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Don
Mar 1st, 2005, 03:54 AM
Much to the wife's dismay, the detailing bug has taken another bite. This time in the form of a rotary polisher. After listening to everyone talk about the advantages of the rotary over the PC (on severe finishes) I ordered one last night from Harbor Frieght Tools along with a velcro pad from CMA. They should arrive by the end of the week.

I figure I won't be doing any wet-sanding repair or other similar heavy buffing, nor will I be using it all the time on every car. Plus I didn't want to spend $200 on a machine that should I become afraid of, or decide that it isn't for me be wasted cash that I would never hear the end of (even if I were able to resell at no loss, the wife HAS NO sense of humor when money is concerned).

SOOO, I did some searching and posted on another board about an inexpensive V/S rotary. They gave me THIS LINK. (http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=46507)

$32.98 (on sale) for a Chicago/Electric and the $22.90 for the velcro backing plate for a total of $55.88 (both prices inc shipping) was a deal I couldn't pass up. I ordered a 6" backing plate so I could use the same foam pads for both the rotary and the PC to cut costs.

I know that I bought the "economy car" of the rotary polishers, but I figure that It's best to learn how to drive in a Chevette before buying a Corvette.

Any comments or advice are greatly appreciated.

Tim Lingor
Mar 1st, 2005, 06:11 AM
Hi Don,

If you plan on only using the rotary occassionally, then the Chicago/Electric may be all that you need.

However, once you get used to using the rotary, you will discover why some of us love using it so much! :xyxthumbs

Tim

Don
Mar 1st, 2005, 06:49 AM
I was thinking that if I started by keeping it on the lowest speed setting and using only milder products like #2 & #9, I should be able to learn and not burn ;)

RamAirV1
Mar 1st, 2005, 09:13 AM
I was always wondering about that rotary! I thought it seemed like a good buy, and now it's on sale for half price. Be sure and let us know how you like it. That's too good of a deal to pass up. Even if you don't like it, you haven't lost that much money.

RamAirV1

scrub
Mar 1st, 2005, 02:52 PM
Originally posted by Don
I was thinking that if I started by keeping it on the lowest speed setting and using only milder products like #2 & #9, I should be able to learn and not burn ;)

I had the same thought.
1. Keep the buffer moving +
2. less aggressive products +
3. use the finishing pad to buff factory (clear coat) finishes should =

party:

Is this wrong? Check out this inexpensive tool from Rightlook (http://www.rightlook.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=119) to help prevent any mishaps. Not sure of the quality but for only $79. I'm debating on the rotary too.

Good luck!

RamAirV1
Mar 1st, 2005, 04:19 PM
Originally posted by scrub
I had the same thought.
1. Keep the buffer moving +
2. less aggressive products +
3. use the finishing pad to buff factory (clear coat) finishes should =

party:

Is this wrong? Check out this inexpensive tool from Rightlook (http://www.rightlook.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=119) to help prevent any mishaps. Not sure of the quality but for only $79. I'm debating on the rotary too.

Good luck!

You need to ask Mike about that one. Not all paint thickness guages are created equal. However, I don't remember the differences. Some of them are quite expensive.

RamAirV1

Boss_429
Mar 4th, 2005, 05:49 PM
Don,

Congrats on your purchase of the rotary!

Anyhow, you'll be able to read a lots of tips and tricks if you browse around for a while. However, I think the best tip you can get is this........... find a "beater" or something you can practice on. If you can find someone to help you who is experienced in the use of a rotary....... so much the better! Much of learning how to use a rotary buffer involves the "feel" of the combination of the machine, speed setting, pad, and the product you are using. Once you've experienced that "feel", a lot of what you read on the subject will make sense.

Trust me, once you get the "knack of it", you'll be able to do things that the PC just can't do, or you will be able to do those things that the PC can do......... or thing that the PC can do, only much faster. Not that the PC isn't a fine, handy tool................ because it is. But it's not a rotary.

On the flip side, a rotary can also do "bad" things......... much faster! Hence my recommendation for getting a feel for the machine on something that mistakes won't matter.

Good luck.

94gpse
Mar 4th, 2005, 07:31 PM
I bought one of those Chicago/Electric Rotarys and I think it is great for use on everyday cars. I mean for $25.00 bucks if something happens to it just buy another one. Just thought I would share my expierence with this particular rotary.

Fidel
Mar 4th, 2005, 11:43 PM
Congrats on your purchase!

I actually did the other way around. I was using a rotary way before I finally decided to get a PC. I just got one a few weeks back.

Nowadays, I use the PC for wax application and removal and for the occasional pure polish. But as for DACP, its now partnered with my Rotary.

Anyway, its great you finally decided to make the jump. You won't regret it.. its a great tool once mastered.

Don
Mar 5th, 2005, 02:13 AM
BOSS I've tried to use a single speed rotary w/wool pad in the past with very mixed results...a couple of burns and some really good looking areas. The problem then was:

1) Little to no experience with a 'fast' buffer, I'd only used a GEM orbital up to that point, no P/C.

2) The machine I had borrowed was a single speed.

3) I was using some pretty heavy compound.

Fast forward 15 years and now I've had a lot more experience, discovered the "Less is best" philosophy and not least of all, far better products (Meguiars 80 series) for the 'heavy' work. I will never touch a Non-Meguiars (diminishing abrasive w/TS oils) compound again.

I've already decided to start with light products such as #2 and #9, keep the machine at it's lowest settings and use polishing or finishing pads until I get "the feel" for it all.

Boss_429
Mar 5th, 2005, 05:27 AM
Don,

Sounds like you've got a great approach worked out! I'm sure the feel will come to you quickly and you will be pleased with the results. :xyxthumbs

jaxxx
Feb 19th, 2009, 09:07 AM
so how was it??? 4 years later ... lol