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Michael Stoops
Oct 28th, 2013, 01:27 PM
http://www.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/2188/medium/D30216_bottle.jpg



Product Features:


Removes DA haze from D300 step on delicate clears
Solution for haze prone delicate clears
Super fine cleaner/polish
Perfect intermediate step in a 3 step scenario
Not paintable



Part#: D30216
MSRP: $17.20

SwunMurrieta
Nov 5th, 2013, 12:07 AM
Hey I was right. I will definitely be ordering some of this.

The Guz
Nov 5th, 2013, 12:24 AM
Nice addition to the DAMF system. What pad is recommended?

CCC4me
Nov 5th, 2013, 04:31 AM
How does this compare in cut and finish to 205?

Are you now going to market the DAMF system as a three step with all three pads and liquids in one box?

Wors
Nov 5th, 2013, 04:49 AM
Very cool, how does it compare to D300?

wifpd4
Nov 5th, 2013, 04:54 AM
I just went out in the driveway and looked, my Obsidian black, super delicate clear, Lexus broke out in a smile. :)

greg0303
Nov 5th, 2013, 06:33 AM
I just have a technical question: wouldn't it be counter-productive to use this polish and then finishing wax, which is a cleaner wax ? Wouldn't a regular finishing wax be better ?

Rick McDonough
Nov 5th, 2013, 08:15 AM
I just have a technical question: wouldn't it be counter-productive to use this polish and then finishing wax, which is a cleaner wax ? Wouldn't a regular finishing wax be better ?

Good question. They had two things in mind when they formulated this product: 1. People who are going to go with a different last step product, other than D301 DA Micro Fiber Finishing Wax. 2. A cleaner for the DA Micro Fiber System if people have soft/sensitive paint and they need something that’s a bit less aggressive than D300 DA Micro Fiber Correction Compound.

Michael Stoops
Nov 5th, 2013, 08:27 AM
Hey I was right. I will definitely be ordering some of this.Yes, we noticed that :)


Nice addition to the DAMF system. What pad is recommended?The finishing pad, always.


How does this compare in cut and finish to 205?

Are you now going to market the DAMF system as a three step with all three pads and liquids in one box?Cut is well below that of M205. We don't have any plans at the moment to package all liquids and pads into a single kit, no.


Very cool, how does it compare to D300?D300 is the correction compound, D301 the finishing wax. D302 is a finishing polish designed specifically to remove any haze that might occur in the correction step with D300.


I just went out in the driveway and looked, my Obsidian black, super delicate clear, Lexus broke out in a smile. :)Sounds like the perfect candidate for D302, David!


I just have a technical question: wouldn't it be counter-productive to use this polish and then finishing wax, which is a cleaner wax ? Wouldn't a regular finishing wax be better ?Great question, Greg. On more delicate paint where hazing occurs with D300 we see mixed results with just D301 as a finish. Many people have instead moved to M205 on foam to refine the finish before applying their favorite wax or synthetic sealant. By offering D302 we can offer the user the opportunity to stay fully within the microfiber system to do everything if they so desire. But the intent of D302 is to remove DA haze with an intermediate step prior to waxing. So applying D301 after D302 shouldn't be a problem, unless the paint is so very sensitive that it doesn't like microfiber for application of the wax. In that case, it is recommended to move to a different wax/sealant applied via foam finishing pad.

Now, we know you guys like to experiment, so even though D302 was designed as a microfiber driven finishing polish we know someone is going to try it on a foam finishing pad. Go for it. We have, and it's pretty terrific.

RaskyR1
Nov 5th, 2013, 09:00 AM
Sweet! I'll post my feedback after I get a chance to use it. :)

STRIFE
Nov 5th, 2013, 09:14 AM
Sounds like people with black or dark paint just drooled a little.:drool1:drool1:drool1

The 3 DAMF fluids are going to further enhance the abilities of the average detailer....I look forward to adding this to my arsenal:drool1:drool1:drool1

jankerson
Nov 5th, 2013, 09:58 AM
Sounds like it might be a really good jeweling polish on a foam finishing pad perhaps.

C. Charles Hahn
Nov 5th, 2013, 10:03 AM
The product copy says "Not Paintable" -- presumably this means silicone or some such substance in the formulation, so.... durable fillers?

RaskyR1
Nov 5th, 2013, 10:10 AM
Look what showed up on my doorstep today. :)


http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i288/Raskyr1/null_zpsa5549ff6.jpg

Michael Stoops
Nov 5th, 2013, 10:45 AM
The product copy says "Not Paintable" -- presumably this means silicone or some such substance in the formulation, so.... durable fillers?

The microfiber system is part of the Detailer Line, not Mirror Glaze, and as such all of the liquids in it are not "body shop safe". But, um, "durable fillers" like a certain product that suddenly became very well known for exactly that? No. Do a test side by side with both D302 and that other product, and then strip them both (if you can fully strip that other product). You'll lose a bit of darkness with both once they've been stripped (you could say that about almost any product) but you'll go backwards with regard to defect removal with that other product and not with D302 (or dramatically less so). That assumes that by "filling" you actually mean the hiding of defects rather than the elimination of defects. A bit of darkening of the paint is a different matter altogether and that can ONLY be accomplished by leaving something behind. Stripping that something will remove the darkening, but if that product is truly filling, stripping it will also reveal defects that were once hidden but are now revealed. If, on the other hand, the product darkens but does not fill, then stripping it will cause a loss of that darkening but the defects will still be gone.

Michael Stoops
Nov 5th, 2013, 10:57 AM
Look what showed up on my doorstep today. :)



Sweet!!!

Here's a bottle we've had laying around the Training Garage for a little while. And the paint it finished off!

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/2188/D302inuse.jpg

RaskyR1
Nov 5th, 2013, 11:29 AM
I'm actually pretty excited to try the released version! For those of you that may or may not remember the NXTi training pics from a little over a year ago, this would be an updated version of the beta sample we were all able to take part in using/testing during the class. ;)

http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i288/Raskyr1/NXTi/20120922-DSC_1933.jpg (http://s75.photobucket.com/user/Raskyr1/media/NXTi/20120922-DSC_1933.jpg.html)

jvs1991
Nov 5th, 2013, 11:35 AM
How soon can I order this???

greg0303
Nov 5th, 2013, 11:43 AM
Thanks, Rick and Mike. Now I've got the idea behind D302. Nice addition to the microfiber line.

Michael Stoops
Nov 5th, 2013, 12:24 PM
How soon can I order this???
This should be available for order from your favorite online retailer in just a few weeks. Perhaps as soon as Thanksgiving weekend.

Meticulous-Detail
Nov 5th, 2013, 12:58 PM
Sounds like it might be a really good jeweling polish on a foam finishing pad perhaps.

+1 that's what I was thinking.

davey g-force
Nov 5th, 2013, 02:40 PM
Nice! This looks like a great addition to the DAMF line :xyxthumbs

C. Charles Hahn
Nov 5th, 2013, 08:13 PM
The microfiber system is part of the Detailer Line, not Mirror Glaze, and as such all of the liquids in it are not "body shop safe". But, um, "durable fillers" like a certain product that suddenly became very well known for exactly that? No. Do a test side by side with both D302 and that other product, and then strip them both (if you can fully strip that other product). You'll lose a bit of darkness with both once they've been stripped (you could say that about almost any product) but you'll go backwards with regard to defect removal with that other product and not with D302 (or dramatically less so). That assumes that by "filling" you actually mean the hiding of defects rather than the elimination of defects. A bit of darkening of the paint is a different matter altogether and that can ONLY be accomplished by leaving something behind. Stripping that something will remove the darkening, but if that product is truly filling, stripping it will also reveal defects that were once hidden but are now revealed. If, on the other hand, the product darkens but does not fill, then stripping it will cause a loss of that darkening but the defects will still be gone.

You picked up on what I was getting at, but to be clear I wasn't saying it in a negative connotation -- I don't think there's anything wrong with products that fill when it is known/expressed that they're doing so. They do have their place in the industry for some purposes.

The main characteristic I was looking at is that typically products that aren't body shop safe (containing silicones or ingredients of that sort) tend to be more likely to mask defects, or mask more defects than body shop safe polishes. The distinction, as you clarified, is whether the surface is able to be easily stripped clean or not; that's where I wasn't clear. Thanks for the response! :doublethumbsup2

OhioCarBuff
Nov 6th, 2013, 11:40 AM
Can you use this product by hand with a foam pad in the nook and cranny areas that you can't get to with the machine?

Stephan
Nov 6th, 2013, 11:50 AM
Can you use this product by hand with a foam pad in the nook and cranny areas that you can't get to with the machine?

An MF towel or EvenCoat MF applicator may produce results closer to the MF pad.

Michael Stoops
Nov 7th, 2013, 01:24 PM
Can you use this product by hand with a foam pad in the nook and cranny areas that you can't get to with the machine?No reason why you couldn't.


An MF towel or EvenCoat MF applicator may produce results closer to the MF pad.Perhaps, but if he's looking to use it where he can't get a machine in the first place, he won't have any DA haze in those areas to start with. Remember, this product is specifically designed to remove DA haze that can occur during the D300/DMC correction step. Yet, as a super fine finishing polish it's great to use with foam pads as well.

Superior Shine
Nov 7th, 2013, 04:51 PM
The biggest problem I had with D302 is using it to correct defects larger than what it was intended for. Use it as specified and you will grow to love it. Remember it is for very very light correcting, mainly light D.A. haze left from more aggressive correcting processes.

Michael Stoops
Nov 8th, 2013, 08:34 AM
The biggest problem I had with D302 is using it to correct defects larger than what it was intended for. Use it as specified and you will grow to love it. Remember it is for very very light correcting, mainly light D.A. haze left from more aggressive correcting processes.
Excellent point, Joe.

Here's a major point of departure between D302 and, say, M205: the abrasives in M205 are a very fine version of the SMAT technology found in our newer compounds. That means that even though the specific abrasives in M205 are very fine and therefore capable of refining a surface to a very high level, they are also very hard so if pushed, they can actually offer quite a bit of cut. For example, you can finish out to an incredibly high gloss with extreme clarity if M205 is used on a foam finishing pad via DA or rotary at slow speed, but you can also cut to a surprising degree with M205 if used on a microfiber cutting pad with higher speeds and especially on a very powerful (albeit expensive) tool like the Rupes.

D302 is very different in the way it behaves and it can't really be "amped up" by using it in an aggressive fashion. In and of itself it has very little cut so if you use with a more aggressive pad at higher speeds, all you'll really be getting is the additional cut from that pad/speed combo. This really is a case where the product is quite single minded in it's purpose.

Woodie6250
Nov 10th, 2013, 02:31 AM
This is #2 on my want list, just behind the new MF pads. As a regular user of the DAMF system, I have often used M205 rather than the D301 as a refining step after the D300 compound before going to my preferred LSP. This fills the gap perfectly.

davey g-force
Nov 10th, 2013, 02:19 PM
Excellent point, Joe.

Here's a major point of departure between D302 and, say, M205: the abrasives in M205 are a very fine version of the SMAT technology found in our newer compounds. That means that even though the specific abrasives in M205 are very fine and therefore capable of refining a surface to a very high level, they are also very hard so if pushed, they can actually offer quite a bit of cut. For example, you can finish out to an incredibly high gloss with extreme clarity if M205 is used on a foam finishing pad via DA or rotary at slow speed, but you can also cut to a surprising degree with M205 if used on a microfiber cutting pad with higher speeds and especially on a very powerful (albeit expensive) tool like the Rupes.

D302 is very different in the way it behaves and it can't really be "amped up" by using it in an aggressive fashion. In and of itself it has very little cut so if you use with a more aggressive pad at higher speeds, all you'll really be getting is the additional cut from that pad/speed combo. This really is a case where the product is quite single minded in it's purpose.

So does this have even less cut than UP?

Michael Stoops
Nov 11th, 2013, 09:20 AM
So does this have even less cut than UP?
It's very different from UP. In and of itself it has less cut than UP, but it also won't hide as effectively as UP will due to the polishing oils in UP. It's really designed for someone wanting to stay within the microfiber system but increase the overall quality of finish. That said, on foam finishing pads it works extremely well, too.

STRIFE
Nov 11th, 2013, 11:00 AM
Will D302 be available in larger sizes?
I'm thinking for myself, this would be step one of a two step detail on my cars when using the DAMF system if doing a 1 step with D301/finishing MF pad is not enough.

Detale
Nov 12th, 2013, 07:55 PM
This really is a case where the product is quite single minded in it's purpose.
I really like that. A true finishing polish.

Detail Supply Plaza
Dec 23rd, 2013, 03:39 PM
We will have this product available online shortly and in our brick and mortar early Q1 2014..
Check us out at detailsupplyplaza.com
;~)
Jane

J4o2el7
Feb 25th, 2014, 08:51 PM
Has anyone tried this on aftermarket paint? This may cure my current problem I posted in detailing 101, sounds like it might, and I maybe have to put it off for one more weekend if so. The mf system used on my job left a lit of da haze..... So this may fix it, but mur suggested a 205 on a finishing pad, and don't doubt him at all, he has been here a long time, but just wondering if this may work on the aftermarket paints as well.

Michael Stoops
Feb 26th, 2014, 08:11 AM
Has anyone tried this on aftermarket paint? This may cure my current problem I posted in detailing 101, sounds like it might, and I maybe have to put it off for one more weekend if so. The mf system used on my job left a lit of da haze..... So this may fix it, but mur suggested a 205 on a finishing pad, and don't doubt him at all, he has been here a long time, but just wondering if this may work on the aftermarket paints as well.
There is no reason why aftermarket paint should pose a problem for this product. We just responded to your question in the other thread but we'll add to it here: without seeing the level of marring you have on the car in question, and without having worked on it personally to get a feel for just how it's behaving, it's a bit difficult to emphatically state "do this and everything will be fine". Our first recommendation is to use material you already have on hand. If that's M205 and a yellow polishing pad, that would be our first choice. Step up to Ultimate Compound from there if need be. In fact, if you do not have either of those, you could actually give D300 a go on the yellow foam pad. I neglected to mention this in the other thread, but as I think about it I have worked on a specific car where the DAMF system hazed it badly but D300 on yellow foam was a dream! I had a very limited selection of liquids with me on that day, and this was the first time I used that combo, but it worked like a champ.

J4o2el7
Feb 26th, 2014, 12:09 PM
Thanks, sounds good, I have the yellow pads and D300 and the UC , i dont have the 205 yet, was going to go grab some, but maybe i will give this a shot first. Thanks for the pointers

Flawlessdetailco
Mar 25th, 2014, 12:20 PM
polish is a great new product I have used it in a couple different ways already, I have used it as a one stage with the finishing pad lots of shine and no haze its perfect for the customer who does want to spend the money for full correction and I have used it in the three stage paint correction it was designed for ... great product meguiars

ShineOCD
Apr 25th, 2014, 05:18 PM
I typically use Ultimate Polish with a black foam pad after I use the D300 and the Microfiber pad then I wax it with UW also with a black pad. Now I have the choice of using D302 polish with a foam pad or Microfiber pad. Is either one better than the other?

The Guz
May 23rd, 2014, 12:49 AM
Good review of D302.
http://www.detailedimage.com/Ask-a-Pro/product-review-meguiars-d302/

apthai86
Jun 13th, 2014, 08:28 AM
I purchased a new car 2 months back. The first thing I did was wash, clay, and used D301.

I'm now looking to put a sealant and not sure how to go about it. Would the following plan work?

Wash (with dawn)
Clay
D302
Sealant
Wax

davey g-force
Jun 15th, 2014, 01:38 PM
Yep, that would work if you're looking to remove some minor defects and refine the finish prior to sealing it up.

The wash doesn't need to be with Dawn - regular car wash soap is fine. Also, be sure to wait 12-24 hours between the sealant & wax. :)