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kty10
Mar 22nd, 2005, 11:56 AM
I purchased my PC during the holiday promotion and I'm hoping to finally use it once the weather permits. I have a real simple question...after I work in a product (#80 or #83) in a 2'x2' section, should I immediately remove the product, or do I have time to work in another section. What do most people do?

I'm also curious to know what techniques most detailers use to polish areas that are narrow or where there is a curved surface (where the rear bumper meets the trunk). Basically, I'd like to know if most people use their PC's to detail the entire car, or if they polish some areas by hand as well.

Mike Phillips
Mar 22nd, 2005, 03:38 PM
Originally posted by kty10
I purchased my PC during the holiday promotion and I'm hoping to finally use it once the weather permits. I have a real simple question...after I work in a product (#80 or #83) in a 2'x2' section, should I immediately remove the product, or do I have time to work in another section. What do most people do?

Hi kty10,

A couple of things,

Technically, if you're going to re-polish an area a second time, you should stop and remove all leftover residue before applying new product. This insures the new product will perform at its maximum potential as there will not be any leftover product to dilute the effectiveness of the new material.

As far as removing residue after working an area, it's probably best to go ahead and remove leftover product and then move on. This will insure the product is it's easiest to remove.

That said, I think most professional detailers that are working against time, will polish entire sections and even cars and then wipe-off and remove all the product being used at one time. I know this is how I do it even when I'm not working against time.

Like many things, it comes down to your personal preference with a strong influence from your skill level.


I'm also curious to know what techniques most detailers use to polish areas that are narrow or where there is a curved surface (where the rear bumper meets the trunk). Basically, I'd like to know if most people use their PC's to detail the entire car, or if they polish some areas by hand as well.

I polish everything I can by machine first, and then come back and treat any areas I could not reach by machine by hand. For narrow areas, hard to buff areas, sometimes you will be forced to only use an edge of the pad by tilting the polisher. Whenever possible however, always buff with your foam pad flat to the surface.

Lt1Corvette
Mar 22nd, 2005, 03:59 PM
Mike,
When you finish polishing a larger section of the car, is it normal for the product to be a bit more difficult to remove than if you wipped it off right away as you would working smaller section? Any adverse effects to using final inspection to aid in removal?

Mike Phillips
Mar 22nd, 2005, 04:28 PM
Originally posted by Lt1Corvette
Mike,
When you finish polishing a larger section of the car, is it normal for the product to be a bit more difficult to remove than if you wiped it off right away as you would working smaller section? Any adverse effects to using final inspection to aid in removal?

Compounds, paint cleaners, cleaner/polishes and pure polishes tend to remove easiest when they are still wet, (at least to some degree), versus completely dried. This is probably true of any companies similar type product.

If your skill level is high, and you're using a quality removal cloth, typically something soft with a plush nap, (like our new Supreme Shine Microfiber (http://meguiars.com/newproducts05/accessoryproduct_page.cfm?SKU=X-2010), or our new, Ultra Plush Super Terry (http://meguiars.com/newproducts05/accessoryproduct_page.cfm?SKU=X-2040), both offer a plush nap), this will make it easier to remove both wet and dried products.

What you want to avoid is instilling toweling scratches because you find yourself pushing really hard to break-up and remove any residue.

It is perfectly fine and acceptable to use a mist & wipe product like M34 Final Inspection or Quik Detailer, or even the new Speed Detailer to moisten and help soften any dried residue to aid in removal.

kty10
Mar 22nd, 2005, 04:50 PM
Thanks for the quick reply Mike...and good question LT1Corvette. I was wondering about the affects of leaving the product on too long, and Mike answered it in his 2nd reply. Great info as always!

Would you ever apply #83 or #80 by hand? Or would you stick to products like Scratch X or DC #1, #2, etc?

OrangeRcode
Mar 23rd, 2005, 08:25 AM
Originally posted by kty10
I purchased my PC during the holiday promotion and I'm hoping to finally use it once the weather permits. I have a real simple question...after I work in a product (#80 or #83) in a 2'x2' section, should I immediately remove the product, or do I have time to work in another section. What do most people do?

I'm also curious to know what techniques most detailers use to polish areas that are narrow or where there is a curved surface (where the rear bumper meets the trunk). Basically, I'd like to know if most people use their PC's to detail the entire car, or if they polish some areas by hand as well.

I am in the same boat as you. Purchased the PC during the holiday promotion and going to try it out on my Dad's old Ford pickup this weekend. It is suppose to rain but I plan to wash it and then move into the garage to clay and detail. Any temperature at which the polishes are harder to work with? I believe it is suppose to be rainy and in the 50s. Any advice Mike?

Mike Phillips
Mar 23rd, 2005, 08:49 AM
Originally posted by OrangeRcode
Any temperature at which the polishes are harder to work with? I believe it is suppose to be rainy and in the 50s. Any advice Mike?

The only time I really noticed an difference in difficulty is in extremely warm temperatures. Moderately cold to comfortable temperatures provide good working conditions as heat and low humidity tend to make product want to dry faster than when your ready for them to dry, such as when you're machine cleaning paint.

You shouldn't have any problems. There is a thread about temperatures in the Information Station forum under Meguiar's FAQ's

4. What temperature ranges are best for applying cleaners, polishes, and waxes degrees

When we talk about surface temperatures, we need to consider three factors:
Surface Temperature
Ambient Temperature
Relative Humidity
Surface Temperature (Actual surface temperature of the vehicle)

http://www.meguiars.com/faq/Image8.jpg
The best surface temperature range for applying cleaners, polishes, and protectants is approximately 60 degrees to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. More importantly, the surface does not feel warm or hot to the touch.

Basically, when you're working within this temperature range, it's not too cold, and it's not too warm to realize exceptional results from just about any Meguiar's product.

Meguiar's products will work easily within a much broader temperature range, such as, 50 degrees to 90 degrees Fahrenheit, but guaranteed best results will be achieved in the 60 degrees to 80 degrees range.

Ambient Temperature (Outside temperature)
Ambient temperature is the room temperature or the temperature of the surrounding environment. It's easily possible to have between 10 to 50 degrees difference in ambient temperature compared to surface temperature. This can make the difference between a product that's easy to work with, or hard to work with. Keep in mind, the hotter the ambient temperature, the quicker products will dry.

Humidity (Moisture in the air)
Simply put, humidity is moisture in the air. Technically there is Relative Humidity and Absolute Humidity, but as it relates to:

Applying
Working with
Curing, drying, hazing
Wipe-off or removal of car care products.
The simple explanation of moisture in the air, or more specifically, the amount of moisture in the air is the major factor, which will affect how easily or potentially difficult a product will be to work with, or a procedure will be to perform.

Low humidity, in warm to hot temperatures, will act to cause liquids to evaporate and dry more quickly. This can make a product difficult to work with or decrease the amount of time the product remains easily workable on the surface.

High humidity in cold temperatures can make products hard to work because it can dramatically increase the amount of time necessary for the product to cure, dry or haze (depending on which product you're using).

Low humidity in low temperatures tends not to be a factor in working with, cure times, and when applying and in the removal of cleaners, polishes, and protectants (Low temperatures are a factor, but not low humidity in low temperatures).

High humidity in high temperatures tends not to be a factor in working with, cure times, and when applying and in the removal of cleaners, polishes, and protectants (High temperatures are a factor, but not high humidity in high temperatures)

Extreme temperatures, both cold and hot will make any product more difficult to work with.

Direct sunlight
Direct sunlight will dramatically increase the surface temperature compared to ambient temperatures and make cleaners, polishes and protectants extremely more difficult to apply, work and remove.

Air current/Wind
Air current/air flow, or windy conditions will act to increase the evaporation speed and potentially making some products more difficult to apply, work, or remove. In some cases this can be a bonus, helping a wax to cure/dry more quickly.

Summary
The best conditions for using cleaners, polishes and protectants on automotive paints would be in a cool place, out of direct sunlight, in a surface temperature range between 60 degrees and 80 degrees Fahrenheit, with comfortable to low humidity, with a light breeze to create the perfect conditions for detailing your car's finish.

Common sense and a good rule-of-thumb is to avoid applying any product if the surface is too warm to touch with the palm of your hand comfortably.

50 degrees Fahrenheit = 10.0 degrees Celsius
90 degrees Fahrenheit = 32.2 degrees Celsius

OrangeRcode
Mar 23rd, 2005, 09:12 AM
Thanks for the tips and info Mike. Once again, you come through for me. :D :bounce

kev4bama
Mar 25th, 2005, 06:32 PM
kty10,


I have used both 83 and 80 by hand with a Gold Class Foam Applicator Pad. They work great for small or minor problems!


Kevin

kty10
Mar 28th, 2005, 10:43 AM
Thanks for the reply Kevin. I'll have to try using #80 by hand for those hard to reach, awkward places. I'm planning on detailing my wife's car soon using my G100 for the 1st time. I'm a little nervous. Hopefully I can get results as good as your Ford. It looks awesome!

OrangeRcode
Mar 28th, 2005, 11:18 AM
I used my G100 for the first time this weekend on my dad'd neglected Ford pickup. Needless to say, I was very impressed with the polisher as well as the the #80 and NXT. My brother-in-law and dad were both wowed by the results as well. I will post a new thread with the before and after pics if I can figure it out. Don't fee the G100. I let my 8 year old nephew have a hand at it. It would be very difficult to hurt a car's finish with one of these. :xyxthumbs