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View Full Version : 17. Do car waxes provide real UV protection?



Mike Phillips
Jan 6th, 2005, 12:27 PM
17. Do car waxes provide real UV protection? (http://www.meguiars.com/faq/_index.cfm?faqCat=General%20Questions&faqQuestionID=18&section=_18#_18)

Some waxes do contain UV-protection agents, but the amount of protection that a microscopically thin layer of wax can provide is limited

The primary goal of a wax is to protect the top layers of paint that contain UV-protection agents from the paint manufacture. If you wash and wax your car regularly, your paint will be protected and you should suffer no major UV damage over the normal course of the life of the car.

Don't be fooled by some companies that lead you to believe that it is the UV protection in a wax that protects your car's finish from fading and failure, this is dishonest and simply not true. Taking care of the paint you presently have will go further to protect your finish than relying on protection supplied by a liquid you pour out of a bottle, or a wax you scoop out of a can. UV protection in a car wax formula is only an extra-dose of preventative maintenance, not the end-all, cure-all that some companies would lead you to believe.

UV protection for paint is much different from UV blocking ingredients for human skin. The two formulas are nothing alike and work in drastically different ways. There is no correlation between the ratings applied to the different levels of sun blocking protection for products intended for use on human skin and the ingredients available for use in an automotive wax formula. Sad to say, much of what you see advertised about the protective qualities of most car care products on the market today is simply over-exaggerated hype used to separate you from your hard earned dollars.

G Force
Dec 19th, 2007, 09:03 AM
Hello Mike,

Thank you for the info about UV.

On Fridays i use a open air parking,the sun hits hard at this time of year.
I notice vapors coming out of well maintained vehicles roofs.
Would these vapors be evaporating wax ?

Thanks :cool:

Murr1525
Dec 19th, 2007, 09:10 AM
Are you sure it isnt just heat haze?

G Force
Dec 19th, 2007, 09:15 AM
Hello Murr1525,

The vapors look just like the ones coming out of a jet plane engine when it's going slow on a run way.

No vapors from neglected cars.

Murr1525
Dec 19th, 2007, 09:31 AM
Sounds like heat haze, but dont know why some would have it and some wouldnt....

Mike Phillips
Dec 19th, 2007, 09:45 AM
On Fridays i use a open air parking,the sun hits hard at this time of year.
I notice vapors coming out of well maintained vehicles roofs.
Would these vapors be evaporating wax ?



No, doesn't sound like it's evaporating wax, sound like heat haze like Mat stated.

You could always take a can of wax and set it on the roof of your car in the same climatic condition and when you see this haze coming off your roof, look to see if it's also coming off the opened can of wax.

CAShine
Dec 19th, 2007, 02:18 PM
Thanks for the post mike. This is useful information for me as well as my customers.

Sydster
Dec 19th, 2007, 03:07 PM
Thanks for the post mike. This is useful information for me as well as my customers.

:iagree: Very well said Mike. :bigups

G Force
Dec 20th, 2007, 01:27 AM
Thanks Mike and Mat,

I am now reassured.As my English is not so good i had a look for the meaning of haze:A suspension of small particles in the air which reduces visibility by scattering light.
Would wax reflect on air humidity to produce haze ?
Would it be humidity in the air being burnt to that produces haze ?
Why don't neglected cars produce haze ?

Thanks

shamrock
Apr 15th, 2008, 10:21 AM
Hey everyone. Not sure what G Force is refurring to, but I live in Houston and I wash my car like 2- 3 times a week and polish it every week just about. Now here in Houston were it gets up into the 100 degrees heat and humidity is around 80+ percent I have heat haze on my car (2006 Saturn Ion). I have a friend who has a 2007 Lexus GS and that car gets the same treatment as mine does (stays in garage when not in use) and you can see some heat haze off of that during the summer.

Nick Chapman
Jun 4th, 2008, 08:25 AM
That heat haze is going to be different for different color vehicles. White's and silver's tends to be cooler than red's blue's and black paint, therfore the haze coming off of a darker vehicle is going to be more noticable.