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View Full Version : Xtra Cut Microfiber Discs



Michael Stoops
Oct 28th, 2013, 01:28 PM
http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/2188/DMX.jpg



Product Features:


Engineered for increased cutting efficiency
Faster cut than DMC Cutting Disc (20% - 25%)
Moderate to severe defect removal

Best on flat surfaces


Optimized for use with Meguiar's D300
No swirls - GUARANTEED
Machine washable (tumble dry with no heat)



Part#'s and Pricing:
DMX5: 5.5" disc, 2 discs per pack, $25.00 (MSRP)
DMX6: 6" disc, 2 discs per pack, $29.00 (MSRP)

SwunMurrieta
Nov 5th, 2013, 12:15 AM
What color is the foam on these disc? Just curious since the MF cutting disc are red to match the compound and the MF finishing disc are black to match the wax.

The Guz
Nov 5th, 2013, 12:26 AM
Looks like a time saver for harder paints.

Evan.J
Nov 5th, 2013, 03:00 AM
Cant wait to try this!

jankerson
Nov 5th, 2013, 03:04 AM
Still need to get around to trying the MF discs one day. :D

C8N
Nov 5th, 2013, 05:27 AM
Recommended backing plate?

greg0303
Nov 5th, 2013, 06:30 AM
Cool, we can get even more cut out of microfiber, if needed.

jvs1991
Nov 5th, 2013, 07:21 AM
Nice, good when you need that extra bite from d300.

Michael Stoops
Nov 5th, 2013, 08:20 AM
What color is the foam on these disc? Just curious since the MF cutting disc are red to match the compound and the MF finishing disc are black to match the wax.
A great question. There is no foam on these, other than the very slight amount of cushion provided by the loop backing. In the image below you see the current red foamed DMC5 Cutting Disc on the left, and the new DMX5 Xtra Cut Disc on the right. By taking out the foam we allow for even more transfer of energy directly from the tool to the paint. What our testing has shown is a 20-25% increase in cut over the DMC cutting disc.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/2188/xcutcomparison.jpg

RDVT4ME
Nov 5th, 2013, 08:38 AM
Mike,
That looks like the test MF disks without the interface pad.

jankerson
Nov 5th, 2013, 08:40 AM
Thinking about how M105 would work on those. :hide1

RDVT4ME
Nov 5th, 2013, 08:48 AM
Mike,
I assume this pad will also generate a lot more heat and folks trying this for the first time should be aware of that.

STRIFE
Nov 5th, 2013, 09:03 AM
Sounds like these pads are designed to cut faster, not necessarily cut more than the original cutting pads....so just a time saver for the pro detailers?
Will these be available in 3" versions...seems to make sense?

C. Charles Hahn
Nov 5th, 2013, 10:11 AM
Mike,
I assume this pad will also generate a lot more heat and folks trying this for the first time should be aware of that.

Agreed; I also wonder about delamination issues due to heat, and the possibility of welding the pad to the backing plate -- especially if they are used with a non-Meguiar's plate (e.g. Rupes polishers).

Interesting concept though, might even allow for tuning performance by adding one or more sanding interface pads between this and the backing plate.

Michael Stoops
Nov 5th, 2013, 10:24 AM
More cut vs faster cut is sort of a matter of semantics, isn't it?

As to the issue of potential heat, yes, there can be more and this is definitely taking the aggressiveness of the DA buffer up yet another notch. But as long as you're not leaning on the darn things, we aren't really seeing any more heat at the backing plate/pad interface than we do with the red foamed cutting discs.

Now, as we all know, the more the aggressiveness goes up, the more safety comes down - at least to some degree. So, yes, you'll want to be a bit more cautious on sharp body creases and older, thinner paint. As with everything else in this process, common sense goes a long way. Charles, you bring up a very interesting and astute point - having played with these pads a fair bit (and they do indeed cut like crazy on very hard paint) with an without a foam interface pad between it and the backing plate, I can tell you that you can indeed do a bit of "tuning" if you so desire. You will, however, notice an immediate reduction in cut by placing an interface pad into the mix.

Michael Stoops
Nov 5th, 2013, 10:37 AM
Thinking about how M105 would work on those. :hide1
No need to hide, we know people love M105, M101 and M100 on microfiber pads. :) And, yes, M100 is just a defect cutting demon on these.

Meticulous-Detail
Nov 5th, 2013, 11:33 AM
Good stuff, can't wait to try these out.

davey g-force
Nov 5th, 2013, 02:45 PM
Brilliant! These will be great when things need to get really aggressive ;)

C. Charles Hahn
Nov 5th, 2013, 08:22 PM
More cut vs faster cut is sort of a matter of semantics, isn't it?

As to the issue of potential heat, yes, there can be more and this is definitely taking the aggressiveness of the DA buffer up yet another notch. But as long as you're not leaning on the darn things, we aren't really seeing any more heat at the backing plate/pad interface than we do with the red foamed cutting discs.

Now, as we all know, the more the aggressiveness goes up, the more safety comes down - at least to some degree. So, yes, you'll want to be a bit more cautious on sharp body creases and older, thinner paint. As with everything else in this process, common sense goes a long way. Charles, you bring up a very interesting and astute point - having played with these pads a fair bit (and they do indeed cut like crazy on very hard paint) with an without a foam interface pad between it and the backing plate, I can tell you that you can indeed do a bit of "tuning" if you so desire. You will, however, notice an immediate reduction in cut by placing an interface pad into the mix.

That's sort of what I was thinking/hoping; with the variety of interface pads available from different sources made of different materials, it introduces a new variable to dial in cutting ability -- potentially even making them less aggressive than the MF finishing pads if the interface is thick and soft enough. Might even make the regular MF cutting and finishing pads unnecessary, if alternative interfaces work as well as I'm envisioning. Definitely something I'll be playing with as soon as I can get my hands on a few of these pads.

jankerson
Nov 6th, 2013, 04:54 AM
No need to hide, we know people love M105, M101 and M100 on microfiber pads. :) And, yes, M100 is just a defect cutting demon on these.

Have the 5" Pro backing plate and some MF Cutting Discs coming to see how they work for me, haven't tried the MF discs yet, will be using M105 with them.

But if they bridge the gap between the DA and rotary like they are supposed to I am sure I will be happy.

I do miss my rotary and wool pads...... :bawling1

I do want to get that Light Weight Flex rotary soon though.....

Meticulous-Detail
Nov 6th, 2013, 05:54 AM
More cut vs faster cut is sort of a matter of semantics, isn't it?

As to the issue of potential heat, yes, there can be more and this is definitely taking the aggressiveness of the DA buffer up yet another notch. But as long as you're not leaning on the darn things, we aren't really seeing any more heat at the backing plate/pad interface than we do with the red foamed cutting discs.

Now, as we all know, the more the aggressiveness goes up, the more safety comes down - at least to some degree. So, yes, you'll want to be a bit more cautious on sharp body creases and older, thinner paint. As with everything else in this process, common sense goes a long way. Charles, you bring up a very interesting and astute point - having played with these pads a fair bit (and they do indeed cut like crazy on very hard paint) with an without a foam interface pad between it and the backing plate, I can tell you that you can indeed do a bit of "tuning" if you so desire. You will, however, notice an immediate reduction in cut by placing an interface pad into the mix.

Correct me me if I am wrong, but don't we need some level of heat to correct paint?

Michael Stoops
Nov 6th, 2013, 08:32 AM
Correct me me if I am wrong, but don't we need some level of heat to correct paint?
No, not at all. A modern, catalyzed clear coat really doesn't like heat from friction, especially at higher levels. Back in the days of single stage lacquers there were arguments made for the heating and reflowing of the paint to remove defects, but even as a concept that's sort of a dangerous thing as the difference between the heat needed to allegedly "reflow" the paint and that required to quite literally burn it are pretty close. A modern clear will go from getting really hot to burned very suddenly. There is nothing positive to be gained from heating up a catalyzed clear coat.

You can achieve major correction on a modern paint system with virtually no heat introduced to the surface at all. Yes, some heat is going to occur as a by-product of the friction caused by the compounding step, but it's really of no benefit.

OhioCarBuff
Nov 6th, 2013, 11:41 AM
I notice these pads say "best for flat areas", if were buffing a car with a lot of curves etc, is it best to just use the regular cutting discs then?

Meticulous-Detail
Nov 6th, 2013, 11:46 AM
No, not at all. A modern, catalyzed clear coat really doesn't like heat from friction, especially at higher levels. Back in the days of single stage lacquers there were arguments made for the heating and reflowing of the paint to remove defects, but even as a concept that's sort of a dangerous thing as the difference between the heat needed to allegedly "reflow" the paint and that required to quite literally burn it are pretty close. A modern clear will go from getting really hot to burned very suddenly. There is nothing positive to be gained from heating up a catalyzed clear coat.

You can achieve major correction on a modern paint system with virtually no heat introduced to the surface at all. Yes, some heat is going to occur as a by-product of the friction caused by the compounding step, but it's really of no benefit.

:thankyou1

davey g-force
Nov 6th, 2013, 12:24 PM
No, not at all. A modern, catalyzed clear coat really doesn't like heat from friction, especially at higher levels. Back in the days of single stage lacquers there were arguments made for the heating and reflowing of the paint to remove defects, but even as a concept that's sort of a dangerous thing as the difference between the heat needed to allegedly "reflow" the paint and that required to quite literally burn it are pretty close. A modern clear will go from getting really hot to burned very suddenly. There is nothing positive to be gained from heating up a catalyzed clear coat.

You can achieve major correction on a modern paint system with virtually no heat introduced to the surface at all. Yes, some heat is going to occur as a by-product of the friction caused by the compounding step, but it's really of no benefit.

Wow, that's news to me. I too thought you needed some degree of heat to achieve correction.

When I finish buffing a section and I feel the pad with my hand and it's a bit warm I think "good it's working". (Obviously I know too much heat is bad.)

Superior Shine
Nov 7th, 2013, 04:45 PM
I've had these for over two or three years already to help the powers that be develop them. Cutting is outrageous!!! I like them best on large flat areas where cutting always seems the hardest to do. Yes I use the "foamed" backed discs for slightly curved areas and foam pads for highly curved areas. I haven't used these with m100 but they are amazing with M101, M105!! Declamation is a non-issue in my testing.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/500/IMG_13191.JPG

davey g-force
Nov 7th, 2013, 05:37 PM
Declamation is a non-issue in my testing.

Delamination? :confused:

Superior Shine
Nov 7th, 2013, 05:41 PM
Delamination? :confused:

Talk to text, Go figure.

Stephan
Nov 7th, 2013, 05:45 PM
Talk to text, Go figure.

how's that for irony...

definition of declamation:

exercise in oratory or elocution, as in the recitation of a classic speech.

Michael Stoops
Nov 8th, 2013, 08:28 AM
how's that for irony...

definition of declamation:

exercise in oratory or elocution, as in the recitation of a classic speech.
That's MOL for you - teaching how to detail cars while enhancing your vocabulary. We are the thinking man's detailing forum!!!:teach

Woodie6250
Nov 10th, 2013, 02:25 AM
As a huge fan of the DA MF system, this has just shot to the top of my "Want" list.

ShineOCD
Dec 8th, 2013, 01:15 PM
I notice these pads say "best for flat areas", if were buffing a car with a lot of curves etc, is it best to just use the regular cutting discs then?

See post #15 from Mr Stoops. Just need to exercise caution:huh1

punkguins
Feb 1st, 2014, 05:53 AM
I was curious about the cutting and finishing discs (DMC6 and DMF6) that come in the Meguiars DA Microfiber Correction System: what foam discs do these relate to? For instance, would the cutting disc, DMC6, be considered the same as an orange (or yellow) Lake Country disc ? And would the DMF6 be equivalent to the Lake Country grey (or maybe white)?

Just wondering how microfiber pads relate and which foam pads are their counterparts (if at all). Since I have both now, want to know how to use the tools in my toolbox!

davey g-force
Feb 1st, 2014, 05:08 PM
There are no equivalent foam pads to MF pads. MF has far more cut, so cannot compare the two.

*edit* maybe a MF finishing pad may have a similar level of cut to one of the more aggressive foam pads, but I've never heard the two being compared, nor am I sure why you'd want to.