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Michael Stoops
Oct 1st, 2010, 01:04 PM
D/A Buffing 101 - An Introduction to the G110v2 (and similar) (https://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?45702-D-A-Buffing-101-An-Introduction-to-the-G110v2-(and-similar))

You finally decided that trying to maintain your car’s finish by hand was too much work and the results just weren’t up to what you really wanted, so you bought a G110v2 (or similar) buffer. But you still are not 100% sure just how to use it properly. Maybe you’re even a bit nervous about it still.

Or maybe you’re so nervous about using a power tool on your paint that you haven’t actually purchased one yet.

Either way, this article should answer most of your questions and give you the confidence to finally get out there and use the tool. Once you get started you’ll be pleasantly surprised at just how easy and effective the tool can be, and how great your paint can look with far less effort than doing everything by hand. So let’s get started.

First off, let’s get familiar with the tool itself and the pads and liquids you’ll likely be using with it. All of the major brand D/A buffers on the market today are very similar in appearance and use. Although the actual speeds may vary slightly, they all come with 6 variable speed settings adjusted by a small thumbwheel. Feel free to experiment with the following numbers a bit depending on how your paint is responding, but these are good starting points. For routine defect correction speed 5 is going to be your default setting. In some cases you may need to run the tool a bit faster or a bit slower, depending on how your paint responds. You'll also need to apply some pressure to the pad, but don't use so much pressure that you stop the pad from rotating though. How much pressure you need to use is, again, going to depend on the severity of the defects and how the paint reacts to the input. Sometimes a lot of pressure is needed, sometimes only light pressure works best. Applying waxes and sealants or even pure polishes will most often be done on speed 3 and with just light pressure. This is a much less variable process than the defect correction phase. At this point all you’re doing is spreading a thin layer of product onto the paint so from one vehicle to the next this step is almost always the same.

Pad choice is pretty straightforward. In the Meguiar’s line you’ll be using primarily the W8207 Soft Buff 2.0 yellow polishing pad for your defect correction when running the tool at speed 5. This pad is moderately aggressive, meaning it provides a bit of cut along with the liquid you’re using. This cut from the pad helps with the defect correction process. (For a more in depth explanation of this, please see “Let’s Talk About Total Cut” (http://www.meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=38239)) For application of waxes and sealants you’ll be using a W9207 Soft Buff 2.0 black finishing pad with the tool running at speed 3. You can feel how much softer this pad is than the W8207, which means it offers very little cut, if any, on its own. You want a soft pad like this when applying wax because at that point the paint should look virtually flawless – why use a pad with some level of cut at this point? You don’t want to risk marring the surface at all, so a soft finishing pad is the logical choice.

It is a good idea to use a separate pad for each liquid you’re using rather than mix liquids on a single pad. So if you find you need to use two different liquids that require a similar pad, like a finishing polish and a wax, just have a pad for each liquid available before you get started. Once you’re finished with the project and the pads have gone through the washer and dryer, you can use a different liquid on it during subsequent use. Just don’t go straight from one liquid to another while using the same pad.

Meguiar’s also makes a foam cutting pad, the W7207 Soft Buff 2.0 burgundy cutting pad. While we don’t recommend this pad for use on a D/A buffer like the G110v2, it can be used in a pinch if necessary. The potential downside to using this pad on this tool is that it is aggressive enough that, when coupled with the motion of the tool, some hazing of the paint is common. Yes, the extra aggressiveness can help to get through a stubborn area like a badly etched bird dropping, but for routine use the downside outweighs the upside. Use it only if you absolutely have to. The same can be said of running the tool on speed 6. Prolonged use of maximum speed puts a lot of stress on the hook & loop attachment system of the pad and backing plate. Due to the constantly changing direction of the pad, it is essentially trying to break free from the backing plate, and that generates a lot of friction and heat on the hook & loop system. We’ve seen many cases of pads from various manufacturers failing due to excessive, prolonged heat brought about by constantly running the tool at maximum speed. But again, for removal of a specific, stubborn defect, that extra speed can be a benefit for the short term. Just use it sparingly if you must.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2324.JPG

All right, with that out of the way, let’s get started. Gather up all the tools you’re going to need for your paint correction project – your buffer, pads, liquids, towels, masking tape, etc. We’re assuming at this point that the car has been washed and dried, and clayed if needed to remove the above surface bonded contaminants that make the paint feel rough to the touch. We still aren’t quite ready to put pad to paint though. You will want to tape off any textured vinyl and plastic or rubber trim to avoid staining them with your paint cleaner. Taping also prevents or minimizes having dried product accumulate in the edge of trim pieces, washer nozzles, head and tail light assemblies, etc. You generally don’t need to worry about damaging these pieces with a D/A buffer, but it’s much faster to tape them off before you start than to go back and clean everything up after you’re done. So tape off all the trim, washer nozzles, etc before you get started.


Taping off trim, washer nozzles, emblems, etc before buffing.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2327.JPG


http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2338.JPG


http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2354.JPG


When working on any car for the first time it’s always smart to do a test spot first. Depending on how severe the defects are you might start with a very light cleaner such as SwirlX, or for very heavy defects you may want to start with Ultimate Compound. What you don’t know just by looking at the paint is how hard or “workable” that paint is. Some paint systems, even when pretty badly marred, are so workable that even a mild paint cleaner is sufficient to fully correct the defects. Other paints are just the opposite, and even minor defects require a fairly aggressive product in order to remove them. But you can’t know for sure which one you’re dealing with until you actually get to work. Sure, you may read online about a specific make and model having very hard or very soft paint, but you can’t assume that to be the case 100% of the time. There are always exceptions. Again, this information found online can be a guide, a starting point, but that’s really all it is. 50 people may have posted that their C6 Corvette has incredibly hard paint and that you need a very aggressive liquid/pad combination at a very high speed and a lot of pressure in order to remove even minor defects. But when working on your C6 Corvette you discover that you’re able to remove defects quite easily with only moderately aggressive products. That doesn’t mean those 50 people are wrong, or that you’re a better detailer than they are. It just means that your car’s paint is not terribly hard or difficult to correct. We use the C6 as an example here because it is indeed notorious for having incredibly hard paint, yet at a recent Saturday Class we were able to remove a year old bird dropping etch mark using just Ultimate Compound and a W8207 Soft Buff 2.0 polishing pad with a G110v2 running on speed 5. Hardly a super aggressive combination. Just keep in mind that nothing is written in stone in this game – every situation is unique.


Test spot laid out and ready to go.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2362.JPG

For our purposes we’re going to tape off an area of the hood on this car and apply some SwirlX with a polishing pad. We’ve already set the tool to speed 5 and will simply apply an “X” of product to the face of a clean pad, place the pad firmly onto the paint to avoid splatter, and turn the tool on.

The initial application of product on pad.
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2366.JPG

Initially you should just quickly spread out the product over your test area, using only moderate pressure. This distributes a film of product over the work area. Just a quick pass is all it takes, then slow down, apply some pressure to the pad, and move the tool slowly over the work area in overlapping strokes. Pay attention to the work area and make smooth, methodical movements from one side to the other, overlapping your strokes by 50%. Keep the pad flat, keep the pressure constant, and pay attention to what’s going on. Relax. The tool is not going to fight you or run off on its own. Too often we see first time users hold the tool in a death grip. Relax. You control the tool, not the other way around. Keep your pressure directly over the pad, not down by the end of the handle near the cord. Doing that will cause the pad to lift up on one side, and it will stop rotating. You want some rotation all the time.

Spreading product quickly over work area, distributing it throughout the area.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2382.JPG


Continue working the product in these overlapping passes until it becomes just a very thin film on the surface. Don’t allow the product to dry out, however, as dry buffing usually leads to marring of the surface due to loss of lubricity. You can usually see that the product is still wet, or you can quickly run your finger through the film immediately following the pad. If it’s getting dry it’s time to stop. If it’s almost gone, it’s time to stop.


Move the tool slowly over the paint, applying moderate pressure.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2394.JPG


A quick swipe with your finger shows the product is still wet - never dry buff!

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2399.JPG



Product is thin now, but it's still wet.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2402.JPG



Wipe off before product dries.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2412.JPG



Once you’ve finished this initial pass of your test spot, take a few minutes to evaluate your progress. Pull the vehicle back into direct sunlight if you need to in order to properly view any remaining defects.

Now it’s decision time. Compare the area you just worked on (your test spot) to the adjacent, untreated area. Are all of the defects completely gone? Probably not, and that’s fine. There are a lot of different possibilities that could be at play here:



If a single session with a given liquid and pad was able to noticeably reduce the level of defects, then you’re on the right track.

If it removed the majority of the defects then a second pass should finish off the remnants.
If it removed almost everything, then maybe a single pass of longer duration and/or with a bit more pressure would do the trick.


If a single session with a given liquid and pad only removed a small amount of the defects, then you may need to rethink some things.

Go back over the area and try using more pressure, or work the area longer (assuming the product is still wet after a longer buffing cycle), or a combination of the two
If two or three passes are still leaving most of the defects behind, and your technique is correct, then you probably need a more aggressive liquid


If a single session with a given liquid and pad looks like it didn’t do a darn thing, and you used proper technique (pressure, speed, time) then you can safely assume you need a more aggressive liquid. It does NOT, however, mean that you need to now grab the most aggressive thing you can find!
There is another possibility, and this one can be a bit tricky. If the original defects are mostly, or completely, gone but the paint looks very hazy – or – if suddenly the paint looks much worse than before you started, you’ve probably got very delicate paint that needs a much less aggressive process than what you started with. For new users this can be a tricky thing to diagnose. Have a look at The Challenge of Delicate Paint (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=44344) for more info


Remember that at this point you are ultimately trying to determine the best process to fully remove the most serious defects in your paint. You are not necessarily going to go from a cobwebbed, swirled mess to total perfection in a single step. You may need a follow up finishing polish if your first step required a pretty aggressive approach and your paint responded by hazing slightly. This haze is pretty common, especially with a D/A buffing process, but it is also usually very easy to remove. The paint is going to play a huge role in this, and just because you’ve read somewhere that such and such a process gave “perfect” results on one car does not mean it will return identical results on yours.

With the above information you now have a game plan for the entire vehicle. Maybe that game plan is a single long pass with lots of pressure; or a single short pass; maybe two passes with moderate pressure; maybe an initial pass with a more aggressive liquid and a follow up with a finishing liquid to remove the resulting haze. Now it really is a simple matter of repeating that process over the entire vehicle. If you need to use two different liquids to accomplish the task, then use the more aggressive one first for the whole car (working in small areas at a time, of course) and then move to the finishing liquid.




Scottwax4 Scottwax2




There are a few other things to keep in mind as you work your way around the vehicle:


Experiment with pressure on the pad. Using only the weight of the tool is usually not sufficient to correct defects. Pressure and time can help, especially with very severe defects or very hard paint.

This is how the pad looks with just the weight of the tool, and it is usually insufficient for defect removal.
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2448.JPG

This is a heavily compressed pad - you may or may not need this much pressure depending on the above mentioned variables.http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2450.JPG



Keep your work area small, usually no larger than the size of a microfiber towel. Sometimes you may find that you need to work smaller than this even, perhaps half the size of a towel. Remember, you're leveling paint here so you need to concentrate your energy in a workable space.

Work area should be no larger than your microfiber towel.
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2445.JPG


Apply pressure directly over the pad, not down toward the base of the tool near the power cord. If you start to come up on the edge of the pad the tool will stop spinning (it will continue to oscillate, however) and you want that spinning action, even if it's slow.
If the vehicle has curved body panels you will experience areas where you simply can not keep the entire pad flat on the surface. In those cases, roll the tool with the curve of the body panel so as to keep the center line of the pad against the paint, rather than an edge. This way the pad will continue rotate even though it's making less overall contact with the paint.

Keep the pad flat against the paint!
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2460.JPG

Do your best to avoid moving off a curved panel like this; This is bad form.
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2469.JPG

Roll with it - follow the panel curves rather than moving off onto the edge of the pad.
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/rollwithit.gif



Generally speaking, when working with a D/A polisher it's OK to overlap from one panel to the next. That's part of what makes this tool so much safer than a rotary. Of course, you may end up with some product getting down in the seams but if you only do this when the product has been worked a bit that shouldn't be a problem.
Be aware, however, that if you're working on an older car with original paint then the paint could be very thin on these edges. While we don't see it very often, it is possible to cause a problem here. But on otherwise healthy paint on a newer vehicle, it should pose no problem at all.

Overlapping panels.
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2516.JPG



When you first apply product to the pad you want to make sure the pad is firmly against the paint before you switch it on so as not to splatter product everywhere. But when you've reached the end of your buffing cycle go ahead and lift the pad off the paint as you're turning the tool off. There shouldn't be any heavy product left to splatter, but if you keep the tool firmly against the paint when you turn the tool off you'll get a thick blob of product that can be difficult to wipe off.

Avoid this by lifting the pad off the paint as you switch it off.
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2541.JPG



As you work around the vehicle and you continue to add product to the pad, some of it is going to be absorbed into the pad. Some of it will also begin to dry on the outer edges of the pad. Both situations can cause a reduction in the effectiveness of the entire process so you need to clean your pad on the fly regularly. A brush will only remove dried surface material, so do the following after every panel:

With the tool switched off, press a clean terry cloth towel against the pad while it's still mounted on the tool
Press the towel firmly against the pad and switch the tool on
Keep the towel and pad firmly pressed together for a few seconds, then switch the tool off
The excess product accumulated in the pad is forced out the front of the pad and absorbed by the towel.


Even when doing this cleaning on the fly regularly, it is still a good idea to switch to a completely fresh pad at least a couple of times when doing a full correction on any vehicle.

Clean your pads often during a paint correction project.
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2573.JPG

Excess product is forced out of the pad and onto the towel.
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2584.JPG



Working on small, narrow or tight areas can sometimes be an issue with a full sized pad, but there is an option. Sure, you could work some areas by hand, but using the 4" version of our Soft Buff 2.0 pads (and an S3BP 3" backing plate, of course) can make some of those jobs easier.

Use these pads exactly as you would the full sized pads - yellow polishing pad for paint correction, black finishing pad for applying pure polishes and waxes.
Something very important to consider, however, when using these smaller pads - you are concentrating all the energy of the buffer into a very small space, so you can begin to generate some serious heat. Check your work often as you go. If the paint feels hot, back off. This is especially true when working on urethane bumper covers as this substrate does not dissipate heat as efficiently as steel or aluminum. Be careful!!



4" Soft Buff 2.0 pads are used just like the full sized pads.
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2748.JPG

Great on A-pillars!
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2818.JPG

Perfect for bumpers!
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2754.JPG

Be sure to check often for unwanted heat buildup!!
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2779.JPG




Scottwax4 Scottwax2



OK, now you should have fully corrected the paint throughout the vehicle - or at least to your satisfaction - so it's time to move on to the next steps.

If you found the whole defect correction process was a good bit of work, that means you probably did it exactly right! The next two steps are much, much less involved and should go pretty quickly for you. And the G110v2 makes them even easier.

Next, as an optional step, is the application of a pure polish such as M07 Show Car Glaze or Deep Crystal Polish. You might even want to use something like M205 instead to further refine the finish - it's all up to you and what your expectations are.

Since you're done with the defect correction process you can replace your W8207 polishing pad with a W9207 finishing pad and drop the speed of the tool down to 3. When applying a pure polish you still want to work in those small areas, although you can probably expand the size just a bit. Again, apply a small amount of product to the pad, gently work it against the paint and wipe off while still wet. Remember, you are no longer correcting defects here so you don't need to be aggressive at all.

Small amount of product.
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2600.JPG

Work it in for a couple of minutes or until it looks very thin on the surface.
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2612.JPG

Wipe off before it dries.
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2623.JPG

If you choose to use M205 rather than a pure polish your application process is going to be a bit different:


Stay with the W9207 finishing pad
Stay with speed 3 to start but feel free to experiment a bit with other speeds
Stay with the small to slightly larger work areas
Increase pressure a bit - not as much as you used during the defect correction stage, but a bit more than the light pressure you'd use with a pure polish
M205 has a light cutting action but it can add a lot of clarity to the finish. If you experienced some hazing from your defect correction process, this is the perfect product to remove that haze and greatly refine the finish.
Remember to wipe off before it dries!


At this point the paint should be looking better than it probably ever has - even better than the day the vehicle left the dealership! And you haven't even waxed it yet. The G110v2 is the perfect way to quickly apply a very thin and uniform coat of your favorite wax.

Using a fresh finishing pad (not the same one you used for the polish above) and keep the tool set to speed 3. Start out by applying a small amount of liquid wax to the pad and then working it lightly against the paint. We are now going to deviate from our earlier routine in a few ways:


You can move the tool much more quickly over the paint than you did for the processes above. Don't go crazy here, but definitely pick up the pace.
Keep light to moderate pressure on the pad, and keep the pad flat to the paint
Cover all the painted surfaces of the vehicle now, do NOT wipe off each section as you go.
Let the wax dry fully before wiping off. Cover all the painted surfaces and then wait another 15 to 20 minutes before wiping off.

Initial product application is similar to earlier steps.
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2637.JPG

Quickly spread it over a large area.
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2643.JPG

Continue adding fresh product as you go, but ease up on the amount you use. Remember, you want a very thin and uniform coat, that's all. You should be able to cover an entire full sized car with just an ounce or less of product. Don't let your pad become saturated with wax. When you're about half done with the car, after having added wax just a couple of times, you can actually squeeze the excess wax out of the pad and continue working with it.

This pad doesn't look too loaded up, does it?
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2688.JPG

But even at this point we can squeeze product back out of it by pressing it against the paint with the tool switched off.
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2693.JPG

This might not look like much, but it was enough to cover the entire rear hatch of this car!
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2696.JPG

Yes, what you see on the hatch is from spreading out the blob above - we added nothing more to the pad!
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2700.JPG

Now we add just a few more drops of wax and finished the entire side of the car.
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2721.JPG

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2735.JPG

This is the final coat of wax drying on the car. After 15 to 20 minutes wipeoff is incredibly simple!
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2684.JPG


At this point all that's left to do is clean up your garage, pull the masking tape off the trim and emblems, and then wipe off the dried wax with a clean microfiber towel.

The whole process really is that easy and safe. The most important thing you can do is to take your time. Rushing through the process leads to mistakes and incomplete removal of the defects. It is faster overall to be methodical and careful than to hustle your way through, only to have to go back and correct mistakes. Selecting a very aggressive product won't always get you a faster result. If it's too aggressive for the paint you'll have to go back and do your correction step a second time to correct the defects you put in the paint. If a less aggressive product gets rid of the defects without causing other issues, then that is a far better choice. Of course, sometimes you're faced with very severe defects and/or very hard paint. In that case, you may have no choice but to use a couple of steps to achieve a show car shine, but at least with a proper test spot you'll know that going in.

Again, this is just an introduction to using the G110v2 or other, similar D/A polishers. There are all kinds of little tips and tricks that can be found all over this forum and others. Now that you know how to use the tool properly to begin with, you can better apply those tips when needed, or as you develop and advance your own skills with this tool. Remember, all of the above is really just a starting point. There are so many variables when it comes to polishing paint that we can't address them all in a single article. But of all the tools available to you when polishing paint, the single greatest is your brain. Use it. Observe, pay attention, think. And above all, take your time.

Sean Conrad
Oct 1st, 2010, 03:21 PM
Great info!!! Thanks for all the great tips and help.

bene vita
Oct 1st, 2010, 03:43 PM
Mike - Great article - and great car for the demo.

See you in a couple of weeks.

Harry

Shawn T.
Oct 1st, 2010, 04:00 PM
Great article! Very informative even for someone not new to DA polishing.

Tuck91
Oct 1st, 2010, 04:07 PM
Great writeup Mike.

All I could think of during the writeup was how well your PT Cruiser has to look in full sun, I know that flake pops in the sun!

FRS
Oct 2nd, 2010, 01:45 AM
This writeup will make a lot of readers buy the DA .. and they should.

I myself was an elbow-grease guy, but ... hey, everything is much easier with this tool.

So yes, just buy it, without hesitation!!!

EPHIOS
Oct 2nd, 2010, 06:27 AM
Great write up! My wife have the same car 2009 Chrysler PT Cruiser, and gave alot more info to work with.

gto_don
Oct 2nd, 2010, 06:32 AM
Thanks for the great write up Mike and the time to pull it all together. Very informative and helpful. :xyxthumbs

Peter_Klim
Oct 2nd, 2010, 08:30 AM
trying to delete this post before it is read but no option to delete is found...

Peter_Klim
Oct 2nd, 2010, 08:41 AM
This thread is AWESOME!!

I received by DAP a couple of weeks back but wanted to keep researching on hw to use it first. This thread makes me save a lot of time researching!

One thing I had no idea was that there was black pad available. When I ordered the DAP, I tried to make sure I also ordered all the ccessories. I'm glad I read this before using.

I truly appreciate you putting the time in writing up this instructional/guidline Michael!!

Is there a thread somewhere that steps you through all the necessary stages of washing/correcting/waxing? I'm not talking about full detail, but something that tells you the order of doing it and what products can be used for each step and the strength of the products listed in order.
Example: (and i'm just making up the

Step 1. Wash car with car shampoo.

Step 2. Use Clay bar
Strength from weakest to strongest:
1. Clay bar A
2. Clay bar b

Step 3. Correct Paint Defects:
Strength from weakest to strongest:
1. M105
2. Swrill-X
3. product XYZ
4. M205
Pads:
1. Burgendy #XYZ
2. Yellow
3. Black

Step 4. Car Wax (sealent or whatever we are doing now, I don't know the correct term)
Strength from weakest to strongest:
1.product a
2. product b


Again, thank you SOOOOOOOOOO MUCH for this thread!!!!!!!!!!

Batmobile
Oct 2nd, 2010, 08:59 AM
Great Information!! Thank you for sharing.. How about Rotary? I can't wait to see it too....

smack
Oct 2nd, 2010, 11:43 AM
Wow Mike! What an informative write up. I will have to re read it when I have more time.

EPHIOS
Oct 2nd, 2010, 02:15 PM
So, Michael, is it OK to use masking tape (beige-colored) on taping up the trims and emblems? I am trying the paint's tape, and it is not just sticking for me. Thanks!

Kevin Brown
Oct 2nd, 2010, 03:10 PM
EPIC write-up, my man. :read1

A 2010 version of information from the past, with some much needed new information for all MOL Members to ponder.

Another fantastic write-up...

Brought to us by the man known in the inner circle simply as :woot1"STOoooOPS!!":woot1


Killer work. :patriot

ClearlyCoated
Oct 2nd, 2010, 05:37 PM
Awesome writeup, Mike! Already bookmarked this thread as a definitive reference source. Having seen your PT up close at past TNOG's, your finish is everything my Accord aspires to be. :xyxthumbs

Big Ed5150
Oct 2nd, 2010, 05:59 PM
Great write up...i think mike did this cause he knew i just bought a g110v2..lol.

mattya802
Oct 4th, 2010, 05:50 AM
Awesome write up Mike! Just bought my PC and used it for the first time yesterday. Certainly have a lot of learning/practice to do with this thing!

Michael Stoops
Oct 4th, 2010, 08:19 AM
Is there a thread somewhere that steps you through all the necessary stages of washing/correcting/waxing? I'm not talking about full detail, but something that tells you the order of doing it and what products can be used for each step and the strength of the products listed in order.


That would be our 5 Step Paint Care Cycle. (http://www.meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=37320)



Great Information!! Thank you for sharing.. How about Rotary? I can't wait to see it too....

Maybe in time, but that's not as easy to do via just images and words. There is a whole lot more going on with a rotary compared to a D/A, and much more potential for damage in the hands of a novice.


So, Michael, is it OK to use masking tape (beige-colored) on taping up the trims and emblems? I am trying the paint's tape, and it is not just sticking for me. Thanks!

The tape used here is Meguiar's Professional Masking Tape (http://www.meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=38457) rather than typical blue painter's tape. We developed this tape specifically for detailing - it's less expensive than the painter's tape and holds onto trim better due to the adhesive being a bit more tenacious. Painter's tape was developed with very specific painting requirements in mind - light adhesion so as not to damage fresh paint, ability to leave a very clean paint edge line, etc - that are sort of overkill when used for detailing.



Great write up...i think mike did this cause he knew i just bought a g110v2..lol.
Just for you Big Ed, but thanks for letting others read it too!!! :read1

Bill Davidson
Oct 4th, 2010, 08:43 AM
Excellent write-up Mike. You were able to articulate in writing, what is often difficult to get across even with video. This article should ship as instructions with the G110v2.

Mike Phillips
Oct 4th, 2010, 10:17 AM
Excellent write-up Mike, this is going to help a lot of people new to machine polishing into the future...

If you don't mind, I would like to add a link to a similar article that brings up the most common problems and then the solutions as it relates to DA Polishers... it might help people to take what you've laid out and if needed tweak their technique and master the DA Polisher...


Tips & Techniques for using the G110v2, G110, G100, G220 and the PC Dual Action Polisher (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=20874)
(These are all similar tools)

After teaching hundreds of classes here at Meguiar's, there are some common mistakes most people make when trying to remove swirls and scratches with a dual action polisher. Most of them have to do with technique.





Here's a list of the most common problems
Trying to work too large of an area at one time.
Move the polisher too fast over the surface.
Too low of speed setting for removing swirls.
Too little pressure on the head of the unit.
Too much pressure on the head of the unit so the pad quits rotating.
Not keeping the pad flat while working your product.
Too much product, too little product.
Not cleaning the pad often enough.
Here's a list of the solutions in matching order,
Shrink your work area down, the harder the paint the smaller the area you can work. The average area should be and average of about 16" by 16" up to 20" by 20" or so. You have to do some experimenting, (called a Test Spot), to find out how easy or how hard the defects are coming out of your car's paint system and then adjust your work area to the results of your Test Spot.
For removing defects out of the paint you want to use what we call a Slow Arm Speed. It's really easy to move the polisher too quickly because the sound of the motor spinning fast has a psychological effect to for some reason want to make people move the polisher fast. Also the way most people think is that, "If I move the polisher quickly, I'll get done faster", but it doesn't work that way.
When first starting out many people are scared of burning or swirling their paint, so they take the safe route of running the polisher at too low of a speed setting, again... this won't work. The action of the polisher is already g-e-n-t-l-e, you need the speed and specifically the pad rotating over the paint as well as the combination of time, (slow arm speed), together with the diminishing abrasives, the foam type, and the pressure to remove small particles of paint which is how your remove below surface defects like swirls or scratches. It's a leveling process that's somewhat difficult because the tool is safe/gentle while in most cases, modern clear coat paints are harder than traditional single stage paints and this makes them hard to work on. This is also why people get frustrated, they don't understand paint technology, all they know is their paint swirls easy and getting the swirls out is difficult and thus frustrating.
For the same reason as stated in #3, people are scared, or perhaps a better word is apprehensive, to apply too much pressure and the result of too little pressure is no paint is removed thus no swirls are removed.
Just the opposite of item #4, people think that by pushing harder on the polisher they can work faster and be more aggressive, but the truth is the clutch in the tool is a safety mechanism to prevent burning and will cause the pad to stop rotating, thus less cleaning or abrading action and once in a while this will lead a person to then post on the forum something like this, "Hey my pad doesn't rotate". There needs to be a balance of enough pressure to remove defects and keep the pad rotating but yet not too much pressure as to stop the rotating action. This balance is affected by a lot of things, things like type of chemical, some chemicals provide more lubrication and the pad will spin easier, curved surfaces or any raise in body lines will tend to stop the pad from rotating. This is where experience on how to address these areas comes into play or you do the best you can and move on. It's not a perfect tool, nor a perfect system, but it's almost always better than working/cleaning by hand.
Applying pressure in such a way as to put too much pressure to one side of the pad will cause it to stop rotating and thus decrease cleaning ability.
Too much product over lubricates the surface and this won't allow the diminishing abrasives to do their job plus it will increase the potential for messy splatter as well as cause pad saturation. Too little product will keep the pad from rotating due to no lubrication and there won't be enough diminishing abrasives to do any work. Again it's a balance that comes with experience, or another way of saying this would be it's a balance that comes with hours of buffing out a car to learn what to do and what not to do. Information like what you're reading here is just an edge to decrease your learning curve. Hope this is helping.
Most people don't clean their pad often enough and most of the time the reason for this is because they don't know they're supposed to clean their pad often and they don't know how to clean their pad. Again, that's why this forum is here to help you with both of these things. You should clean your pad after every application of product or every other application of product, your choice, most of the time cleaning your pad after every other application of product works pretty well. It enables you to work clean and enables the foam pad, the polisher and the next application of fresh product too all work effectively. How to clean your pad will be addressed below sooner versus later, but not at the time of this posting. (Sorry, I'm behind a keyboard, not a video camera
The first 4 are the most common.


:)

Marc08EX
Oct 4th, 2010, 12:04 PM
Thanks for taking time to do a how-to write up! This will be great information for people who's new to detailing and want to learn the proper way of doing things!

Jim Lucier
Oct 9th, 2010, 07:10 PM
Finally took the plunge and ordered the G110v2 (the Power Kit). Received it yesterday and spent the entire day today (Saturday) polishing my red 2007 Subruban with M205/Yellow 2.0 pad after washing with Gold Class shampoo and a quick clean up with mild Meguiars clay/Final Inspection. Why had I waited so long? Meguiars DA polisher is the easiest tool to master. With the M205 I was able to remove all swirls and minor scratches with ease leaving a flawless, clean, and defect free surface. I used Final Inspection to prime the pad and and old bath towel to frequently clean the pad. A follow up applicaion of wax finished a long 10 hour day. The end result is a deep, dark finish that is better than new.
THANK YOU MEGUIARS FOR PRODUCING A SUPERIOR LINE OF PRODUCTS FOR THE AVERAGE WEEKEND WARRIOR TO EASILY MASTER.

Bunky
Oct 10th, 2010, 03:29 AM
Still learning but I have made most of the mistakes

Move the polisher too fast over the surface - this can happen after doing multiple panels (like 1/3 done), getting tired/bored, and trying to get done. Resist the urge, take a break, pay attention. Flex will make you stay attentive more than the droning DA.
Trying to work too large of an area at one time. I started using a mf towel as a template for area and mark off sections with painters tape. For my flex, I work about 20x20.
Too low of speed setting for removing swirls - If you are running at less than 5 to 6 you are wasting your time.
Too little pressure on the head of the unit - Only had this initially since I was scared of ruining the paint.It still needs plenty of pressure to break down. Once I played with the DA pad against my hand, I realized how safe it was.
Too much pressure on the head of the unit so the pad quits rotating - never had this issue.
Not keeping the pad flat while working your product - done this. Need to keep the Flex flat or it will walk more
Too much product, too little product - I try to use less and if it does not spread well, then add more. If you add too much (like with Menz. it takes forever to break it all down if you use too much).
Not cleaning the pad often enough - underrated issue to me. Polishes breakdown correctly (after each panel does not see to too much but at least after every couple panels). The tell tale sign is that when you spread the polish on a panel, if it does not look very uniform, you pad is likely dirty.

VMP
Oct 13th, 2010, 12:11 AM
Great write up, very good information, thanks Mike.

MagicHands
Nov 5th, 2010, 12:08 AM
Great Article Mike.

juliom2
Nov 15th, 2010, 06:42 AM
awesome!!!!!!

RyanNowlin
Nov 15th, 2010, 05:51 PM
Received my D/A in the mail on Thursday and spent Saturday morning with it and a bottle of Ultimate Compound. Absolutely amazing results, I still can't believe it! I focused on the front-end of my '07 911 Turbo and the swirls are now completely gone. Planning to do the rest of the car this coming weekend and then polish & wax.

Question - I clayed the car the previous weekend, then just washed and started the UC process this week. Is it OK to continue in this fashion week to week, assuming I can't get all the steps done in a single weekend? Or is it best to just dedicate 1 weekend to all the steps and do them back-to-back?

Also - was surprised when I started using the D/A with all the little yellow "crumbs" that came off the 2.0 pad and were getting everywhere, is this normal? Don't recall seeing this on any of the videos.

Thanks!
Ryan

Michael Stoops
Nov 16th, 2010, 08:40 AM
Hi Ryan, and welcome to MOL!


Received my D/A in the mail on Thursday and spent Saturday morning with it and a bottle of Ultimate Compound. Absolutely amazing results, I still can't believe it! I focused on the front-end of my '07 911 Turbo and the swirls are now completely gone. Planning to do the rest of the car this coming weekend and then polish & wax. Glad to see you're getting such good results so quickly!!


Question - I clayed the car the previous weekend, then just washed and started the UC process this week. Is it OK to continue in this fashion week to week, assuming I can't get all the steps done in a single weekend? Or is it best to just dedicate 1 weekend to all the steps and do them back-to-back?
Really the best case scenario would be to do the whole process start to finish in a single day or weekend. But time constraints don't always allow for that, so it you have to break it up over multiple weekends then so be it. But if you're going to do that, we'd recommend blocking out time to do the whole process on as much surface area as time allows. That is, if you're going to do the hood and front fenders only, then do the entire process on those areas and then next weekend do the entire process on one side of the car (time allowing, of course).

If the car is driven daily during this process we highly recommend washing and drying it thoroughly before starting each weekend session. You should be able to wash and clay the whole car, as you did, and then just concentrate on the buffing later on. Just keep in mind that doing so means you'll have no wax on some parts of the car, but in reality doing so for a week or two isn't going to cause the paint to fall off the car. If the car is not driven daily but is kept in a garage, you should then be fine just wiping it down with Quik Detailer prior to buffing the next section(s).

But from the above description, you start to see why doing the whole car in a single session or single weekend is preferred.


Also - was surprised when I started using the D/A with all the little yellow "crumbs" that came off the 2.0 pad and were getting everywhere, is this normal? Don't recall seeing this on any of the videos. That's normal and it's just part of the manufacturing process with the pads. In future you could wash the pads before first use, or at least brush them out thoroughly first, but other than that initial dust it's not a big deal.

RyanNowlin
Nov 20th, 2010, 11:08 AM
That is great, Michael -- thanks so much for the help!

Jimmy Buffit
Jan 14th, 2011, 09:30 AM
We've been using a DA for over 8 years, and almost exclusively with the intro of 105/205.

But, I've had each of my employees study this post (on the clock), and then quizzed them on the finer points.

As Kevin Brown pointed out, an epic post. Thanks for the symposium, Mike!

juliom2
Feb 14th, 2011, 10:07 AM
Shine with LoVe this Valentines!!!!!

mongo
Mar 7th, 2011, 08:29 AM
Great post indeed. Scottwax2

Anthony_G
Mar 12th, 2011, 06:22 PM
Next paycheck i'm buying the D/A tool!

Davy27
Mar 29th, 2011, 10:16 AM
Great writeup! New to the detailing world and this thread was exactly what i needed to make my decision on a DA and how to correctly use it!

Davy27
Mar 29th, 2011, 11:47 AM
wow, looks like it is out of stock everywhere! :(

FlameOut
Mar 31st, 2011, 03:08 PM
wow, looks like it is out of stock everywhere! :(

Yeah, I've been looking to pick one up also, but none to be found :scratchhead1

raggedrebel92
Mar 31st, 2011, 06:44 PM
Yeah, I've been looking to pick one up also, but none to be found :scratchhead1


Oh yeah, there gone everywhere. I found 1 on ebay. ONE. and its was $255. Thats alot. Theres a mailing list on ADS and they say it should be back in stock late March / early April. So well see what happens.

http://www.autodetailingsolutions.net/meguiars-g110-v2-preorder.html

leadebellis
Apr 6th, 2011, 08:01 AM
Nice im From Argentina i link meguiars :)

Davy27
Apr 6th, 2011, 04:04 PM
im guessing the availability got pushed back to the 22nd of April :(.

deej0121
May 20th, 2011, 07:00 PM
I am noobie to this forum & to detailing. Great post. Very informative. Especially the perspective about the "correction" being the most labor intensive. I have a 2000 Honda Civic that was badly oxidized. Even with only a cheap little orbital I bought at Wal Mart and a good bit of elbow grease, I have made a tremendous difference in the look of this car. I used UC, UP, then NXT wax. The car looks totally amazing. There remain some spots that need tmore work. I plan to buy a Meguiars or similar D/A to help me "cut" & really correct.

DragoneFire
May 28th, 2011, 07:19 PM
I have tried using scratch x, ultimate compound, tried little pressure, lots of pressure and still no luck, except that area around looks outstanding. Would what a step down from scratch x be are a more aggresive compound before i try wet sanding. thanks for any help

OzPapaSmurf
Jun 4th, 2011, 04:19 AM
Thank you for all the tips, VERY useful. Scottwax2

STRIFE
Jun 4th, 2011, 08:49 AM
Thx for the write up!! Great info!!
cannot wait to get a D/A buffer!!

Michael Stoops
Jun 6th, 2011, 09:01 AM
I have tried using scratch x, ultimate compound, tried little pressure, lots of pressure and still no luck, except that area around looks outstanding. Would what a step down from scratch x be are a more aggresive compound before i try wet sanding. thanks for any help

What are you working on and what are you trying to correct? Do you have an isolated scratch that is so deep you can feel it with your fingernail?

goldenlight
Jun 14th, 2011, 04:09 PM
This write up answered all my questions regarding the Dual Action Buffer. Thanks So much :worship

Rivman
Jun 25th, 2011, 07:34 AM
As an 'elbow grease' guy, I am seriously considering going 'power' for my car, and this article puts to rest any apprehension about sorting out what to use, where, and when. My biggest fear is damaging my 20+ year old base/clear finish that has been regularily maintained with Meguair's products. Guess the best way to make the switch is to pull the trigger on a DA buffer, and test fly it !! :nervous1
Thanks for a great step by step tutorial. :xyxthumbs

BillE
Jun 26th, 2011, 03:48 AM
As an 'elbow grease' guy, I am seriously considering going 'power' for my car, and this article puts to rest any apprehension about sorting out what to use, where, and when. My biggest fear is damaging my 20+ year old base/clear finish that has been regularily maintained with Meguair's products. Guess the best way to make the switch is to pull the trigger on a DA buffer, and test fly it !! :nervous1
Thanks for a great step by step tutorial. :xyxthumbs

You'll love it!

Just remember...least agressive product/method first. In other words, start gentle. Scottwax2

Bill

lakesiderider
Jun 27th, 2011, 07:20 PM
great info! im looking to buy the meguairs da buffer and am still a tad confused with how the pads connect. i have a dewalt rotary buffer that i bought a velcro backing plate for...my question is how do the pads attach to the buffer. also, what size pads work with the backing plate..i am going to keep it simple with pad selection and go with the 6 inch and 3 inch da microfiber pads.....what backing plate do i use for the 3 inch microfiber da pads?

Michael Stoops
Jun 28th, 2011, 08:03 AM
great info! im looking to buy the meguairs da buffer and am still a tad confused with how the pads connect. i have a dewalt rotary buffer that i bought a velcro backing plate for...my question is how do the pads attach to the buffer. also, what size pads work with the backing plate..i am going to keep it simple with pad selection and go with the 6 inch and 3 inch da microfiber pads.....what backing plate do i use for the 3 inch microfiber da pads?

All the major DA tools on the market use a hook & loop (velcro) attachment system for mounting the pads to the backing plate, so it's the same as with your rotary. The backing plates for the DA are different than those on the rotary as rotary backing plates thread onto the 5/8" threaded stud on the tool while DA backing plates have a 5/16" threaded stud that threads into the tool.

If you're going to use our Soft Buff 2.0 7" foam pads then you want our W68DA backing plate. The W68DA plate ships with our G110v2 buffer, by the way. If you're going to use our DA Microfiber Correction System then you want our W67DA backing plate for the 5.5" microfiber discs and our S3BP plate for the 3" discs.

lakesiderider
Jun 29th, 2011, 05:47 PM
All the major DA tools on the market use a hook & loop (velcro) attachment system for mounting the pads to the backing plate, so it's the same as with your rotary. The backing plates for the DA are different than those on the rotary as rotary backing plates thread onto the 5/8" threaded stud on the tool while DA backing plates have a 5/16" threaded stud that threads into the tool.

If you're going to use our Soft Buff 2.0 7" foam pads then you want our W68DA backing plate. The W68DA plate ships with our G110v2 buffer, by the way. If you're going to use our DA Microfiber Correction System then you want our W67DA backing plate for the 5.5" microfiber discs and our S3BP plate for the 3" discs.

thanks for clarification...got my order complete now

coredump
Jul 25th, 2011, 12:32 AM
Back in 2005, I took a Meguiar's seminar with Mike Phillips on how to use a G100, W8006, M80, etc... Mike Phillips had a thread on how to use the G100 (speed settings, pressure). I can't seem to find that thread anymore (trying to find it for reference on what polish, pads, speed settings, pounds of pressure). Has that thread been depreciated into this?

I've been lazy with my car's paint and it's time to get it clayed, polished, waxed once again.

coredump
Jul 25th, 2011, 12:36 AM
Back in 2005, I took a Meguiar's seminar with Mike Phillips on how to use a G100, W8006, M80, etc... Mike Phillips had a thread on how to use the G100 (speed settings, pressure). I can't seem to find that thread anymore (trying to find it for reference on what polish, pads, speed settings, pounds of pressure). Has that thread been depreciated into this?

I've been lazy with my car's paint and it's time to get it clayed, polished, waxed once again.

I found it!

http://www.meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?7034-Using-the-G-100-to-remove-swirls-scratches-and-etchings...

Anyways, should I be using

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1662/DA_intro_2324.JPG

Instead of M80, W8006, etc...?

Slidder
Sep 24th, 2012, 07:07 PM
Mike: I'm new to this forum and also new to all of Mequiar's products. Have to say it's a little confusing. However I do have to say that when I read any informational article/s on detailing, such as this one you wrote, I print it off, put it in a plastic holder and attach it to my "Detailing Information" folder, which then is immediately hung on the wall of my shop for future reference if I can't figure something out.

Your article, putting all other detailing articles aside, is by far the best I have ever read. Needless to say, when I open my information folder, your article will be the very first one available to me or some of my detailing friends who hang around my shop. What more can I say other than "thank you." An absolute, fantastic article!!

greymda
May 23rd, 2015, 08:22 AM
i hope the very good "how-to" from 1st post will be updates to the new pads and products :)

The Guz
May 23rd, 2015, 09:48 AM
i hope the very good "how-to" from 1st post will be updates to the new pads and products :)


Process is still the same with the new pads.

greymda
May 23rd, 2015, 09:51 AM
except a new dedicated pad for cutting

Blumax1
Aug 5th, 2015, 04:22 AM
Mike....Information like this is exactly why I visit this forum.

Dean K
May 26th, 2017, 02:30 PM
First time on MOL. Very informative article (DA Buffing 101) for first time user of MT 300 DA. I have always done correction, polishing, waxing etc., by hand. But wanting to work smarter took the DA plunge.

Also have a question. New (2017) VW CC has what looks like some acid rain damage on horizontal surfaces. But even if it's bird droppings, is the removal process any different?
I'd appreciate any thoughts or threads you can point me to that would help.

Michael Stoops
Jun 12th, 2017, 07:09 AM
Also have a question. New (2017) VW CC has what looks like some acid rain damage on horizontal surfaces. But even if it's bird droppings, is the removal process any different?
I'd appreciate any thoughts or threads you can point me to that would help.Removal process is essentially the same. Etchings from bird droppings are classed as below surface defects, same as swirls, scratches, oxidation, stains, etc so they are removed the same way. As with any below surface defect, however, the severity of the defect and the hardness of the paint will dictate how aggressively you need to work in order to remove them.

Dean K
Jun 12th, 2017, 10:24 AM
Removal process is essentially the same. Etchings from bird droppings are classed as below surface defects, same as swirls, scratches, oxidation, stains, etc so they are removed the same way. As with any below surface defect, however, the severity of the defect and the hardness of the paint will dictate how aggressively you need to work in order to remove them.

Thanks much.

germany
Dec 23rd, 2017, 04:44 AM
Looks like it is out of stock everywhere!

Nick Winn
Dec 30th, 2017, 05:43 PM
Looks like it is out of stock everywhere!

If you are referring to the G110v2 Dual Action Polisher in this article, this is an older tool of ours. The latest is our MT300/MT320 DA Polisher. Below is a video for reference:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fp2R7OgTu54

snozan
Jan 3rd, 2018, 11:37 PM
If you are referring to the G110v2 Dual Action Polisher in this article, this is an older tool of ours. The latest is our MT300/MT320 DA Polisher. Below is a video for reference:


And MT310 (Dont forget us here up in the north)