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Mike Phillips
Aug 2nd, 2005, 11:25 AM
How often do I need to clay my car's finish? (http://www.meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=7494)

The question is often asked,

"How often do I need to clay my car's finish?"


The answer is,

"It depends on where you park your car and what's floating in the air"



If you spent one day detailing your car including claying it and applying a coating of wax, and the next day your car was parked in a parking lot like this,

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/2TheCarinTheParkingLot.jpg

And about 100 yards away is a painter elevated into the sky spraying paint onto a building like this...

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/2OversprayInAir002c.jpg

Then because the wind will tend to carry the overspray through the air until it finds a place to touch down and come to rest, you may very well need to clay your car the next day.

"How often you need to clay your car's finish depends on what's floating in the air where you park your car"


As I drove down the road from where this building is being sprayed, I stopped to take a photograph of this Corvette sitting behind a fence in the owners front yard while he was doing some upgrades to the house that required access to the garage.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/2TheCorvetteParkedOutside.jpg


It's completely possible the paint overspray being sprayed into the air just a few blocks down the road could come to rest on this Corvette's finish as well as everything else, including the window glass and the convertible top.


http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/gallery/data/500/2ThePaint.jpg



What Meguiar's teaches is that in order to know whether or not you need to clay, or re-clay your car's finish, you need to evaluate the condition of the finish, with both your eyes and your sense of touch.


So the answer to,

"How often do I need to clay my car's finish?"

Is as often as necessary and the way you determine if claying is necessary is to evaluate the condition of the finish, with both your eyes and your sense of touch.


Click here to make comments on this article (http://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=7495)

~~~~~~~~~~~~
Note: The above photos were all taken on August 2nd, at approximately noon at a nearby establishment.

rammsteinmatt
Nov 20th, 2005, 01:07 PM
I was reading about claybars possible taking off a layer of clear (whether it be .01mils or.05 mils). places (not here, that i can tell) recommend claying only 1-2 tiomes a year to ensure continued clear coat life.

how much validity does this statement hold. namely how often could i claybar my car and not suffer paint damage (obviously assuming i know to keep the bar lubricateded and such)?

on another post in this forum, you clayed the MBZ hood and noted no change in thinkness. however the gauge only seems to go to .1mil resolution. so say it took off an unmeasurable amount (.04mil, .5 would induce a rounding), if you did this every month for a year (.04 * 12) thats about .5mil gone. but this seems a little extreme, unless you live next to a switching yard. so say you clay 3x / year. in 4 years of just claying you could be risking clear coat failure, right?

is this something that i should really worry about, or not?

sneek
Nov 20th, 2005, 01:38 PM
you clay when QD becomes slow to wipe off

rammsteinmatt
Nov 20th, 2005, 03:02 PM
but that wasnt my question.

that answered: "when do i clay my car?"

im looking to find: "how often can i clay my car without damage?"

Mike Phillips
Nov 20th, 2005, 03:18 PM
For the most part, you can clay as often as you like as claying is non-abrasiveto the finish.

sneek
Nov 20th, 2005, 03:32 PM
lol sry i have really bad adhd and im not even joking

Accumulator
Nov 20th, 2005, 03:32 PM
Originally posted by rammsteinmatt
im looking to find: "how often can i clay my car without damage?"


Originally posted by Mike Phillips
For the most part, you can clay as often as you like as claying is non-abrasiveto the finish.

Well, *properly done* claying is nonabrasive to the finish ;) Some people do manage to mar their paint when they clay so they're presumably taking off some clear on a b/c car.

Heh heh, but then we've debated whether clay will (necessarily) even cut through LSPs, so it's sure nothing to worry about as far as wearing down the clearcoat. I don't even get significant paint transfer from most single stage cars I clay, though they *are* pretty well-maintained paintjobs.

rammsteinmatt
Nov 21st, 2005, 07:38 AM
thanks for all the help everyone

jchetty
Nov 21st, 2005, 09:12 AM
i have a white car and clay once a month to prepare for wax...i have not noticed any clearcoat failure and have had the car for almost 3 years..imo using a mild clay does no damage...i would rather clay than leave the bonded surface contaminants to etch the paint

Mike Phillips
Nov 15th, 2006, 12:19 PM
***Bump***

RacerX88
Jun 20th, 2008, 08:57 AM
FWIW: When you run the back of your hand across and horizontal panel (e.g. hood, roof, trunk or the window pillars) and it feels rough.

Racersky
Jan 8th, 2009, 08:41 PM
I remember seeing someone using a sandwich bag on a car to see if it needs to be clay on a fully washed and dried car. Not sure if that's a good thing to do.

Nappers
Jan 8th, 2009, 08:42 PM
If memory serves, Mike used a sandwich bag to illustrate that the paint on a new pickup truck needed to be clayed. I think pressure and amount you rub comes into the equation when doing that.

Murr1525
Jan 8th, 2009, 08:49 PM
Yes, the plastic sandwich bag kind of enhances the bumps, so you feel them better.

Dont really need to rub hard to do it.

miahjohn
Jan 8th, 2009, 09:40 PM
those pics reminded me of my dad spray painting his trailer with a rattle can while his brand new chevy truck was parked right next to it. when i yelled at him to stop he had no idea that all that paint spray was landing directly on his new truck! in no time at all his entire truck was covered with black speckles:furious1

Mike Phillips
Jan 9th, 2009, 09:19 AM
Some people use a plastic baggie to heighten their sensitivity to contaminants on the surface but from a big picture point of view, either that paint has bonded contaminants and you need to clay it or not.

Does that make sense? If you feel your car's paint with your clean hand and feel little bumps then you need to clay the car. Doing so with a plastic baggie or the wrapper off a pack of cigarettes, (another popular option discussed on forums), doesn't change that you still need to clay the car.

In the BIGGER picture, if the car has not been clayed for a while and it's a daily driver that's parked outside at least some portion of each day then it's likely it needs to be clayed no matter how you check for above surface bonded contaminants.

Our Honda Pilot is parked inside our garage all the time except when we use to to go out or to go the store. The point being is it's hardly ever parked outside where it can be come contaminated. Yet after I wash the paint and then inspect it, I almost always feel little bumps on the paint that signify somethings landed on it, bonded to it, hasn't washed off and now I need to clay the paint again.

So if this is happening to a car that spend most of it's time under cover, out of the open air and wind and it gets above surface bonded contaminants then cars parked in the elements more than this probably also need to be clayed after probably only a few weeks to a month, (if they're parked outside), whether you feel with just your hand or with a baggie.

FWIW
I never us a baggie to inspect my paint, I can feel with my sense of touch well enough to make the clay/no clay decision before waxing or going into a full detail session.

:)

janjirock
Jan 14th, 2009, 05:56 PM
maybe..anyone can recommended a product name....for frequent used of clay...

Tuck91
Jan 14th, 2009, 06:48 PM
maybe..anyone can recommended a product name....for frequent used of clay...
The Meguiars Smooth Surface clay kit

or you could purchase the new clay bar replacement pack

Murr1525
Mar 4th, 2009, 03:16 PM
Well, of course it has been asked before. But simply,

Smooth Surface / Quick Clay (White) - Mild
Pro-Line Mild Clay (Blue) - Mild/Medium
Pro-Line Aggressive Clay (Red) - Strong

Should not need more than the white or blue clay as far as every day use. The Red clay can leave marring, best to only use it if following up with a machine to buff the paint.

splash
May 14th, 2009, 12:00 PM
Let assume that i detail my car today then i found after one weekthat i need to clay my car so what shall i do after claying my car?

polishing then wax or ....?

Alex C.
May 14th, 2009, 12:10 PM
So you clayed the finish one week and a week later it needs to be clayed again? That's some fast-acting contamination!

splash
May 14th, 2009, 12:33 PM
so what are the actions behind that.
Is that means that I should polish and wax the car again ?

Alex C.
May 14th, 2009, 12:40 PM
Wax, definitely. But cleaning and polishing, that's really your call. Does it look like the paint finish would benefit from either before an LSP? If you want, you could clay the paint then use an AIO(all in one) like ColorX or D151.

Murr1525
Jul 17th, 2009, 11:22 PM
I didn't think that we have to do it often.

You might not need to do it often. All depends on the environment, and when you feel like doing it.

Cant say I always clay the minute I need to.

beautechnique-scott
Jul 19th, 2009, 08:43 AM
if i were you after washing and dry with a towel and QD do the sandwhich bag check and see if it needs it.
if so i always say polish then wax as the paint will get cleaned/cleansed and remove any faint marring that you or the clay may have caused ( it does happen from time to time )
if your doing it very often use the megs quick clay kit or just the clay with a mild mix of bottled water and ph neutral shampoo.
anything more aggressive will cause marring and will result in definate polishing and even maybe DA/rotary work to correct it.

Markus Kleis
Jul 19th, 2009, 11:15 AM
You might not need to do it often. All depends on the environment, and when you feel like doing it.

Cant say I always clay the minute I need to.

Our buddy Carl was a spammer. Ignore his baloney post. Carry on :D

NiNe STaR SHiNe
Jul 25th, 2009, 10:01 AM
sounds like you needed to have applied more pressure with the clay, make more passes, or move up to a more aggressive clay bar

BlackScreaminMachine
Oct 8th, 2009, 07:22 AM
IMO is when I can feel transfer on the surface or at least see it. I have trees on my yard that can leave stuff or exhaust from the tail pipe will get on the bumper or hatch.

gainesvilledetailing
Nov 11th, 2009, 10:20 AM
I like the answer to this, most people just recommend 1-2 times a year. The whole depending on what is floating in the air approach is good. What i usually do is just do a good visual inspection and run my hands over the finish while washing it. I usually can tell by the way my hand glides when it needs claying done to the finish

speed3blackmica
Nov 11th, 2009, 10:36 AM
Mike, i'd really appreciate your input on this question....if i took a spray bottle..filled it up with water and added a meguiars car wash such as gold class to the bottle and make it the proper water:soap ratio..can i use that as lubrication for claying ? buying quick detailer all the time can get expensive..people have been telling me that i cannot use a car wash solution because it wont lubricate as well as quick detailer and that the car wash will in due time break down the clay and make it useless...but from my point of view, isnt one of the great purposes of quality car washes such as gold class shampoo to offer superior lubricity ? so shouldnt using gold class car wash be a great substitute as lubrication for claying..you get what i mean ? i just need a professionals answer for this..clay bars i get from a friend who owns a detialing shop and he always gives me bars of clay. but i just dont want to have to keep buying quick detailer if i could use my own solution of clean water and a meguiars car wash.

THERAPY
Nov 11th, 2009, 10:50 AM
i am use the Gold Class Shampoo and water with Meguiar`s clay. i like... in Moscow the bottle of Quick Detailer coast near 400 rubles-it expensive

speed3blackmica
Nov 11th, 2009, 10:57 AM
and has ur clay bar become useless much sooner ? i just cant see how it will degrade the clay..its clay. its soap. and its water..not WD-40 and GOOF OFF..thx for ur input

Calais
Nov 11th, 2009, 11:00 AM
Mike, i'd really appreciate your input on this question....if i took a spray bottle..filled it up with water and added a meguiars car wash such as gold class to the bottle and make it the proper water:soap ratio..can i use that as lubrication for claying ? buying quick detailer all the time can get expensive..people have been telling me that i cannot use a car wash solution because it wont lubricate as well as quick detailer and that the car wash will in due time break down the clay and make it useless...but from my point of view, isnt one of the great purposes of quality car washes such as gold class shampoo to offer superior lubricity ? so shouldnt using gold class car wash be a great substitute as lubrication for claying..you get what i mean ? i just need a professionals answer for this..clay bars i get from a friend who owns a detialing shop and he always gives me bars of clay. but i just dont want to have to keep buying quick detailer if i could use my own solution of clean water and a meguiars car wash.

I've used Gold Class and water as lubrication many times to clay cars, it has enough lubrication and works just fine; however, he two problems you will encounter with wash soap that you will not with QD are the following: the clay will break down and you cannot let the soap dry on the car.

Although the clay will break down, you can probably get all the claying you need done in the time it takes for that to happen. Also, if you use small pieces at a time, it won't matter if it breaks down; you can just slice another piece.

The soap drying on the car is the main reason that I generally do not use soap as lube anymore. It is difficult to keep the surface wet, keep from dripping soap all over panels (and letting it dry) and then do an extra-extensive rinse at the end to make sure all the soap is gone.

A cheaper alternative would to buy a gallon of Last Touch. You can use it at 1:1 for clay lube and full strength for a good QD. I use it at 1:1 for both, though that is not recommended by Meguiar's.

THERAPY
Nov 11th, 2009, 11:03 AM
but the finish result better with Detailer. IMHO

speed3blackmica
Nov 11th, 2009, 11:04 AM
well i have a foam gun so that helps a lot with keeping the surface wet with soap/water wix...as im claying im pull the trigger on my hose and make sure i constantly have a panel lubricated well as i do it..and then i rinse off when that panels done...anyway so you say the car wash will breakdown the clay ? how long does this take before it breaks it down ? basically i mean is the clay only good for one full clay job if i use car wash soap with water as lubrication ?

Cindy Sable
Dec 3rd, 2009, 04:29 AM
it depends on the condition of the paintwork of your car, if it is in bad condition all the polishing in the world isnt going to bring it back. if the paintwork is in good condition a polish should last about 6 months. if your car spends most of its time undercover you could possibly get 8-10 months out of a polish. have a look at the car when u wash it. if the water is still beading, the polish is still fine.:hotrod2

Michael Stoops
Dec 3rd, 2009, 07:56 AM
Mike, i'd really appreciate your input on this question....if i took a spray bottle..filled it up with water and added a meguiars car wash such as gold class to the bottle and make it the proper water:soap ratio..can i use that as lubrication for claying ? buying quick detailer all the time can get expensive..people have been telling me that i cannot use a car wash solution because it wont lubricate as well as quick detailer and that the car wash will in due time break down the clay and make it useless...but from my point of view, isnt one of the great purposes of quality car washes such as gold class shampoo to offer superior lubricity ? so shouldnt using gold class car wash be a great substitute as lubrication for claying..you get what i mean ? i just need a professionals answer for this..clay bars i get from a friend who owns a detialing shop and he always gives me bars of clay. but i just dont want to have to keep buying quick detailer if i could use my own solution of clean water and a meguiars car wash.Apologies for not catching this sooner.

Our recommendation for clay lube is either Quik Detailer or Last Touch diluted 1:1 with water. Having said that, a lot of people have used a mild soapy water solution with little or no issue but soap can, over time, cause clay to break down. That doesn't mean it will always happen, it just means that our recommendation for optimum, consistent results is to use the products mentioned.

Potential downsides to using a soapy water solution:

Not enough soap may mean not enough lubricity
Too much soap may mean too much lubricity
You'll likely need to wash the car again after claying with a soap solution - not always, but probably


Keep in mind we aren't saying "you MUST do it this way or your paint will fall off" or some other such nonsense - it's just our recommendation for optimum, predictable results. By the same token, if someone is using a product different than we recommend, or using a technique that varies from what we teach, and they're getting good results and are happy with those results, it's really hard for us to say that's wrong. We will jump in and be pretty vocal if we think someone is doing something that has a high probability of causing damage.

EPHIOS
Jan 7th, 2010, 09:23 PM
I always do the bag test every other month, to determine if I need to clay. For me, there is no point of cleaning, polishing and waxing my paint, if the surface is not near smooth perfect. I will be just wasting my time.

DiModaCorse
May 19th, 2010, 09:48 PM
I recently took in an '04 Mazda 3 sedan (never garaged and rarely washed) in need of a comprehensive detailing. I started with Pro Car Wash 62 Shampoo & Conditioner and then proceeded with Pro-Line Mild (blue) clay due to the large amount of surface contaminants. I was very satisfied with the results using Final Inspection as a lubricant and in the end used a full 16 oz bottle while claying the entire car.

My question is if it's acceptable to also dilute Final Inspection with water for claying as well?

Murr1525
May 20th, 2010, 04:08 AM
Not reallty, FI is pretty ready to use.

DiModaCorse
May 20th, 2010, 08:54 AM
Thank you. The results were there so why mess with a good thing.

Murr1525
May 20th, 2010, 11:08 AM
Well, Last Touch is fine also, and meant for diluting, so can awlays switch over sometime.

DiModaCorse
May 20th, 2010, 02:12 PM
I still have just under a gallon of Final Inspection on hand though I like the cost benefit of Last Touch for this purpose so may add that to the inventory as well.

Thanks again.

Bill Davidson
Jul 6th, 2010, 06:52 AM
Can somebody explain why to clay in more detail

from a maintenance prospective:

If the above surface bonded contaminants remain stuck, wash after wash, can't they just remain? Are they damaging the paint in any way by staying?

If you don't power polish/abrasively clean your vehicle (you only wash and wax). The chances of removing those bonded contaminants and working them into the paint are pretty slim as well, yes/no?

from a visual perspective:

Are millions of tiny bonded surface contaminants actually blocking your eye from seeing the paint. You can still see the paint, just not as well. Kind of like looking through a dirty window.

Or is a case, that the contaminants are not allowing light to refract in one direction, it's bouncing light all over the place, reducing a mirror like shine?

perhaps it's both.

comments...

FinalTouchDetail
Jul 6th, 2010, 07:41 AM
Visually it makes a huge difference removing the bonded contaminants even before you apply any sort of LSP.

Taking the car from washed to washed and clayed is noticeable. The paint appears richer and deeper.

I would also have to believe that any LSP has a harder time bonding to a contaminated surface rather than a clean surface.

Murr1525
Jul 6th, 2010, 08:01 AM
from a maintenance prospective:

If the above surface bonded contaminants remain stuck, wash after wash, can't they just remain? Are they damaging the paint in any way by staying?

If you don't power polish/abrasively clean your vehicle (you only wash and wax). The chances of removing those bonded contaminants and working them into the paint are pretty slim as well, yes/no?

Some of it depends what the contaminant is. Something that is metallic and could rust/stain the paint, or maybe acidic that will etch the paint more deeply as time goes on would cause more of a hassle than just claying regularly.

As far as would they break loose and be dragged around... maybe, probably slim, but still a chance.



from a visual perspective:

Are millions of tiny bonded surface contaminants actually blocking your eye from seeing the paint. You can still see the paint, just not as well. Kind of like looking through a dirty window.

Or is a case, that the contaminants are not allowing light to refract in one direction, it's bouncing light all over the place, reducing a mirror like shine?

perhaps it's both.

comments...


Definitely looks and feels better....

rocky77
Oct 20th, 2012, 08:03 PM
i am use the Gold Class Shampoo and water with Meguiar`s clay. i like... in Moscow the bottle of Quick Detailer coast near 400 rubles-it expensive

ffboy
Nov 12th, 2012, 03:22 AM
Claying is good, even if done a bit more frequently. Depends on the environment, one may need it done more frequently if the environment is poor. It would be better for paint than allowing the contaminants to accumulate, and it does add more clarity, brightness or depth, allows for easier application and removal of cleaners, polish.glaze and wax but to me the biggest difference is in the slickness of the paint given by the extra claying step

manroger4
Jan 22nd, 2013, 06:21 PM
Thanks for sharing this interesting information.I paid little attention to this in everyday life.Since I had to worry for.

dragontail
Jan 31st, 2013, 02:45 AM
I use to do it twice a month, it was my friend’s advice

Murr1525
Jan 31st, 2013, 06:16 AM
I use to do it twice a month, it was my friend’s advice

Twice a month is probably more than needed, unless in an area with lots of fallout landing on the car.

ffboy
Jan 31st, 2013, 03:08 PM
Too frequent... Once every couple of months is OK, but twice a month is just a bit too frequent. Again, it will depend on the environment, sometimes you can get away with using a body solvent or mild mineral spirit type of cleaner for those stubborn spots.

The Driver
Feb 8th, 2013, 05:30 AM
Unless your traveling 1000+ miles a month, thats to much. Also your chance of marring the paint are much greater.

Bluediamond
Feb 12th, 2013, 04:20 AM
Claying is non-abrasive to the finish. So you can clay as often .

NikhilV8889
Oct 9th, 2013, 08:18 PM
Claying is non-abrasive to the finish. So you can clay as often .If it's often, always use a low-agressive clay and use lots of lubes. And again, I would like to read 'often' as every 4-6 months :-)

billddrummer
Mar 1st, 2014, 11:10 AM
As I've posted elsewhere in this forum, I have multiple environmental issues which will require me to clay at least twice/month, if not more frequently.

These are the environmental issues I deal with:



My DD is parked outdoors 100% of the time (covered at my apartment but open at work)
I drive 600+ miles/week on interstate highways through sagebrush/mixed conifer forest;
At work, park in the open in a pine forest, subject to tree sap, pollen and bird droppings;
Office complex at work is wooden, and painters spay varnish to protect the wood, making the car susceptible to overspray (great example at the beginning of this thread!);
Winter driving includes being subjected to road salt, sand and splashover from passing vehicles;
Summer driving exposes car to road dust, grease and high winds, which carry additional contaminants.


To keep the car looking good, I see that I will need to clay much more frequently than many of you.

This time I polished and followed up with wax. Depending on the condition of the finish after claying, I'll either need to up the aggressiveness of the polishing compound or recognize that a mirror like finish will be virtually impossible.

I'm willing to put in the work, but could definitely see investing in a DA orbiter shortly.

And following with the comment from our friend in Russia: Is there a bulk size QD (gallon or larger) which consumers can order? I could definitely benefit.

Thanks for reading.

bdd

Eldorado2k
Mar 1st, 2014, 12:41 PM
@Bill. Just curious, are you doing a baggie test to feel your finish after washing/drying your vehicle? Or how do you determine it's about time to clay?

billddrummer
Mar 1st, 2014, 04:50 PM
@Bill. Just curious, are you doing a baggie test to feel your finish after washing/drying your vehicle? Or how do you determine it's about time to clay?
No baggie test. I got a recommendation from the manager of the local AutoZone store to rub my fingers over the surface and see if it felt sticky.

It did, so I did. I couldn't see the contamination, but I could definitely feel it.

I'll have to check weekly to see how it holds up.

I do have a follow on question though: If I clay again soon, do I need to rewax afterward?

The Guz
Mar 1st, 2014, 05:45 PM
I would trust the information on here rather than autozone employee who is not as knowledgeable. The baggie test is a great way to determine if you need to clay. I could see you claying 2 maybe 3 times a year. You should definitely be using ultimate wax. Although due to the harsh environment your vehicle goes through, you may want to invest in a permanent coating. Anytime you clay you want to follow up with a wax or sealant.

Eldorado2k
Mar 1st, 2014, 05:46 PM
Yes Sir. You will have to re wax after using the claybar as it not only removes contaminents but also removes any existing layers of wax.

You should try the baggie test for yourself though, it sure can't hurt to see if it helps your sense of touch. I personaly am not very good at being able to touch for contaminents without a plastic baggie.. Some people, like Senor Stoops seem to have the natural smooth touch. But next time, after you wash & dry your car try a baggie test on a panel, then walk over to another car and feel the differences for yourself to get an idea of what you're working with. :good day

billddrummer
Mar 1st, 2014, 07:54 PM
Yes Sir. You will have to re wax after using the claybar as it not only removes contaminents but also removes any existing layers of wax.

You should try the baggie test for yourself though, it sure can't hurt to see if it helps your sense of touch. I personaly am not very good at being able to touch for contaminents without a plastic baggie.. Some people, like Senor Stoops seem to have the natural smooth touch. But next time, after you wash & dry your car try a baggie test on a panel, then walk over to another car and feel the differences for yourself to get an idea of what you're working with. :good day

Thanks for all your help with this--clearly, I hadn't ever clayed any vehicle prior to this one, so all suggestions/tips are appreciated.

And I have an extremely sensitive touch, but will try the baggie test next time.

The AutoZone employee suggested claying the vehicle followed with wax. I decided to apply polish.

Eldorado2k
Mar 1st, 2014, 09:36 PM
Hey it's great to be able to help in any way:]
It reminds me of the words that Barry Meguiar wrote as the foreword to the Meguiars catolog they were nice enough to give us at the detailing 101 Sat. class the other day...
He basicly said what makes this hobby of ours great is the common interest that's shared and seems to naturally attract inherently good people that can easily form a common bond based on the universal passion we have for our cars. Aka the OCD.
And best of all, the make, model, price or whatever is not what matters in this genre of car interest. It's built on our appreciation of how much work[the fun kind of work] and perseverance that's required to take ANY car to show car status!

That's the cliffnotes of what he said... But when I 1st read it, I thought to myself, this guy is so cool because he Totally gets it!

And that's why people can find communicating somewhat "easy" among ourselves. Because not only are we car guys [as Barry calls us] But we're Meguiars kind of people.. And if you know what I mean, you know it's all about providing a helping hand to good people.

I had the honor to speak to Barry Meguiar and shake hands & exchange my appreciation for making this hobby such an ideal experience like only a limited few companies accross all avenues of life are generous enough to provide for it's consumers. It's the sort of stuff that Has to come from the heart! It cannot be faked. And talking to Barry, even for just a few minutes, the dude is the real deal true classy gentleman, without a doubt.

Cheers!

billddrummer
Mar 10th, 2014, 09:15 PM
Yes Sir. You will have to re wax after using the claybar as it not only removes contaminents but also removes any existing layers of wax.

You should try the baggie test for yourself though, it sure can't hurt to see if it helps your sense of touch. I personaly am not very good at being able to touch for contaminents without a plastic baggie.. Some people, like Senor Stoops seem to have the natural smooth touch. But next time, after you wash & dry your car try a baggie test on a panel, then walk over to another car and feel the differences for yourself to get an idea of what you're working with. :good day

Appreciate the additional info. This past Saturday I washed, clayed, polished and waxed (least aggressive clay, Ultimate Polish, Ultimate Carnuaba Wax).

Monday it snowed.

And I noticed black flecks on the front bumper and hood. (Thinking it is cast off rubber from a semi-truck.)

I may be claying again this weekend.

Eldorado2k
Mar 15th, 2014, 05:29 AM
Dang that's unfortunate when something like that happens just after getting it so spotless. It didn't come off after just a wash?

billddrummer
Mar 15th, 2014, 01:20 PM
Dang that's unfortunate when something like that happens just after getting it so spotless. It didn't come off after just a wash?

Thanks.

The timing of it was that the snow and black flecks appeared on the same day--two days after the wash, clay, polish, wax routine.

QD took the flecks off with no problem the day after I noticed them.

Now, I have discovered a touchless car wash within a mile of my apartment, so I'll be using it from now on (and I think the cute girl I mentioned in another thread quit, taking away the last 'reason' to keep beating up my car).

Touchless is much cheaper too, and the wash takes Visa cards! (No need to bust out my pants pockets with all those quarters!)

I picked up some SwirlX to take care of the swirl marks--since the car is only a few months old, I didn't think a more aggressive treatment would be appropriate.

DA orbiter on the shopping list for next time.

Now, if I had been taking it weekly for a year, then 205 would have been my first choice.

Here is a question for the group:

Several people have mentioned stronger chemicals used at touchless wash facilities.

I would prefer not to use a sealant--does that mean I'll need to wax after each wash?

Appreciate this forum and all the collective knowledge here!


bdd

hadleywalters
Feb 18th, 2016, 10:15 PM
Do it as often as you like. As long as the claying doesn't start etching the paint. It's yur baby, no amount of care will be enough (http://www.autogeek.net/detailing-clay-bar.html).

PeterK1
Jun 20th, 2016, 11:51 PM
Simple solution to check the cars I do to see if they need claying. Check it with the back of your hand. If it feels sandy, it needs claying

carl292
Sep 2nd, 2017, 08:24 AM
I like to clay mine every 2 yrs. You feel the difference

rodder98
Nov 20th, 2017, 03:58 PM
I put my fingers into a plastic sandwich baggie, and then lightly move my fingers across the paint, after washing it. The baggie magnifies the "bumps" and will let you know it the vehicle needs clay baring.