a horizontal position, and not exposed to any freezing temperatures. It has a crack across the middle and is just slightly loose in the can.

What do you think? Still Ok to use?

Murr1525
Nov 16th, 2012, 01:31 PM
As long as it isnt showing any signs of separating, should be fine.

Michael Stoops
Nov 16th, 2012, 02:23 PM
Which got me to thinking.... Is there any kind of "drop dead" date/age beyond which a product should no longer be used and discarded. I have an almost full can of this wax that is at least 15 years old. It has been stored in its own tightly sealed container, in a horizontal position, and not exposed to any freezing temperatures. It has a crack across the middle and is just slightly loose in the can.

What do you think? Still Ok to use?
Paste waxes, when properly sealed as you've described, can have extremely long usable life spans. A crack across the middle and a little pulling away from the side of the can (a bit of shrinkage, if you will) is perfectly normal and the wax should still be completely fine. If it's crumbling and falling apart then probably not.

For liquid products of a lotion like viscosity (liquid waxes, paint cleaners, compounds, etc) we usually expect a shelf life of 3 to 5 years provided they aren't exposed to long term temperature extremes. One solid freeze/thaw cycle will usually kill these products, and prolonged exposure to high heat (sitting in the trunk of your car for a week in 100F temps, for example) will, too. But without this sort of exposure we've seen these products still perfectly viable after 10, 15 years or more. The tell tale is this: shake up the product thoroughly and if it pours out of the bottle in a smooth, consistent flow like you expect it to, then it should still be good regardless of age. But if even prolonged, vigorous shaking won't mix it together and it pours out either watery or lumpy, then it's shot. If it has a horrible odor to it, it's shot.

Liquid products of a water like viscosity (glass cleaners, quick detailers, etc) are a bit more resilient to temp extremes, but even they can be damaged by very prolonged exposure.

jhhodges
Nov 16th, 2012, 04:33 PM
Thanks, Murr1525.

Thanks, Michael.

It still looks and "feels" good except for the crack and "looseness".

The address on the can includes Newport Beach instead of Irvine. I have shoes that are 30 years old.

Thanks, again.:thankyou1

Quaza75
Nov 20th, 2012, 07:02 PM
okay I had no idea how to wax my car never did it before today I came here and seen this wonderful writeup and thought I'll try it. I was pleased with the result to say the least, I like doing it all my hand myself I tried the machine I got from a friend didn't like the results as I did when I did it by hand Little note about the car and where I live I live in Michigan this Nov day it was about 55 out little warmer for us this time of year, my car is a 97 Chrysler Sebring Convertible cherry red paint I did some rust removal on the back quarter panels and wanted to buff up the areas where I worked on so I decided to do the whole car focusing mainly on those 2 areas. This car seen almost 250k miles of Michigan roads and yes the car runs and drive like new and looks like it too after I put some time and work and waxing her but I do have couple questions first I used your Meguiar's Cleaner Wax paste did the entire car then waited for about 10 to 15 minutes then wiped it all off with a microfiber cloth that itself left a great shine that I have never seen on this car (I owned it for about four years), my question is this after applying the Cleaner Wax I went ahead for the second coat I used the Ultimate Compound, was this too much too soon or was this okay?? also near the tire wells on my car mainly the 2 front wells because those are the drive wheels I have tar and other road junk built up on the bottom on the paint, anything in your product closet you recommend to clean that area up back to the original paint

davey g-force
Nov 20th, 2012, 08:43 PM
^^ No harm done, but you used the products the wrong way around (in the wrong order). You should go back and re-wax the car now after using UC.

Use the Cleaner Wax if that's all you have, but something like NXT or Ultimate Wax would be better.

Quaza75
Nov 20th, 2012, 09:31 PM
I used the cleaner wax first then the ultimate compound you saying I did it backwards?

I thought the cleaner wax removes any wax that was on the car so I figure using the cleaner first the using the UC would bring the car closer to the show room shine which what I was after

Murr1525
Nov 21st, 2012, 07:10 AM
Perhaps we should have this moved to a new thread, or start a new one if you want to go more in depth, but here is a basic answer:


first I used your Meguiar's Cleaner Wax paste did the entire car then waited for about 10 to 15 minutes then wiped it all off with a microfiber cloth that itself left a great shine that I have never seen on this car (I owned it for about four years),

OK, good.


my question is this after applying the Cleaner Wax I went ahead for the second coat I used the Ultimate Compound, was this too much too soon or was this okay??

Yes, this is backwards.

Generally, you want to have your detail look like:
1. Wash
2. Clay if needed
3. Clean
4. Polish - Optional
5. Wax
6. Wax - 2 thin coats are best
7. Maintain - A spray wax is nice after future washes inbetween details.

So, with those products, what you should look at is:

1. Wash
2. Clay - Smooth Surface clay kit
3. Clean - Ult. Compound is a stronger cleaner, to remove dirt and then can remove swirls/some scratches if worked in enough/properly.
4. Cleaner/Wax - This product is a mild cleaner/polish/wax, so kind of covers steps 3-5 above. It would make sense to use the mild cleaner after the strong one, and this product leaves wax behind, so you would want to use it last, not use it and then remove the wax.
5. Wax - Many people will buy a regular wax, like Ult. Wax, Nxt 2.0, Gold Class +, etc to use as the second coat of wax. If you used the cleaner/wax twice in a row, the cleaner would work to remove the wax from the first coat.


3. also near the tire wells on my car mainly the 2 front wells because those are the drive wheels I have tar and other road junk built up on the bottom on the paint, anything in your product closet you recommend to clean that area up back to the original paint

I would look at TarX or TRIX (tar + iron dust [usually brake dust]).

So Wash, TRIX, clay, clean, polish, wax, wax.

Murr1525
Nov 21st, 2012, 07:15 AM
I thought the cleaner wax removes any wax that was on the car so I figure using the cleaner first the using the UC would bring the car closer to the show room shine which what I was after

As noted above, the 'cleaner' part of the Cleaner/Wax would work to remove wax, but then the 'wax' part would leave wax behind on the surface.

Then the UC just removed the wax right away.

Quaza75
Nov 21st, 2012, 03:46 PM
I did as you have suggested Murr I reapply the cleaner wax waited the time frame then put on a coat of the Ultimate Wax (of course all from the same company) looks good

but when applying the final Wax what the best way to do it, do the entire car then using the microfiber cloth buff it up or do one section or panel at a time?

davey g-force
Nov 21st, 2012, 05:27 PM
Ultimate Wax is a bit different, in that you apply to a panel or two at a time, then buff off.

Any other Meguiars wax, you would apply to the whole car, wait a while for it to haze, then buff off.

Murr1525
Nov 21st, 2012, 07:27 PM
Ultimate Wax is a bit different, in that you apply to a panel or two at a time, then buff off.

Any other Meguiars wax, you would apply to the whole car, wait a while for it to haze, then buff off.

Ult. Wax Liquid that is.

benzw205
Nov 21st, 2015, 12:14 PM
Thank you from a newbie, I will try not to apply too much of the liquid wax.

Can I know what is the risk of letting it dry too long ? Any risk for the paint / result ?

The Guz
Nov 21st, 2015, 09:27 PM
Thank you from a newbie, I will try not to apply too much of the liquid wax.

Can I know what is the risk of letting it dry too long ? Any risk for the paint / result ?

If you are referring to ultimate liquid wax, it doe snot haze like a traditional wax. It can be removed after 3-5 min. on the area it has been applied to.

billddrummer
Apr 28th, 2019, 05:37 PM
I believe my wax application was half way between the recommended and not recommended. Normally I remove by hand but today I

Parkman
Sep 12th, 2019, 07:28 PM
Thank you for the excellent advice. I

Parkman
Sep 12th, 2019, 07:37 PM
Thank you for the excellent advice. I

Old Bear
Sep 13th, 2019, 07:37 AM
BillDDrummer and Parkman
It is probable the the devices you are using and the related fonts are sending an "end of message" character string when you enter the apostrophe.
Try your messages again without using contractions. Spell it out like "I have" or "I would".

Parkman
Sep 13th, 2019, 08:38 AM
Thank you. It is appreciated