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View Full Version : New Use For Ultimate Compound?



SuburbanGuy20
Apr 14th, 2010, 07:27 AM
Ok, one thing I have seen a lot of, is when your headlights get yellowed out and oxodized, the first thing I know most people reach for is the 3 wet sandpaper's, and the bottle of PlastiX wax/ polish to see if it can clean it all off.

Rather than break my back with all that scrubbing and sanding, I have found that a thin ribbon of the Ultimate Compound either hand applied, or buffed at a low speed, can clear away pretty much any rather harsh oxidation and yellowing from the clear plastic on your headlights.

The headlights on my mom's 2001 Mazda Tribute suffered from that same problem and I actually learned the hard way, what all that sanding and buffing can do to your hands, should you slip (sliced my hand with the paper). The Ultimate Compound cuts right through the oxidation and doesn't leave any nasty residues on the plastic.

Hope this works for yall. TTYL

Shawn T.
Apr 16th, 2010, 08:06 AM
I have alos tried this and this works beautifully on headlights that are not completely yellow. For almost all headlights, I could get away with a UC or M105 ribbon followed by something else but for the really bad headlights I have the sandpaper and Plastx combo.

JoeDirt
Apr 16th, 2010, 08:10 PM
I've always used Finish Restore (3M) and/or PlastX on headlights, never been a fan of the tedious process of sandpaper unless they're completely trashed. Pointless in my book when you get very, very good results with compound.

DetailFreak517
Apr 16th, 2010, 09:07 PM
Considering you can get effective results using toothpaste, I would imagine any sort of polish should do fine.

Jossy92
Apr 18th, 2010, 06:48 AM
Considering you can get effective results using toothpaste, I would imagine any sort of polish should do fine.

Never thought that. What's you technique?

Cole Ziegler
Apr 21st, 2010, 07:36 PM
Toothpaste works.

You can also use UC for light polishing on car bras that have gotten contaminated.

J. A. Michaels
Apr 22nd, 2010, 01:03 AM
Toothpaste works.

You can also use UC for light polishing on car bras that have gotten contaminated.

Never tried this. Thanks for the tip.

Cole Ziegler
Apr 22nd, 2010, 07:25 PM
No problem. Ive had best luck using it with a microfiber towel and applying light pressure moving in circle motions. It gets the job done, (plus car bras are usually 8 mil plastic so thats roughly 200 microns thick), and can immensely improve the clarity of the plastic.

Imperiex
Jul 3rd, 2010, 11:09 AM
Just a note for people to be aware of. I'm not sure of the credibility of this source, so if anybody knows for sure, that would be great. But I have heard that sanding headlights can lead to further damage.

From what this source claims, there are UV protectants on the surface of the headlight, so when you sand that, it gets rid of them. Immediately it looks better, but it will yellow faster in the future.

Perhaps the oxidizing has a limit on how fast it can happen and the difference wouldn't be very noticeable (time wise). But, until I know for sure, I guess I'm going to be careful with it. Anybody know for sure on this?

Murr1525
Jul 3rd, 2010, 11:23 AM
Many lights have a thin film on the surface of them. Sort of like reading glasses.

But if the film is already failing, not really losing a whole lot. But regular maintenance may be needed.

Megafast13
Jul 3rd, 2010, 09:05 PM
M105 is also recommended for headlights. It's very similar to UC

David32
Jul 21st, 2010, 02:21 AM
I know this is way off topic and dumb in a way, but I tested UC on my vision glasses.. their old and have a bunch of scratches which is really why I don't use em anymore, but it didnt make a difference. I was once told that toothpaste works, but not really.

zbestwun2001
Aug 26th, 2011, 03:29 PM
Toothpaste works.

.

It did "help" mine a bit, but mine were not yellow or really really cloudy. I wanted them clearer though. I am still going to buy some compound I think and rub them out.
It shouldn't take too much elbow grease on mine. Being that it's 103 outside right now and was 75 at 6a.m. I might wait for this heatwave to pass.

ethereal45
Sep 16th, 2011, 08:45 PM
Someone here posted a review of D151 PRC and it did a great job on the headlights.

GhOsT1321
Oct 12th, 2011, 08:42 AM
I know this is way off topic and dumb in a way, but I tested UC on my vision glasses.. their old and have a bunch of scratches which is really why I don't use em anymore, but it didnt make a difference. I was once told that toothpaste works, but not really. UC can scratch plastic and clear coat, but the abrasives in it are not harder than glass. There will be very minimal, if any, true scratch removal from glass using UC. Essentially, anything that makes something shinier/clearer via abrasives, is just putting many, finer scratches in the surface that are less visible.

zbestwun2001
Oct 12th, 2011, 12:30 PM
For me it worked like a charm... headlights are clear as can be... great tip.

zbestwun2001
Oct 15th, 2011, 02:29 PM
Mine weren't bad... but it really helped..

BEFORE:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v204/zbestwun2001/Cc2.jpg
AFTER:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v204/zbestwun2001/car1-1.jpg

kurtb2080
Apr 2nd, 2012, 03:57 PM
Definitely will try this on moms lights, starting to get patchy with oxidation...

Will put up before and after pics.

Murr1525
Apr 2nd, 2012, 04:49 PM
Remember to use the Headlight Protectant, or at least wax after...

Jossy92
Apr 3rd, 2012, 11:40 AM
I have heard that sanding headlights can lead to further damage..... Anybody know for sure on this?

Here's some feedback for hand application. by no means expert advice, but we may get some. ;) (I have only used sandpaper 4 of 5 times and not sure if the way I used it is gentler than UC or would appropriate prior UC.)

I followed the directions I found here on the forum to the letter in terms wetness (can't remember the directions at the moment).

I applied virtually no pressure as I began sanding and as soon as the surface felt slippery I went to the finishing paper and did the same thing. The paper did all the cutting and my touch felt so light it seemed like I was only taking the "fur" off the plastic. Then I used the UC.

Prior to this, I had used just the compound, but even though the abrasives were much smaller than that of the paper, the finger tip pressure needed was much more than I was comfortable with and "trial and error" wasn't an option with plastic..

Got good results compared to muscling the compond which gave me no feedback as to whether I was overdoing it. As an experienced newb, Scratches can be caused by pressure, regardless the product used. That from minimum experience with UC.

Murr1525
Apr 3rd, 2012, 12:10 PM
"Further damage" would likely be from UV damage. Headlights will have a UV protective coating over them, which sanding, or other strong cleaning will remove.

However, if the headlights are badly deteriorated already, the coating is already gone anyway.

After you do your cleaning, you just want to be sure to keep cleaning/waxing them or using the Headlight Protectant, etc so keep them in good shape.