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GreyWolf
May 3rd, 2004, 05:16 PM
I was wandering what the main difference is in these 2 products. I went into the local body shop tonight that sells alot of Meguiars products in my area to get some #9, #81,#20,NXT,#16 for the upcomming combo I am going to use.

The guy at the counter (never seen him there before) said that he would just use the MPPP and #16 and skip the #9 and #81 becuase they contain alot of oils and fillers and would just hide what I wanted to get rid and it would prevent bonding and it would be the same case for the #20 and topping either with NXT wouldnt do anything. So I decided to come here and get the answers before going back.

What is the difference between MPPP and #20?
Was his therory on the bonding true?

rusty bumper
May 3rd, 2004, 11:34 PM
Originally posted by GreyWolf
I was wandering what the main difference is in these 2 products. I went into the local body shop tonight that sells alot of Meguiars products in my area to get some #9, #81,#20,NXT,#16 for the upcomming combo I am going to use.

The guy at the counter (never seen him there before) said that he would just use the MPPP and #16 and skip the #9 and #81 becuase they contain alot of oils and fillers and would just hide what I wanted to get rid and it would prevent bonding and it would be the same case for the #20 and topping either with NXT wouldnt do anything. So I decided to come here and get the answers before going back.

What is the difference between MPPP and #20?
Was his therory on the bonding true?

Both #20 & MPPP are long lasting products, but all I remember about them is that they are blended polymers.

I personally think the bonding issues are overblown about applying a wax over one of Meguiar's polishes...If you are concerned about it, maybe you could wipe down the finish with Final Inspection after using a polish.

Mosca
May 4th, 2004, 04:53 AM
If #9 or #81 prevented bonding then they would have no purpose; why apply a product that does that? Yes, both contain oils and fillers. They look pretty good! When you can't get all the swirls, it certainly doesn't hurt to fill them, and it looks pretty good, so, what's the problem?

All I know about the products mentioned is how they look and how easy they are to use, I only know about their durability secondhand.

They go on about the same, #20 comes off easier. #20 is shinier, MPPP is darker and still pretty shiny.

I like both a lot, MPPP fits my cars and purposes better.


Tom

Tim Lingor
May 4th, 2004, 05:28 AM
Hey,

I agree with what the others have said.

I personally prefer the look of #20 topped with #26. Though I do like MPPP on light colored paints a little more.

Meguiar's products are designed to work as a system. I have been applying #20 over #9 and #81 (or #7) for years without a problem. In other words, I would not worry about it!! :)


Tim

majik1
May 7th, 2004, 04:15 AM
ditto....

RamAirV1
May 9th, 2004, 03:02 PM
#20 has cleaners and polishes in it. MPPP appears to have more polishing oils in it. There has been some debate over whether MPPP has cleaners in it. I don't notice any cleaning action in it but others have.

#20 is easier to apply and remove and will dry fast at colder temperatures than MPPP will. Below 50° MPPP can take a very long time to dry and will streak if you try to wipe it off too soon. Heat and humidity do not cause any application or removal problems.

I prefer MPPP and it was Meguiars most durable sealant until NXT came along, according to Meguiars. I did try #26 over #20 and have to say that it looked great too and is easier to work with than MPPP. You can't go wrong with either one.

I have used MPPP over #81 and there were no bonding problems at all. Meguiars polishes and waxes were designed to work as a system.

If you have dark colored paint, I highly recommmend using the #81 prior to applying a Meguiars wax or sealant.

RamAirV1

rusty bumper
May 9th, 2004, 07:45 PM
Below 50° MPPP can take a very long time to dry and will streak if you try to wipe it off too soon. Heat and humidity do not cause any application or removal problems.
I don't know why, but MPPP seems to take a long time to dry when I use it...I apply it with a PC.
If you have dark colored paint, I highly recommmend using the #81 prior to applying a Meguiars wax or sealant.
I agree....I tried #81 this week and it really adds something extra to the finish.

Tim Lingor
May 9th, 2004, 08:38 PM
Hey Beginner2002

The best tips? Sure....

When applying Meguiar's #9 Swirl Remover, be sure to work it in thoroughly but remove it while still damp. Use a foam applicator to apply and a quality MF towel to remove.

Then, apply the #20 to the whole car. Allow 10-15 minutes, do the swipe test (take your finger and swipe it across the surface. If the product comes off without smearing or grabbing, it is time to remove). Then remove with a clean MF. Now, leave the car over night to allow the #20 to set-up.

Then apply the #26 to the whole car. Once applied go back over removing it with a MF , again following the swipe test.

Then stand back and admire the deep gloss to the paint! :xyxthumbs

I look forward in seeing the completed car!

Tim

rjstaaf
May 10th, 2004, 11:21 AM
I think MPPP and #20 look a lot alike but, MPPP seems a bit more durable. The main difference that is important to me is that MPPP will stain your trim (taping would be a good idea) whereas #20 does not dry white. #20 is also a bit easier to remove than MPPP. My preference would be for #20. For me the ease of use outweighs and slight difference in durability. They are both great products. I use MPPP on my wheels every 5K miles when I rotate them and I find it to be very durable.