PDA

View Full Version : what speed for #83 dACp do u use ?



tumbler
Nov 22nd, 2005, 08:57 AM
I'm have great sucess with #83 DACP with my rotary at speed 1400 and 1500 :xyxthumbs

of course i'm working in small areas and the swirls are gone in seconds..

Is there an optimal speed that #83 DACP breakdowns the best ?

anyone else care to share ?

Tim Lingor
Nov 22nd, 2005, 02:13 PM
Hey,

I prefer using #83 DACP with a W-8006 Polishing Pad spinning ~ 1700 rpm. I by far get the best results with that combo and speed. But you must be careful as running a rotary at that speed can add more risk as well.

I should point out however, that Meguiar's suggests the maximum speed to be ~ 1500 RPM.

Tim

probegt
Nov 22nd, 2005, 02:23 PM
I like running about 1400 with a polishing pad. Faster just isnt better for me with DACP. That is usually my set speed for all polishes for me though.

Buellwinkle
Nov 22nd, 2005, 03:06 PM
Speed is relative to pad size, for example if you use an 8" pad, the outer edges of the pad are traveling at a faster speed than if you use 6" pads and I even have a 10" pad for cutting. Also, it depends on how fast you want to work, the faster the speed the less room for error so with the right pad and right speed you can cut through the clear cut in seconds. I tend to run the slowest speed on my Makita which is about 1,300 rpm with a 6" pad. If that doesn't work I kick it up a notch to the second setting. It's always best to start off with the least aggresive setup and work your way up than to have to re-clearcoat.

Also consider that #83 is a diminishing abbrasive which breaks down quickly at higher speeds so you don't have as much work time and you generate more heat so the product dries quicker.

Tim Lingor
Nov 22nd, 2005, 03:15 PM
Originally posted by Buellwinkle
Also, it depends on how fast you want to work, the faster the speed the less room for error so with the right pad and right speed you can cut through the clear cut in seconds.

Very good point! While I have used a rotary for over 16 years, the faster the speed, the margin of error becomes a major factor. In the beginning, it would be advised to use caution and a lower rpm. It is easy to burn paint or place difficult to remove holograms in to the paint.

Tim

tumbler
Nov 22nd, 2005, 03:16 PM
I'm using a 7.5" orange or yellow constant pressure pad

I don't know what technique you all employ either , but as late i'm able to prep my suv pretty quickly.

I start by drawing my spaghetti lines of dacp on the 1st half of driver hood, left front fender, driver door, rear passenger door. Fire up my rotary and do those sections as mentioned above, then come up for air :D

Then do the lower end of driver and rear passenger door. Then do the exact same thing starting for the other half of the passenger side hood.

Takes me no time at all at 1400

:xyxthumbs

Buellwinkle
Nov 22nd, 2005, 03:28 PM
Forgot to mention one huge downside of spinning faster, you get more splatter. I know they have concave pads to minimize it but it's hard to fight centrifugal force, it wants to move the product from the center out and on your clothese, tires, floor and such.

zey
Dec 4th, 2005, 09:52 PM
As a beginner, I apply M83 at speed 600 ~ 900rpm. On edges and tight corners, I will not go beyond 600rpm. However, it's not so efficient and requires more time and passes to work with.

wetlook
Dec 8th, 2005, 03:47 PM
Originally posted by zey
As a beginner, I apply M83 at speed 600 ~ 900rpm. On edges and tight corners, I will not go beyond 600rpm. However, it's not so efficient and requires more time and passes to work with.

Almost the same here! Sometimes venture to the 1200rpm mark. :D

aka mr. clean
Mar 7th, 2006, 07:14 PM
Originally posted by zey
As a beginner, I apply M83 at speed 600 ~ 900rpm. On edges and tight corners, I will not go beyond 600rpm. However, it's not so efficient and requires more time and passes to work with.

Resurrecting an older thread to ask... Is 600-900 sufficient to break down M83 properly?

zey
Mar 8th, 2006, 12:09 AM
Hi aka mr. clean, I think it's possible. Just try to work on smaller areas and buff slightly longer to almost clear finish will do.