PDA

View Full Version : How to apply a very thin coat of wax with a G110v2



Michael Stoops
Nov 29th, 2010, 02:54 PM
How to apply a very thin coat of wax with a Dual Action Polisher (https://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?46754-How-to-apply-a-very-thin-coat-of-wax-with-a-G110v2)

This write up originally appeared in a thread about the Thursday Night Open Garage session where this experiment took place. But not everyone reads the TNOG Images threads so we're duplicating this in the How-To section for better exposure.



Prompted by a couple of discussions recently about application of a very thin layer of wax, and talk about the amount of product actually used, we thought we'd prove that you can indeed wax a car with just an ounce or so of product.

We used a small bottle available at WalMart, Target and the like in order to measure our wax usage. Application was with a W9207 Soft Buff 2.0 Finishing Pad (7" diameter, flat face) on a G110v2 at speed setting 3. The wax was NXT Generation Tech Wax 2.0. The car in question is a 1999 (4th Generation) Chevrolet Camaro. Obviously something as small as a Mazda Miata will require a little less wax than this, while a Chrysler 300C will require a bit more.

Let's get started.

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0026.JPG

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/2010_90_30_TNOG_001.jpg


First we poured some NXT Generation Tech Wax 2.0 into the sample bottle, but we didn't bother filling it. We knew we wouldn't need that much.

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0028.JPG

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0087.JPG

With our sample bottle holding more than enough product, we poured a bit of NXT 2.0 on the pad, distributing it over the surface.

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0099.JPG

Not a lot of product, but enough to get us started.

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0102.JPG

We covered half the hood with this first application.

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0104.JPG

2nd application of product to pad.

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0105.JPG

That pretty well finished off the hood and the entire front bumper. We also got started on the front fender with this application.

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0108.JPG

3rd application of product. This got us most of the way down one side of the car.

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0110.JPG

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0111.JPG

4th application of product.

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0113.JPG

We finished off the first side and half of the roof. This car has glass T-Tops but we waxed those anyway, just to mimic having that surface area to cover on a regular hard top vehicle.

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0117.JPG

5th application. As we did previously, just a thin line of product distributed across the face of the pad.

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0119.JPG

This got the trunk, spoiler, rear bumper, other side of the roof, and a small bit of the rear quarter panel one side two covered.

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0122.JPG

6th application. You can see how thin that line of product is.

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0125.JPG

That finished off the quarter panel and most of the passenger door.

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0130.JPG

With just part of the passenger door and front fender to go, we squeezed excess product out of the pad so that we could use it to finish the car. Here the tool is switched off and the pad is very firmly pressed against the paint.

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0131.JPG

There's the product we managed to squeeze out of the pad.

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0132.JPG

And we used it to finish off the car.

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0134.JPG

We even went back over a bit of the door just to ensure complete coverage - no extra product was added at this point, however.

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0135.JPG

Here's part of the door showing coverage. We went over every square inch of the car a couple of times at least, in different directions, to ensure full coverage. We didn't just give everything a quick brush with the pad just to make sure we could accomplish what we set out to do. No, we wanted to actually wax the car fully and honestly. Besides, we had too many eye witnesses. And a camera!!

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0139.JPG

This coverage on the hood is pretty indicative of how the entire car was covered.

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0140.JPG

Poor lighting here, but the spoiler and trunk are fully covered.

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0143.JPG

And here's the 2.4 once bottle showing where we started and ended.

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0145.JPG

And now for a bit of math to figure out what we used.

The usable portion of the bottle is 3.125" tall. That works out to 0.768 ounces of product per inch of bottle.

We used almost exactly 0.75" worth of product to wax this 1999 Camaro. That equates to 0.576 ounces of product.

Yep, just over half an ounce to fully wax a car that size, with a fresh W9207 finishing pad on a D/A. The whole process took about 10 minutes and after letting the wax fully dry it wiped off with almost no effort at all with a single microfiber towel.

So, are we saying you should only use half an ounce of product when waxing your car? Well, no. But to those of you who use 1/3 or 1/2 a bottle every time you wax we say "thank you!". But we also say "ease up, you really don't need to use so much!". In all seriousness, using the least amount of wax to get the job done is all you really need to use. No matter how thick you apply a wax there is only so much that will be left behind and bond to the paint. A heavy coat just takes longer to dry, is more difficult to remove and is simply a waste of product.

Black1
Nov 29th, 2010, 03:14 PM
Very informative, Michael.... Thanks. :)

Would you say Next 2.0 spreads less, the same, or more than #26 Yellow?

Michael Stoops
Nov 29th, 2010, 03:38 PM
You should be able to accomplish a similarly thin application using any of our liquid waxes, whether NXT 2.0, M26, M20, Deep Crystal Carnauba, etc.

J. A. Michaels
Nov 29th, 2010, 04:11 PM
Great post, Mike. This should help out a lot of people. They should really be able to relate to how thin a coat of wax is needed.

rcktpwrd
Nov 30th, 2010, 06:36 PM
awesome write up!!

When I recently did my PT with a DA for the first time, I was amazed at how little product went so far! :) I could never spread any wax/sealant product so thinly and evenly by hand before.

Johnson
Dec 1st, 2010, 06:20 PM
Wow, if every customer used it like I did before I seen this write up, Meguiars would be making some pretty good money off us! I have always wanted a write up like this. Thanks a bunch!

. It depends on the condition of the car, but would Ultimate Compound use the same amount as the wax or a little more. I need to gauge my usage on Ultimate compound as well

mattya802
Dec 7th, 2010, 04:01 PM
Should we be going over the same area multiple times just like you do when doing paint correction? Generally with paint correction I do 2 passes "top to bottom" and 2 passes "left to right". When waxing, I don't generally do that much, but should I be?

Sometimes I feel as if I'm not getting total coverage, but I also don't want to be over applying like stated so many times on these forums.

Michael Stoops
Dec 7th, 2010, 04:16 PM
As an example, let's look specifically at applying wax to the hood of a vehicle. Since you can usually cover a lot of surface area with just a little product, you should be able to apply a small amount in overlapping passes (roughly a 50% pad overlap) in up and down strokes going from the leading edge of the hood to the cowl and back. Once that area has been covered in that direction, you can then go back over it in a side to side motion from the fender to the center line of the hood, still using a 50% pad overlap. Then do the other side of the hood the same way.

Use this overlapping process, first one direction then the other, for each panel you do. That should give you good, uniform coverage over the entire vehicle.

And remember, you're just using light to moderate pressure with the tool set on speed 3, but you're moving the tool over the paint fairly quickly relative to your movements when correcting defects.

mattya802
Dec 7th, 2010, 06:52 PM
Awesome, that clears it up a lot. Thanks Mike.

Albert87
Feb 27th, 2011, 10:08 AM
Something naturally for myself!
but This Amounth is really surpirsinly low :O
i think last time i waxed my Golf i really smeared it all over till it turned grey:$
but since its red and a free sample bag
i tought why not but.! yes saves you a lot of time if done right!

really also for my work! 45 minutes to wax on wax off! ><

MARKCORE
Jun 28th, 2011, 07:58 AM
How do you know when you need to add more product?

Michael Stoops
Jun 28th, 2011, 08:29 AM
When it starts to look like you're not really laying anything down on the paint, it's time to add some more product to the pad. But it doesn't take much product, just a few drops. Plus, after you've covered maybe half or two thirds of the vehicle, your applicator pad is to a point where it's holding a fair bit of product. At that point, before adding any fresh product, try pressing the pad against the paint with the tool switched off - this will force some of that excess product to the surface of the pad and you can continue to spread it.

scottphys
Jun 28th, 2011, 03:04 PM
Can you give some ideas about starting the process? For me, it seems the pads can absorb the product more than spread it on the paint. Is spraying something like UQW on the clean pad before applying wax/sealant ok?

Michael Stoops
Jun 29th, 2011, 08:43 AM
The pictures tell the story, really:


With our sample bottle holding more than enough product, we poured a bit of NXT 2.0 on the pad, distributing it over the surface.

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0099.JPG

Not a lot of product, but enough to get us started.

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0102.JPG

We covered half the hood with this first application.

http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/1684/medium/2010_90_30_TNOG_0104.JPG

That small amount you see for the first application is what we started with, then with just light to medium pressure we covered half the hood. From then on we just repeated the process until we were 3/4 of the way around the car, at which point we pressed the pad against the paint to force any excess out of the pad, then spread that around to finish things off.

blue-sun
Jun 29th, 2011, 08:52 AM
The pictures tell the story, really:



That small amount you see for the first application is what we started with, then with just light to medium pressure we covered half the hood. From then on we just repeated the process until we were 3/4 of the way around the car, at which point we pressed the pad against the paint to force any excess out of the pad, then spread that around to finish things off.

Something that I do is I dab the paint with the pad once the wax has been poured onto the pad. I dab the paint in about 4-5 spots where I'm going to be applying it. Then I proceed as Michael has described. That way there's product all over the panel and can be spread a bit more evenly.

When I did my car with UW back in Feb here's how much I put on the pad:

http://blue-sun.net/Details/MS3UW/Images/4.jpg

and after dabbing the pad on half my roof
http://blue-sun.net/Details/MS3UW/Images/5.jpg

http://blue-sun.net/Details/MS3UW/Images/6.jpg

And after spreading it around (hard to tell on white paint in bad lighting in my garage.
http://blue-sun.net/Details/MS3UW/Images/7.jpg

Hope that helps!

scottphys
Jun 29th, 2011, 06:35 PM
Yes, the pictures do help a lot. Maybe it's just my imagination, but it sure seemed to me that, when I start, more product got sucked into the pad than was put on the car. I've been compensating by going back over the area where I started after I was done with the rest of the car.
I'm going to do this again this weekend and pay closer attention to this.

Thanks guys!

robert2011
Oct 30th, 2011, 08:36 AM
Thank you for the thread! I just applied Nxt on the hood (second coat) and #16 on the top with the brown pads. It looks so uniform and thin, easy to wipe off too, especially #16.

Never applied any LSP by a DA before. I can't believe it so easy. The only extra thing I have to do is to mask all the plastic things. It's worth it thou. No more hand waxing!!!!!!!!!!!!!

:dancing3

FIREdawg
Oct 30th, 2011, 10:32 AM
Yes, the pictures do help a lot. Maybe it's just my imagination, but it sure seemed to me that, when I start, more product got sucked into the pad than was put on the car. I've been compensating by going back over the area where I started after I was done with the rest of the car.
I'm going to do this again this weekend and pay closer attention to this.

Thanks guys!

I have to agree with Scott. Using DA + ULW + Finishing pad didnt seem like I was leaving much if anything on the paint, more was being absorbed by the pad. It was on black paint, so the noticed product would be apparent. It seemed to be wrong with what I've read so I stopped and applied rest by hand. Next time I will continue through with the process and see the results.

Thanks for posting! Great info.


FD

STRIFE
Oct 30th, 2011, 12:22 PM
http://www.meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?43582-Meguiar-s-Quik-Tips-Video-Series-Waxing
at the 2:00 mark....on this quik vid, shows the waxing motion....though it seems the use of the wax was quite liberal

ffboy
Dec 26th, 2011, 06:58 PM
I love this thread! though i have no d/a polisher, I'm trying to replicate this using my "all natural" d/a polisher, my hand using the nxt 2.0 and so far its been successful. I like being able to apply a thin coat of wax although sometimes thin coats may not seem sufficient, a reason why i sometimes apply too thick a coat of wax.

rossmeister
Mar 28th, 2012, 10:41 PM
Reading this particular thread makes me want to invest in a good D/A polisher. Any ideas? Are the cordless products useless? Is corded the only way to go? How hard ( or soft ) do I press? So many questions, so little time.

Murr1525
Mar 29th, 2012, 06:22 AM
Cordless can spread wax, thats about it.

Meguiars, Griots, Porter Cable are all popular.

For waxing, dont need to press much at all. For swirls, need to press to the point right before the pad stops spinning freely.

kuko
Jun 8th, 2015, 10:54 AM
I applied NXT only by hand and thought it is not so good wax. But since I applied it with DA I found out that it is great wax and my car looks great. Interesting ��

3xzsucof
Jul 21st, 2015, 07:06 PM
Wanted to say that I was given the link to this thread, and it's completely changed the way that I apply wax and sealants. I guess I never really applied them correctly. :icon_bolt1 lol

Basically I used about double what I now use.

Just helped my sister clean her car and applied ulw and nxt2.0, following the pictures here as a reference and am blown away by the ease and results.

BTW I found ulw then nxt2.0 on top made the water we splashed onto it to almost form a complete sphere when sitting on an almost flat surface. Which was awesome, it rolls off from just about any spot on the car.