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Jeff Burrows
Dec 17th, 2004, 04:13 PM
Now with the buffing!

Step.1 Place the blue painters masking tape on the rubber surrounding the windows and door handles, etc. This helps a lot because you dont have wipe the trim as much once you have finished buffing.

Step.2 I reccomend using the "Swirl free polish No. 82" with meguiars red foam cutting pad. I only would use the wool pad if you are not removing the haze and remember when you do use the wool pad you uasually have a lot of lint that flies everywhere and can stick to your compound. (When this does happen I use a power washer to removee the mess 2500 PSI then dry it) I would use the buffer @ 1400 RPMS then go to no more than 2000 RPMS depending on what compound and pad you are using. IF YOU ARE NOT SURE OF YOUR PAINT FINSH CALL MEGUIARS OR YOU CAR MANUFACTURER! Eg. clear coat, etc.

Step.3 The buffing step is the most importent step so take time to make sure you are removing the & haze because the copound can somtimes hide it more than remove the haze.

step.4 When you are finished there should minimal to no orange peal and some swirls. If you used the wool pad go to the red pad with the "SFP 82" then go to the Swirl Remover 2.0 with the yellow pad. And after that for a deep gloss (Opt.) I like the beige pad with the 2.0 to give it a deep dramatic gloss. (Compliments of Meguiars) When you finished these steps go over the whole car to make sure there are no rough spots and ereas that were not buffed out.

Step.5 Use a polish of your choice to finish the car and put on MEGUIARS No.16 carnuba hand wax or Polymer sealant. These wax always finish the best and will last the longest. Remember a colorsanded car does not go unoticed and is great achievment especially when donr right.


Step.6 SHOW OFF YOU CAR! Remember to always keep you work srface free of dust when color sanding !

Tim Lingor
Dec 18th, 2004, 02:04 PM
Hey,

Thanks for the write-up. :)

However, my experience with wet sanding has been a little different than yours. Over the years, I have hit both incredibly hard or soft paint. Either way, I have always needed to go more aggressive, using products like #85 Diamond Cut 2.0 and a W-4000 Wool pad. Or, at minimum, #84 Compound Power Cleaner and a W-7006 Cutting Pad. I have found these products are necessary to remove both the sanding marks as well as the odd tracer. I then follow the previous compounds with #83 Dual Action Cleaner Polish and a W-8006 Polishing pad to remove the haze as well as restoring a very high gloss.

Using #82 Swirl Free Polish, which is a really mild cleaner/polish, will tend to break down way too fast especially with a W-7006 Cutting pad which tends to create a lot of friction and heat. Perhaps you were wet sanding/buffing out an extremely soft paint?

I think it would also be prudent of me to mention at this point, that wet sanding a daily driver is risky, IMHO. It may after the removal of .3 mils, lead to clear coat failure. As such, I generally avoid wet sanding OEM paint. Instead, I save the job for freshly painted cars that are destined for Car Shows. These cars will usually have more clear sprayed on, as it is expected to be sanded/buffed out anyway. :)

Tim

Jeff Burrows
Dec 18th, 2004, 03:27 PM
Ya tim,
you have a great point about the thickness of the paint. I am SUPER careful with my paint in my Truck, expedition, explorer. I explained the compounds for the novice colorsanders and not for the experienced detailer. I try use the least aggressive and move up only if I have to.
Jeff Burrows

Tim Lingor
Dec 19th, 2004, 05:31 PM
Thanks for the reply! :)

Again, unless the paint you have worked on was incredibly soft, I have never used only #82 to remove the sanding marks. But I agree, one should always use the least aggressive product to get the job done. :)

Do you have some photos of your work? Specifically of you wet sanding/buffing out a finish? I just love full on sun shots of a perfectly smooth, swirl-free finish!

Tim

Jeff Burrows
Dec 20th, 2004, 06:21 AM
I will try to get some to you!

Jimmy Buffit
Dec 20th, 2004, 03:42 PM
Wow. Sort of a scary thread. For those of you that are new to wetsanding, PLEASE be careful, and read/research well beyond this thread.

Not something I'd do very often in my shop. And certainly would not attempt it without my $450 paint thickness guage.

Again, tread softly...

Jim

Tim Lingor
Dec 20th, 2004, 03:51 PM
Originally posted by Jimmy Buffit
Wow. Sort of a scary thread. For those of you that are new to wetsanding, PLEASE be careful, and read/research well beyond this thread.

Not something I'd do very often in my shop. And certainly would not attempt it without my $450 paint thickness guage.

Again, tread softly...

Jim

Hey Jim,

I could not AGREE more!! :xyxthumbs

I tried to empasize that in my write-up

http://www.meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=3838

A mistake can be VERY costly!! :(

Tim

Jeff Burrows
Jan 9th, 2005, 09:07 AM
Dear tim sorry I have not bee able to get some pics to you. I did not take after the job so I will take som after the rain thank you for your patience.