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View Full Version : white gel coat results are bad



lakesiderider
Sep 4th, 2011, 05:48 PM
i have been detailing as a side job for about a month now. Have done a few boats cars and rvs. I should have taken pictures but was in a hurry and did not have time.

It was a 40" gel coat RV 2003 that was white.


Process:
Wash
#49
#56

when i was finished i looked at it at an angle and you could see multiple spots that looked as if they were burn spots from not being covered. any ideas if these are just from never being waxed and covered for years or something wrong with my step.. I have never had this problem before. I even decided to wash the entire RV at the end of the process to seee if it would clean up any wax I left on there.



Also, when wiping off the wax it barely came off. Almost like it just sunk into the gel coat/fiberglass. It did not look like it was waxed after I finished waxing it.

Murr1525
Sep 4th, 2011, 08:56 PM
How were you applying the products?

BillE
Sep 6th, 2011, 02:57 AM
Ahhh poo...where'd my reply go...try again.

From my experience only...Don't be afraid to jump up to M-67 (One Step Compound) or even M-91 (Power Cut). Older gel-coat can be a daunting process.

Bill

Second 2 None Detailing
Sep 6th, 2011, 08:03 AM
I have this same problem sometimes as well but I use the 67 one step compound and it works pretty good. What'd you guys think about the one step cleaner wax? Would that take off a lot of oxidation because I was told from another detailer that all he uses is the one step wax and then he seals it. What'd you guys recommend for fiberglass rvs since buffing with a high speed would make the final finish look uneven?

BillE
Sep 7th, 2011, 02:38 AM
I have this same problem sometimes as well but I use the 67 one step compound and it works pretty good. What'd you guys think about the one step cleaner wax? Would that take off a lot of oxidation because I was told from another detailer that all he uses is the one step wax and then he seals it. What'd you guys recommend for fiberglass rvs since buffing with a high speed would make the final finish look uneven?

Are you referring to M-50 (Cleaner-Wax)? If so, and the gel-coat is in pretty good condition...it works well. I find that M-50 works really well on the side walls of RV's (they don't get the 'abuse' from the elements as the nose and tail do).

Bill

Second 2 None Detailing
Sep 8th, 2011, 07:54 AM
Are you referring to M-50 (Cleaner-Wax)? If so, and the gel-coat is in pretty good condition...it works well. I find that M-50 works really well on the side walls of RV's (they don't get the 'abuse' from the elements as the nose and tail do).

Bill

Yes I was referred from someone else to use M - 50 but I haven't used it yet because I wanna get someone elses opinion on it. How much oxidation will M -- 50 take off? Also, what sleant do you use?

BillE
Sep 9th, 2011, 02:50 AM
Yes I was referred from someone else to use M - 50 but I haven't used it yet because I wanna get someone elses opinion on it. How much oxidation will M -- 50 take off? Also, what sleant do you use?

M-50 won't remove 'that' much oxidation. Think of it as a 'cleaner-wax' that you would use on a car. Just doesn't have (nor is it suposed to have) the umph for oxidation removal.

For an LSP...Flagship Wax (M--63). A tin of that stuff will last long enough for you grandkids to have...LOL.

Just to give you an idea of a process...I 'did' a small boat in Seattle last week for a buddy. Thing hadn't even been washed in 10 years. Started with Power Compound>One Step>M-50>Flagship Wax. It did NOT come out looking new, BUT sure did look better, enuf that he sold it 2 days later :doh.

Bill

Poki
Sep 9th, 2011, 07:34 AM
I agree that a cleaner/wax is not strong enough for real oxidation removal. I have found that the process of application on fiberglass has a lot to do with the splotchy results. I work within about a 3 ft square area. I use a DA and first use vertical strokes, overlapping each one by half then go over the same area horizontally overlapping each stroke. This insures more even application of the product and works it in better. On RVs, the end caps are made by a totally different process (molds) and the side walls are not. They are a different type of fiberglass and the endcaps will oxidize more than the walls. Also, on some newer RVs the entire rig is clearcoated which helps reduce oxidation. After you determine which product will get rid of most of the oxidation, use the same overlapping vertical/horiz. technique to apply your wax. The fact that your product was hard to wipe off was probably due to the surface being dried out and soaking up the polish. A polish with some oils in it will help....yes, fiberglass does dry out.