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Mike Phillips
Aug 20th, 2010, 05:12 AM
The Free Floating Spindle Assembly - The Story Behind The Story... by Mike Phillips (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=44841)


Below is a reply from Porter Cable taken from another thread on another forum... links have been removed for professional netiquette...



I recently fielded our collective question about what the industry term might be for the 'mechanism'

My question to Porter-Cable
What is the mechanism called that causes the polisher to stop rotation when excessive pressure is exerted upon it?

Some of us are having a discussion on an online auto detailing forum and I incorrectly referred to the mechanism as a 'clutch' (such as my drill has). I'd like to clarify this for the sake of accuracy.

Thanks."

Porter-Cable's reply
Dear James, we believe the following information addresses your inquiry. The pad itself may stop rotating temporarily with excessive pressure, because it is mounted into a free-floating Spindle Bearing Assembly. However the overall mechanism is fixed & therefore never stops orbiting when the machine is running, unless something is damaged or worn.
So there you have it. I guess our 'mechanism' is called a "free-floating Spindle Bearing Assembly"




Thank you to MisterShark for taking the initiative to contact Porter Cable and get their definition, explanation and description of how the mechanism works that makes the Porter Cable DA Polishers both safe, effective and unique.

Note the Meguiar's versions and the Griot's Garage Versions of the Porter Cable Polisher use a similar design, that is these two other polishers also use a Free Floating Spindle Assembly.



In the below pictures, I'm pointing to what's referred to as the Free Rotating Spindle Assemble of a Porter Cable Dual Action Polisher.

Porter Cable 7424XP with the Backing Plate Removed Exposing the
Counterweight and Free Rotating Spindle Assembly
http://www.autogeekonline.net/gallery/data/794/FreeRotatingSpingleAssembley003.jpg

Close-up
http://www.autogeekonline.net/gallery/data/794/FreeRotatingSpingleAssembley004.jpg



From Hand to Machine
In the last 15 to 20 years a lot of people have made the switch from working by hand to working by machine because it's faster and more effective, especially on modern day clear coat paints.


Clear Coat Paints Are Scratch-Sensitive
Modern clear coat paints last longer than traditional single stage paints like the lacquers and enamels that were used to paint cars from the time the Model T was introduced till the early 1980's. In the early 1980's car manufactures began switching over to a new paint system called Basecoat/Clearcoat where the color coat or pigmented layer of paint is sprayed onto the car first and then a layer of clear paint is sprayed over the top of the color coat. Besides being a different approach, the resin used to make the paint changed also.


Longer Lasting
The results are paints that resist oxidation, (oxidation was a huge problem with single stage paints), and last much longer over the service life of the vehicle as compared to single stage paints.


Scratch-Sensitive = Easily Scratched = Eyesore
The problem is people confuse last longer with look good longer and these are two very different things. A modern clear coat finish can last a long time but that doesn't mean it will look good over this period of time. You see clear coat paints are scratch-sensitive, that means even though they tend to be harder than traditional single stage lacquers and enamels, they still scratch very easily and the swirls and scratches show up easily to our eyes because the scratches tend to be opaque or whitish in color and because of this, the colored or pigmented layer reveals and even showcases the swirls and scratches to your eyes making the finish on your car an eyesore in the sun.




The practical differences between single stage paints and a clear coat paints
Early 1965 Mustang with single stage paint and a modern Mustang with a basecoat/clear coat finish
http://www.autogeekonline.net/gallery/data/719/1965.jpghttp://www.autogeekonline.net/gallery/data/719/NewMustang.jpg




Frustration with clearcoat paints
Now let me tie this back to why machine polishing has become so much more popular since clear coat paints were introduced.

As more and more cars being manufactured made their way into the market, as car owners, or in other words, do-it-yourselfers, would try the traditional methods of removing defects out of the paint, that is with traditional rubbing and polishing compounds, they would find that most of these products may remove defects but leave their own defects in the paint at the same time.

Not only that, but because generally speaking, modern clear coats are harder than single stage paints, the energy, time and skill required to actually remove defects out of clear coat paints increased dramatically, and in fact increased to the point that many people attempting to remove defects and restore a shine like their car had when they bought it brand new, left most people feeling frustrated and their cars no better off than when they started and often times worse.


Enter the Porter Cable DA Sander
That's right, I said sander! The Porter Cable Dual Action Sander is the tool that became the Tipping Point that was the driving force behind the average person switching from working by hand to working by machine.


The Porter Cable Dual Action Sander with Wood Dust Collecting Attachment for Sanding Wood
http://www.autogeekonline.net/gallery/data/794/portercableSANDER.jpg



Sanding the old finish off using a Porter Cable Dual Action Sander
http://www.autogeekonline.net/gallery/data/715/2SandingDesk2.jpg



The exact same tool only outfitted with a foam polishing pad for machine polishing automotive clear coat paints
http://www.autogeekonline.net/gallery/data/794/PorterCable7424XP.jpg



The story behind the story...
Here's why the Porter Cable Dual Action Polisher switched people from working by hand to working by machine

1) Safe - Uses a Free Rotating Spindle Assembly for a drive mechanism

2) Faster - Faster and more effective at removing swirls compared to working by hand

Safe - Uses a Free Rotating Spindle Assembly for a drive mechanism
This in my opinion, is the key feature that gave the average person the confidence to work on their car's paint by machine. The biggest fear people have about using a machine to polish their car's paint is the fear of burning though the paint or instilling swirls.

The Porter Cable Dual Action Sander overcomes these problems by using what we now refer to as a Free Rotating Spindle Assemble. This is a unique drive mechanism that will rotate and oscillate a buffing pad at the same time enabling the user to remove swirls, water spots and scratches while at the same time if too much pressure is applied to the buffing pad or if it's held on edge or on top of a body line the pad will simply stop rotating thus prevent the pad from harming the paint.


Faster and more effective at removing swirls compared to working by hand
Besides being safe, it goes without saying that the speed and effectiveness were and still are very important reasons that people accustomed to working by hand switch over to working by machine. Typically, as a person uses the Internet to do research on how to remove swirls out of there car's clear coat finish they discover these things called discussion forums and after a little targeted reading they learn about the Porter Cable Dual Action polisher, commonly referred to as the DA Polisher.

To see how safe these tools really are, check out this video where I place extreme pressure to the back of my hand using a DA Polisher


Pushing down as hard as I can (Screenshot from a TV show, link removed)
http://www.autogeekonline.net/gallery/data/824/FreeRotatingSpindleAssembleyScreenShot01.jpg



That's the story behind the story as to why Dual Action Polishers like the the Meguiar's G110v2 have become so popular.


Yesterday's Trend... Today's Norm...
Today, DA Polishers are the most popular tool among do-it-yourselfers crossing over from working by hand to working by machine. Many Professional Detailers also use the DA Polisher for their follow-up polishing steps after using a rotary buffer to do the major correction work. These tools are the easiest tools to learn how to use and so safe that even my son Rand is able to operate one safely on Nate Truman's 1966 Batmobile Recreation.

Photo courtesy of LacViet Photography
http://www.autogeekonline.net/gallery/data/715/medium/RandBuffingBatmobile1.jpg


So if you're still working by hand... check out the dual action polisher and see if you're ready to move up to machine polishing.


Giving Due Credit Where Credit is Due
Also, it's important to give due credit to where credit is due and it was Meguiar's that introduced the Porter Cable Wood Sander as a "Paint Polisher" to the automotive world to my best knowledge sometime in the early 1990's.

Take from page 2 of this thread,

Surprised to see a Meguiar's G100 at my work (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=29233)



Here's some pictures of my oldest catalogs... am trying to find out if there's any older catalogs than this...

The one on the left is from 1995 and the one on the right is from 1996, the catalog from 1995 documents Meguiar's introducing the G100 at least 13 years ago and before this we were showing people in the Professional Trade how to use air powered DA Sanders to polish paint by using our W5500 Foam Polishing Pad, which if you look closely is the actual pad on the Porter Cable unit pictured below, not a W-8006 on a W64 DA Backing Plate.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/717/1995BrilSolCat001.jpg

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/717/1995BrilSolCat002.jpg


The lettering is kind of fuzzy but you can make out that it says Porter Cable

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/717/1995BrilSolCat004.jpg

Does anyone reading this have an older Brilliant Solutions Catalog?

:scratchhead1


And that's the rest of the story...


:)

J. A. Michaels
Aug 20th, 2010, 09:35 AM
Very informative article as usual, Mike.

Who at Meguiar's first figured out this sander would be effective with car paint?

Mike Phillips
Aug 20th, 2010, 10:03 AM
Very informative article as usual, Mike.


Thanks... I remember when the whole controversy over the use of the word "clutch" erupted and how ridiculous it was and that prompted me to write this article to clear up any confusion and put issue to rest...

The issue over the use of the word "clutch" is a great example of why I write very carefully because there's always someone out there that will try to dissect what I write and make a mountain out of a molehill over the interpretation of a single word.

It's called too much time on their hands but because these types of people exist on detailing discussion forums it forces anyone that writes to choose and use their words more carefully so in the end it's a good thing...



Who at Meguiar's first figured out this sander would be effective with car paint?


I don't know, great question though...

My guess would be one of the field guys... but it could have been anyone... Mike Pennington might know...


:)

bmrfan
Aug 20th, 2010, 12:30 PM
Mike,

Great article - you covered a lot of topics and I hope readers spend the time to absorb it all.

The topic of Clear Coat scratch-sensitivity is an interesting one - I agree 100% that a scratch in Clear Coat will be an eye-sore because its shows up as an opaque or white-color defect. However, in general, I think most clear coats are more scratch / swirl / scuff resistant than single stage pigmented paints.

My observation - it seems that two-stage paints don't really suffer from paint oxidation like single-stage paints BUT are more visually impacted from scratches / swirls / scuffing (especially on dark colors).

On the topic of who figured out a DA polisher would be good for 2 stage paints - I'm guessing someone with a wood furniture background "made the connection". I've seen some furniture makers use a DA to polish out a Urethane clear coats on wood table tops.

Thanks for the great article!

Mike Pennington
Aug 20th, 2010, 01:13 PM
I don't know, My guess would be one of the field guys... but it could have been anyone... Mike Pennington might know...


Great comments above Mike, but as you know....we must turn the clock back even further to see the true beginning of "DA Polishing"

It started before I began working here at Meguiar's (I started in 1989) :D

We developed a foam pad for polishing called the W6000 (notice the spindle on the backing plate)
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1645/W6000b.jpg

(Mike Phillips - I know you know this pad :D)

In the body shop arena, there were and still are pneumatic DA sanders. Not sure who at Meguiar's, but there was an idea that if we can attach a foam pad to that "sander" it would make it a "DA polisher".... The W6000 was born.

Back then, there were no "electric" DA polishers for consumers, only pneumatic sanders, so the "professionals" were really the only ones using the "DA polisher".

As Mike mentioned above, we partnered with Porter Cable and launched the G100 in 1995 and the rest is history...

WOW Time flies !!!

Mike Phillips
Aug 20th, 2010, 02:02 PM
We developed a foam pad for polishing called the W6000 (notice the spindle on the backing plate)
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1645/W6000b.jpg

(Mike Phillips - I know you know this pad :D)


Have one right here on my desk in the bag...





As Mike mentioned above, we partnered with Porter Cable and launched the G100 in 1995 and the rest is history...

WOW Time flies !!!

That means my catalog from 1995 is probably the oldest or original catalog with the introduction of the Porter Cable by Meguiar's to the paint polishing world... I'm so glad I've kept all my catalogs over the years...


I do remember calling on body shops and showing them the above pad for use with their air powered DA sanders and that was back in 1988 when I first started and you're right...

Time does fly...

Well it's Friday as I type... so everyone have a swirl-free weekend...

(stole that from a guy on the AG forum, thought it was funny)


:doublethumbsup2

J. A. Michaels
Aug 20th, 2010, 05:17 PM
Thanks for the follow up, both Mike's. I was just curious. I wonder if it was "tested" on old beater paint.

Ravi_1992
Aug 22nd, 2010, 11:01 PM
Great comments above Mike, but as you know....we must turn the clock back even further to see the true beginning of "DA Polishing"

It started before I began working here at Meguiar's (I started in 1989) :D

We developed a foam pad for polishing called the W6000 (notice the spindle on the backing plate)
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1645/W6000b.jpg

(Mike Phillips - I know you know this pad :D)

In the body shop arena, there were and still are pneumatic DA sanders. Not sure who at Meguiar's, but there was an idea that if we can attach a foam pad to that "sander" it would make it a "DA polisher".... The W6000 was born.

Back then, there were no "electric" DA polishers for consumers, only pneumatic sanders, so the "professionals" were really the only ones using the "DA polisher".

As Mike mentioned above, we partnered with Porter Cable and launched the G100 in 1995 and the rest is history...

WOW Time flies !!!


I bought one of these pads about a year ago when I got a cheap rotary, Ive noticed that the adhesive is starting to give in around the edges of the backing plate, is this common after a couple of washes?

I haven't washed it or used it much since I noticed it, I might get some super glue and start using it again.

Zeta Detail
Aug 23rd, 2010, 01:25 PM
Wow, don't you love this place? This is history of detailing being written.

Mike Pennington
Aug 23rd, 2010, 01:35 PM
I bought one of these pads about a year ago when I got a cheap rotary, Ive noticed that the adhesive is starting to give in around the edges of the backing plate, is this common after a couple of washes?

I haven't washed it or used it much since I noticed it, I might get some super glue and start using it again.

Sorry to hear that, but the pad listed above W6000, is for a D/A Polisher. You might be referring to the W1000 or W5500, which was basically the same foam, but designed for a rotary buffer.

If that is the case, unfortunately, those pads are not designed to be washed, so that is the main reason why they are giving up....

If you are looking for a pad(s) that can be washed, we would suggest our Soft Buff 2.0 Pads. (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=28714&highlight=Soft+Buff+2.0) They can be washed and used on a rotary or DA as long as you have the right backing plate.

Ravi_1992
Aug 23rd, 2010, 11:19 PM
Sorry to hear that, but the pad listed above W6000, is for a D/A Polisher. You might be referring to the W1000 or W5500, which was basically the same foam, but designed for a rotary buffer.

If that is the case, unfortunately, those pads are not designed to be washed, so that is the main reason why they are giving up....

If you are looking for a pad(s) that can be washed, we would sugges our Soft Buff 2.0 Pads. (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=28714&highlight=Soft+Buff+2.0) They can be washed and used on a rotary or DA as long as you have the right backing plate.


No worries at all Mike, its still very usable. Nothing a dab of super glue won't fix:D

jfelbab
Aug 24th, 2010, 01:52 PM
I know that the G100 was in earlier catalogs. I purchased my G100 from the winter 1994 catalog. I don't have the catalog any longer but I still use the G100 that I purchased in March of 1995 as part of the Concours collection. Note the date of the order and the note at the bottom referencing the 1994 catalog. This G100 has polished more cars than I can count and is still going strong. Best detailing purchase I ever made.

http://gallery.mac.com/jfelbab/100192/PICT7869/web.jpg

http://gallery.mac.com/jfelbab/100192/PICT7875/web.jpg

Ravi_1992
Aug 26th, 2010, 12:04 AM
I know that the G100 was in earlier catalogs. I purchased my G100 from the winter 1994 catalog. I don't have the catalog any longer but I still use the G100 that I purchased in March of 1995 as part of the Concours collection. Note the date of the order and the note at the bottom referencing the 1994 catalog. This G100 has polished more cars than I can count and is still going strong. Best detailing purchase I ever made.

http://gallery.mac.com/jfelbab/100192/PICT7869/web.jpg

http://gallery.mac.com/jfelbab/100192/PICT7875/web.jpg

:hijacked:laughing So the old G110 was just a PC with a meguiars logo on it ?

jfelbab
Aug 26th, 2010, 05:38 AM
The old G100 was a Porter-Cable 7336. The Meguiar's difference was that the G100 came with a lifetime replacement guarantee. I was skeptical of the reliability and so I kept the original packaging as I was sure it would not last, LOL. I've used the hell out of this G100 for 15+ years and it is like the Timex watch of polishers... it just keeps on ticking.

Mike Pennington
Aug 26th, 2010, 06:16 AM
So the old G110 was just a PC with a meguiars logo on it ?

Yes, our original dual action polisher launched in the early - mid 90's (G100) was a partnership between us and Porter Cable.