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Cipitio
Feb 2nd, 2005, 08:18 AM
Which LSP is better for light colors? (http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=4657)


Hi everybody,

I have a silver and a white car. I was thinking on increase my stock of Meguiars LSP (couple of tins of #16). :D

I read a lot that NXT and #26 are awesome for dark color cars.

I want to know your opinion about the best choice on LSP for light color cars.

Thank you for your responses.

Vandelete
Feb 2nd, 2005, 08:20 AM
:D NXT will do even good as on dark coloured cars...(can you post some nice pics of them maybe?)

Mike Phillips
Feb 2nd, 2005, 10:03 AM
Which LSP is better for light colors? (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=4657)


Or another way of asking this question would be...





"Is it true that some polishes or waxes are better for dark colors, like Red and Black, while
other polishes and waxes are better for light colors like Silver and White?"








Originally posted by Cipitio
Hi everybody,

I have a silver and a white car. I was thinking on increase my stock of Meguiar's LSP (couple of tins of #16). :D

I read a lot that NXT and #26 are awesome for dark color cars.

I want to know your opinion about the best choice on LSP for light color cars.

Thank you for your responses.

Hi Cipitio,

Here's the deal,

First of all, 99% of all cars being manufactured today have a clear coat, so keep in mind, most people are not working on a pigmented paint, but on clear paint. Clear paint is simply resin without color.

That said, if a car wax, or polish will make a dark or black colored paint look great, it's also making a light colored finish look great too it's just your eyes can't see the difference. This is why the best test for a product is always on dark colors and black paint specifically. The true results of a product are going to be the most apparent on black paint, whether its a single-stage finish or a clear coated finish.

The color that is the least efficient at demonstrating a difference is white paint, whether it's a single-stage, or a clear coated finish. This is why Meguiar's performs all of their testing on black paint.

What you see discussed on forums and elsewhere on the topic of some waxes being better on light colors and some waxes being better on dark colors is simply confusion.

You'll often read where someone will say,

"Brand X is great on light colors",

what is implied is that brand X doesn't make dark colors look good. If a wax or polish can't make a dark color look good, it isn't making a light color look good, your eyes just can't evaluate the difference.

The best waxes for appearance quality makes all colors look good and you can know this by whether or not the wax makes dark colors look good.

Think about it for a second, if you have two identical cars, for example two Honda Accura's. One is white with a clear coat finish and the other is black with a clear coat finish, if a wax makes the black Accura look great, knowing you're working on the same kind of paint, (a clear coat), it's reasonable to assume that it's going to make the white Accura look great, it's just you're eyes won't perceive the difference as easily as they would with the black Accura.

Conversely, if a wax doesn't make the black Accura look good, it's reasonable to assume it's not going to make the white Accura look good for the same reasons outlined above.

Mike

Cipitio
Feb 2nd, 2005, 11:31 AM
Thanks Mike for your very informative response. :xyxthumbs

JeffM
Feb 2nd, 2005, 02:17 PM
I have a white and a medium blue car. NXT looks great on them both.

My best gauge for how my car looks is to park it at a mall or at a gas station that is well lit up-at nite obviously. The car will have that "dazzle" to it under the lights. The blue one and the white one almost glow with NXT :xyxthumbs


My blue one is outside 24/7 also, and gets washed on sat. or sundays. NXT has been beading like crazy for 4 weeks now on it. I honestly havnt noticed any difference at all in the appearance or the beading in these 4 weeks either.

I dont know how many applications are supposed to be in the bottles of a liquid wax, but i have applied NXT to somewhere around 10+ vehicles so far, and only half the bottle is gone.

I put it on so thin that it really only looks like a streak. Lots of streaks :xyxthumbs I dont really get the haze when it dries either. It is translucent the whole time.

4 weeks and still going strong with 2 coats :bounce

John Styrnol
Feb 3rd, 2005, 08:11 AM
Pinnacle Paste Glaz, Poorboy's Natty's, Pinnacle Signature Series.

mirrorfinishman
Feb 3rd, 2005, 08:24 AM
I would highly recommend using NXT Tech Wax as a Last Step Product for light colors. I would also make the same recommendation for all colors.

Mike Phillips
Feb 3rd, 2005, 08:46 AM
Originally posted by John Styrnol
Pinnacle Paste Glaz, Poorboy's Natty's, Pinnacle Signature Series.

These waxes all look good on dark colors, they add richness and clariy, like Meguiar's waxes, so by default they will look good on any color including light colors.

Mike

AutoNova
Feb 3rd, 2005, 09:22 AM
Ideally #80 will really bring out the depth and give the paint a light cleaning, best used with PC or Rotary. Then top with #20 or #26 or NXT all these will bring back up the shine and gloss that #80 gives. #26 seems to get missed in all the hoopla of the new waxes but is still one of my favorites due to shine and ease of use and you can apply several coats.

Gen2
Sep 21st, 2005, 05:33 AM
Hi sorry to bring this thread back up again. I have read from some other forums that for silver car it is not advisable to use products that will darken the paint. If the polish or LSP darken the silver paint than it will not look as shiny, does this make sense ? In fact I am thinking of using #80 follow by NXT than top with #16, what do you guys think or is there a better combination? My customer is asking me to put a good shine on his silver car.

Mike Phillips
Sep 21st, 2005, 07:08 AM
Originally posted by Gen2
Hi sorry to bring this thread back up again. I have read from some other forums that for silver car it is not advisable to use products that will darken the paint.


That's just a misconception passed around by people that don't understand what what they're talking about. Remember who these people are, and give all their posts extra scrutiny in the future.

First, re-read what I wrote in my first post on the first page here,

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=4657


Read it carefully, especially the portion that talks about the fact that most cars have clear coats finishes, (including silver metallic), this means you're not really working on silver paint, but in fact are working on clear resin that has been sprayed on top of the silver paint.


When it comes to the word darkening, another way to think of it is you're making the clear coat more clear and that's a good thing! ;)

Each Saturday at our Detailing Class here at Meguiar's, I bring up this ridiculous subject of how the misinformed on other forums are always trying to make the case that darkening the paint is a bad thing, (I know the topic very well as well as the people that post such tripe).

Then in front of the eyes of 20 to 30 people, I show them first hand how much better their paint looks by making the paint more clear which tends to make the paint appear darker. In most cases, all you've really done is increased clarity, darkening can be thought of adding richness and who doesn't want their paint to look rich in color? Besides restoring or increasing clarity, the polishing oils used in many of Meguiar's products to darken, or add richness to paint, (especially single stage paints), and this increase in richness brings out the beauty of a paint by increasing depth, gloss, reflectivity, etc. All positive characteristics that car enthusiasts strive for in their car's finish.

You don't ever see anyone trying to make their paint dull, hazy, or less vibrant and less clear.


These demonstrations completely decimate the these arguments made by others that darkening the paint is a negative or bad thing for the paint. I repeat, it completely decimates their argument.



Even this Volvo we buffed out on Saturday is a clear example of how the paint now looks 100% better since we removed the defects, the oxidation and restored richness and clarity to the finish.


Before
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/2VolvoGrossSwirls2.jpg

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/2VolvoGrossSwirls1.jpg


After

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/2VolvoSwirlsGone1.jpg

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/2VolvoSwirlsGone2.jpg


We restored clarity to the driver's side of this black Corvette, which side looks better to you?

Before

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/212LayersofZaino2.jpg

Drivers side with one coat of hand applied NXT Tech Wax
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/2ZainoCorvette9RAW.jpg

Passenger Side

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/2ZainoCorvette7RAW1.jpg

Drivers Side

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/2ZainoCorvette4.jpg


Now re-read what I wrote on the first page and think about this, if you're working on a clear coat finish, (the Corvette in the above pictures has a clear coat finish), if a wax makes black paint look good, (more clear and thus richer in color), won't that wax do the same thing for a silver car with a clear coat finish?


The answer is "Yes".

But note this, chances are very good you're eyes will not able to perceive the dramatic difference in appearance on a silver, white, or or light colored car as compared to your eyes ability to see the dramatic difference in appearance on a black or dark colored car... but the change or difference is a reality, it takes place... you just can't always see it.

Yep, every weekend I do my best to demonstrate in living color the truth about the misinformation others post about changing the color, or darkening the paint.

It's all hogwash.

Remember who these people are that post this type of tripe and give all their posts extra scrutiny in the future. Because if they don't know what they're talking about on this topic, it could likely be they don't know what they're talking about on a lot of topics.

Hope this helps...

p.s.

It's kind of like what I wrote about discussion forums on the second post of the second page of this thread...

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=8331

Mike Phillips
Dec 26th, 2007, 08:30 AM
***Bump***

HK77
Sep 1st, 2008, 09:13 AM
Hi Mike,
Thanks for your very informative posts. But if every wax is not different on every colour, I'm a bit curious why almost all car care companies claim that Carnuba-based waxes give more warmth and depth in dark colour cars and polymer-based waxes give more shines and lack depth and are for light colour cars. Are they just for marketing purposes? Also, there is "Soft99" company which I think is the only company that always produces different for Light colour car and Dark Colour Cars and most of their products are colour-based. Even Clay Bar are separated for "Dark Color" and "Light Colour". But I think "Soft99" gone too much about color and must be for marketing. Honestly, I'm no one and don't know any details but just curios to know the truth.

Thanks

Mike Phillips
Sep 1st, 2008, 01:02 PM
Hi Mike,
Thanks for your very informative posts. But if every wax is not different on every colour,


I never said that. Please carefully re-read what I wrote...




First of all, 99% of all cars being manufactured today have a clear coat, so keep in mind, most people are not working on a pigmented paint, but on clear paint. Clear paint is simply resin without color.

That said, if a car wax, or polish will make a dark or black colored paint look great, it's also making a light colored finish look great too it's just your eyes can't see the difference. This is why the best test for a product is always on dark colors and black paint specifically. The true results of a product are going to be the most apparent on black paint, whether its a single-stage finish or a clear coated finish.

The color that is the least efficient at demonstrating a difference is white paint, whether it's a single-stage, or a clear coated finish. This is why Meguiar's performs all of their testing on black paint.

What you see discussed on forums and elsewhere on the topic of some waxes being better on light colors and some waxes being better on dark colors is simply confusion.

You'll often read where someone will say,

"Brand X is great on light colors",

what is implied is that brand X doesn't make dark colors look good. If a wax or polish can't make a dark color look good, it isn't making a light color look good, your eyes just can't evaluate the difference.

The best waxes for appearance quality makes all colors look good and you can know this by whether or not the wax makes dark colors look good.

Think about it for a second, if you have two identical cars, for example two Honda Accura's. One is white with a clear coat finish and the other is black with a clear coat finish, if a wax makes the black Accura look great, knowing you're working on the same kind of paint, (a clear coat), it's reasonable to assume that it's going to make the white Accura look great, it's just you're eyes won't perceive the difference as easily as they would with the black Accura.

Conversely, if a wax doesn't make the black Accura look good, it's reasonable to assume it's not going to make the white Accura look good for the same reasons outlined above.



I said if a car wax or paint sealant can make the clear coat over a black color coat look it's best than it's going to make any color look it's best because when you're working on a clear coat finish, you're not working on the color coat, you're working on the clear coat.

The goal when working on a clear coat is to remove as many of the surface defects as you can and then make the clear layer of paint as clear as possible so you're eyes can more easily see the color coat underneath of it.

If a wax or paint sealant when compared to a different product doesn't match the results of what the different product will do when working on a clear coated black finish then it's not going to give you any better results working on any other colored paint because you're not working on the color of the basecoat you're working on the clear layer.

Here's a challenge... ask any of these company's you site to read this thread and then challenge it and prove it wrong.

In fact, find a wax that won't make a clear layer of paint 100% clear when it's over a black layer of paint, but will do this over any other color of paint? (How could that be?)


When it's all said and done, after all the "TESTING" is done and the results are in... it's still going to come down to...


"Find something --> you <-- like and use it as often as you want your car's finish to have that just waxed look"


Besides that, sometimes the best thing to do is to buy the wax you're interested in and get it out side by side to whatever it is you're currently using or on another product you're interested in and decide with first hand knowledge which product is the best in your eyes and experience.

:xyxthumbs

b2bomber
Sep 2nd, 2008, 02:55 AM
I never was able to get the rationale why people said these as I've always thought that an LSP is an LSP, it wouldn't realy know what color it's being worked on. I guess unless there was a company out there that makes their product "color-specific" this m-i-g-h-t hold water. For now, I'll bookmark this thread to support my rebuttal to people who thinks a certain wax would be best on a particular color and highlight your challenge for them.