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View Full Version : Meguiar's Guitar Care products (Sold under the Fender name)



John_Wayne777
Mar 12th, 2005, 10:44 AM
A lot of us that are nuts about our cars are also nuts about other stuff, like maybe guitars. The great news is that Meguiar's is now producing a line of finish care products for guitars, marketed under the Fender name!

Fender Instrument Care by Meguiar's (http://www.fender.com/products/search.php?section=accessories&cat=miscellaneousaccessories&subcat=fenderbymeguiarscareproducts)

I have been searching for YEARS to find something that would care for the finish on my guitars, but inevitably the products that are out there usually dissapoint. Furniure products on most store shelves just don't do a good job because they aren't designed to handle the specialized finishes found on guitars. Specialty guitar care products never seemed to do a good job either, as the results were always disappointing.


No matter what I tried, my guitars always ended up with hazy, swirly finishes from micro-fine scratches and the interaction of sweat and body oils with the finish of my guitars. Years of that kind of abuse can take its toll on even the best instruments, robbing them of their beauty and sound.

I was just browsing around one day and stumbled upon Fender's announcement of the new instrument care line made by Meguiar's. I was thrilled! Meguiar's car care products have done wonders on my cars, so I expected that their instrument care line would deliver the same spectacular results that their care care products had.

I was not disappointed, as these photos show. The first guitar pictured is a custom made Heritage 535 semi-hollowbody guitar:

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/666guitar_005-med.jpg

Notice what you do NOT see: No hazing of the finish around the top of the guitar where the playing arm rests. And take a look at the neck:

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/666guitar_004-med.jpg

Notice the deep, rich finish of the ebony fretboard. And take a look at what you don't see in the next picture:

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/666guitar_007-med.jpg

No swirl marks, microfine scratches, or built up crud! The Meguiar's guitar care package cleaned and polished the guitar's finish to BETTER than it was when I bought it new. Some of the flaws it had when it left the guitar store were GONE after using Meguiar's swirl remover.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/666guitar_001-med.jpg

The polish gave the guitar a deeper, clearer luster than it has ever had. The Chrome polish did a great job too, and was so gentle that excess polish didn't harm the guitar's wood finish.

As good as those results were, I decided to try the guitar care products on an old Gibson small bodied acoustic guitar. This guitar belonged to my grandmother, who received it from my dearly departed grandfather as the first Christmas present he ever gave her.

This isn't just an instrument, but is an heirloom and a reminder of people that I love dearly.

Unfortunately the guitar had never been properly cared for. It had spent the last 56 years being tossed in closets, banged against vaccum cleaners, and neglected. It hadn't even been out of its tattered case in almost 15 years.

Needless to say, there was a lot of built up crud on the finish which has now cracked. I was worried about using anything on the finish for fear that it might make the situation worse. I figured that if anyone's products could work, Meguiar's would and would not harm the guitar.

I was right:

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/666guitar_008-med.jpg

No hazing, no crud! Even on an old brittle finish Meguiar's swirl remover was able to clean up imperfections. The polish did a good job too, restoring luster that I thought impossible before I started:

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/666guitar_012-med.jpg

The finish was flat and completely non-reflective before I treated it with Meguiar's. The fretboard was even worse, as it had NEVER been oiled in the last 56 years. I applied the fretboard conditioner 5 TIMES, and the thirsty wood drank every drop eagerly. As a result, the once ashy and awful looking rosewood is now dark and rich in appearance:

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/666guitar_009-med.jpg

As you can see, guitar players now have reason to rejoice! Our beloved instruments can now receive the same excellent care that our vehicles have had, and we can do it at a very reasonable price without having to worry about damaging our vintage instruments.

My commendations to the Meguiar's staff who have helped me to protect my cherished instruments and to preserve a priceless heirloom for another 56 years.....

SingingSabre
Mar 12th, 2005, 12:10 PM
For my fretboard I always use Guitar Honey (http://www.tonefactor.com/proddetail.php?prod=GuitarHoney). This stuff is the best product I have found for fretboards.

I want to get some of Meg's products for my acoustics... Soon, I'll be trying out M#80 topped with NXT for my electric. We'll see how that works. :D

Amazing guitars. Do you have sound clips anywhere? I love that hollowbody! Rawr!:db:

John_Wayne777
Mar 12th, 2005, 03:55 PM
I have actually discovered that some of the paint used on the Stratocasters (the solid color ones) is actually about the same as the paint used on cars, so some #80 and a little time with the G-100A (on a low setting, of course) might do wonders....

My other obsession, and probably my worst one, is firearms. I LOVE guns. So now all I need is for Meguiar's to make some gun cleaning and care products. Come on fellas....I know you have it in ya....

SingingSabre
Mar 12th, 2005, 04:40 PM
Originally posted by John_Wayne777
I have actually discovered that some of the paint used on the Stratocasters (the solid color ones) is actually about the same as the paint used on cars, so some #80 and a little time with the G-100A (on a low setting, of course) might do wonders....

My other obsession, and probably my worst one, is firearms. I LOVE guns. So now all I need is for Meguiar's to make some gun cleaning and care products. Come on fellas....I know you have it in ya....

Yeah, most electric guitar paints are essentially automotive paints. I'm going to use a mf cloth with the #80 to really get it nice and smooth. Might even take some tech protectant to the plastic parts, dunno yet.

Firearm care...hmm...I'm a fencer...maybe some sword care (ooh, maybe All Metal Polysh?!)

Teak
Mar 12th, 2005, 04:49 PM
Nice work on the Guitars.

Guitar cleaning and detailing sans tuning or stringing, would make an interesting niche service or business.

Eric

SingingSabre
Mar 12th, 2005, 06:20 PM
It'd be nearly impossible, Teak, although a fun idea.

In order to really detail it one needs to remove the strings. I actually removed the bridge (the part on the body the strings cross over) on my electric guitar to actually get the area there more thoroughly. This means I'll have to set that up once I put it back on. The height of it will need to be rechecked to make sure intonation is still on and everything sounds good.

Tuning and stringing would be the equivalent of washing and drying your car. Necessary, not really fun, but definatly a sort of art form. :) Actually...take back the "not really fun" part...I love restringing my instruments. Almost like giving them new life.

Teak
Mar 12th, 2005, 08:49 PM
Originally posted by SingingSabre
It'd be nearly impossible, Teak, although a fun idea.

In order to really detail it one needs to remove the strings. I actually removed the bridge (the part on the body the strings cross over) on my electric guitar to actually get the area there more thoroughly. This means I'll have to set that up once I put it back on. The height of it will need to be rechecked to make sure intonation is still on and everything sounds good.

Tuning and stringing would be the equivalent of washing and drying your car. Necessary, not really fun, but definatly a sort of art form. :) Actually...take back the "not really fun" part...I love restringing my instruments. Almost like giving them new life.
Thanks for the info.
Maybe a niche for some who is musically inclined or actually can play a riff or a lick.

Eric

John_Wayne777
Mar 14th, 2005, 05:59 AM
I will add that I removed all the strings when working on those guitars. It would have been impossible to get those results with the strings on...

Mike Phillips
Mar 14th, 2005, 06:06 AM
Cool thread... :coolgleam :bigups

I have sanded down and buffed out a few classic Fender guitars, I have the pictures somewhere... Here's what I learned however, when using a rotary buffer to remove sanding marks, it's important to have someone with strong arms in order to hold the guitar body while it's being machine buffed. I'm not sure how they would do this at the factory, perhaps they have a special jig?

rdarwa
Mar 14th, 2005, 10:46 AM
I bought the fender guitar kit for my husband for xmas...being on the road so much we haven't used it. Mike, have you ever been to the Taylor guitar tour in El Cajon? It is awesome! They actually designed a machine to pick up the guitar and buff them. The results are much better then by hand as well as faster. After all, if you are making 70,000 guitars a year, you are always looking at ways to makes things go faster without losing quality. I wish I had taken pictures. The machine moves the guitar all around to be able to buff all areas. I will give a review of the fender kit when we finally settle down in our new home in Florida! I will be trying lots of Meguiars products that I got for xmas when we get settled.

Ronnette

SingingSabre
Mar 14th, 2005, 10:56 AM
Mike: The best way to do that, from my limited knowledge, would be to rig up a clamp to fit around the neck without bending it. Easier said than done, right? :D

Rdarwa: That machine sounds awesome! I look forward to your review.


I just restrung my electric guitar and applied M#80 and NXT Liquid Wax (1 layer of each). Thread to come later today. It looks great...and you can still see some of the scratches (I don't want to take them all out...builds character!).

John: Your guitars are just beautiful. I'm going to drool some more and then leave.

the other pc
Mar 14th, 2005, 11:19 AM
John Ratzenberger (the actor who played Cliff on Cheers) has a terrific show on the Travel Channel called "John Ratzenberger's Made In America (http://travel.discovery.com/fansites/jrmia/jrmia.html)" in which he drives around the US touring factories, looking into their history and visiting with their employees.

On his shows he visited both the Gibson (http://travel.discovery.com/fansites/jrmia/goods/gibson.html) and Martin (http://travel.discovery.com/fansites/jrmia/goods/martinguitar.html) guitar factories. Talk about people who love their products, their customers work and their work!

All the buffing I could see was done by skilled craftsmen using large, freestanding machines. No jigs or fixtures, just an artisan holding the guitar in his hands and pressing it against the buff with an expert touch.


PC.


(Hmmm, I think somebody should tell John to visit Meguiar's!)

John_Wayne777
Mar 14th, 2005, 11:29 AM
Originally posted by rdarwa
I bought the fender guitar kit for my husband for xmas...being on the road so much we haven't used it. Mike, have you ever been to the Taylor guitar tour in El Cajon? It is awesome! They actually designed a machine to pick up the guitar and buff them. The results are much better then by hand as well as faster. After all, if you are making 70,000 guitars a year, you are always looking at ways to makes things go faster without losing quality. I wish I had taken pictures. The machine moves the guitar all around to be able to buff all areas. I will give a review of the fender kit when we finally settle down in our new home in Florida! I will be trying lots of Meguiars products that I got for xmas when we get settled.

Ronnette

I own a Taylor 610 in the Sunburst finish. The quality of Taylor's guitars is darn near impossible to beat, and their finish is tough as nails. I don't know how exactly they finish their guitars, but they certainly do it right.

John_Wayne777
Mar 14th, 2005, 11:32 AM
Originally posted by the other pc
All the buffing I could see was done by skilled craftsmen using large, freestanding machines. No jigs or fixtures, just an artisan holding the guitar in his hands and pressing it against the buff with an expert touch.


PC.


(Hmmm, I think somebody should tell John to visit Meguiar's!) [/B]

That is consistent with my limited understanding of guitar production. They have large industrial buffers in a fixed position, and they move the guitar itself around the buffers. They do the same in the production of firearms, BTW.

A skilled hand on a buffer machine is truly a thing to behold. In about 5 minutes they can take a guitar with a flat finish and make it shine like nobody's buisness.

Skilled craftsmen are worth their hire.

John_Wayne777
Mar 14th, 2005, 11:34 AM
Originally posted by SingingSabre

I just restrung my electric guitar and applied M#80 and NXT Liquid Wax (1 layer of each). Thread to come later today. It looks great...and you can still see some of the scratches (I don't want to take them all out...builds character!).

John: Your guitars are just beautiful. I'm going to drool some more and then leave. [/B]

You should hear how they sound....

:bow

SingingSabre
Mar 14th, 2005, 02:00 PM
Originally posted by John_Wayne777
You should hear how they sound....

:bow

Oh gosh...I just got back from one of my favourite local guitar stores.

They have a Taylor with some amazing fretboard inlays, soundboard inlays, and a wonderful rosette. The fretboard inlays are two whales intertwining, the soundboard one is a three-mast ship, and the rosette is a rope with nautical knots.

Sure, it looks good...but just pick the thing up. Only one word can describe it: Auralgasm.

I admire your Taylor very much, John_Wayne. Very much. I've always been impressed with Taylors, more so than I have with Martins (never been fond of the M's).

72elkyss
Aug 5th, 2005, 06:55 PM
theres aa really good guitar polish made by Kiethhollandguitars.com its a local shop here i tried it and it works really good dont know if u can order it online though but i heard the fender/meguires stuff is good

angusdope
Feb 21st, 2008, 09:43 AM
If you look at the first chapter of Dan Erlewine's book "Guitar Player Repair Guide", he actually recommends #7 Show Car Glaze for cleaning guitar finishes!

I use it all the time on my Les Paul and Ibanez RG550, though for my Seagull and Art and Lutherie acoustics I just use a damp cloth.

Mike Phillips
Feb 21st, 2008, 09:48 AM
If you look at the first chapter of Dan Erlewine's book "Guitar Player Repair Guide", he actually recommends #7 Show Car Glaze for cleaning guitar finishes!



He's correct, but it's not that #7 is a "Cleaner", it's just that it will have a cleaning effect when rubbed over any painted surface with some type of application material.

Same thing will happen with car paint.

Many times people make recommendations for the use of a Meguair's product that will get the job done but there actually will be a better or more specific product for the job but the author doesn't know everything about the Meguair's line so the just go with what they know.

Can't tell you how many times we've heard of people recommending #7 Show Car Glaze for use as a replacement for a rubbing compound, probably because DuPont sold a compound for years called #7