Are you concerned about hard water spots when washing and drying your vehicle?

View Poll Results: Are you concerned about hard water spots when washing and drying your vehicle?

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    498 83.70%
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Thread: Are you concerned about hard water spots when washing and drying your vehicle?

          
  1. #1
    Registered Member Mike Phillips's Avatar
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    Are you concerned about hard water spots when washing and drying your vehicle?

    We would appreciate your feedback, comments and suggestions on the topic or washing your car.

    Thank you for participating in our poll!


    Question 1

    Are you concerned about hard water spots on your paint when washing and drying your vehicle?
    Mike Phillips
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  2. #2
    Registered Member RamAirV1's Avatar
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    Hard water spots are one of the most difficult things to remove from paint. It is best to avoid them, rather than remove them.

    I also go out of my way to avoid sprinkers that recklessly spray water into the street and onto cars. This is one thing that really makes me mad!

    RamAirV1

  3. #3
    Registered Member Rick's Avatar
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    RamAirV1,

    I totally agree with ya. I even threw my car in to a full panic skid once and stopped traffic to prevent having to drive under water spraying on to the road from a broken sprinkler head once. Of course our Phoenix water is some of the harder water around too.
    Later,
    Ricky

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  4. #4
    Registered Member Unreal's Avatar
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    Yes I am.

    I battle this constantly and have found that the NXT wash does help out alot in this.

  5. #5
    Registered Member Rockpick's Avatar
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    Our water here is pretty hard and contains copius amounts of calcium. It's an UPHILL battle to stay ahead of the game with a black vehicle.

    I've explored filtration/softening systems. They're just so pricey...

    RP

  6. #6
    Registered Member RamAirV1's Avatar
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    I just had the faucet in the garage hooked up to the house water softener. It makes a big difference.

    RamAirV1

  7. #7
    Registered Member Aurora40's Avatar
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    I'm concerned in the sense that I don't want hard water spots on my car. But I don't struggle with it. I think maybe it's technique combined with pretty decent water.

    If you are asking because Meg's is considering a de-ionized rinse, can I suggest a couple things that would be key to me?

    One is for the filter to have decent capacity (would be nice to be able to use it for a whole wash if I wanted, not just final rinsing, and if used for just final rinsing, you shouldn't have to totally chintz out and make just one "optimum" pass in order to have enough filtering to rinse 2-3 cars. I should be able to rinse generously, overlapping on parts, maybe rinsing twice, etc, and still do 5 or more cars, IMO.

    The other is to include some kind of nozzle. I've toyed with the notion of a DI filter for a while now, and probably the one biggest factor is that I feel it will have very low water flow, and that with my Ultimate Nozzle, or most hose nozzles, it will just piddle out the end and not actually spray very well.

    A bypass on the filter, and perhaps a nozzle with two modes, big flow unfiltered, and small flow filtered spray, would also be nice, though I'd probably just use the Ultimate Nozzle and then screw on whichever filtered nozzle it had, as the Ultimate Nozzle is pretty ultimate...
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  8. #8
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    I wash cars commercially and we use DI water all of the time. It does not have to be ridiculously expensive and you can use a set up in the garage. You just need to find a supplier for it. Culligan and Ionics are both decent suppliers for DI water systems. You just have to negotiate a low volume price from them, and you will be good to go.

    AzScooter

  9. #9
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    Spots from hard water

    This is an easy problem to solve -- but not particularly cheap.

    Rayne Water Company (and others, I am sure) will provide a tank just like your water softener. It will turn about 1,000 gallons of water into deinonized (this is ditstilled water, not "soft" water."

    It is about $35 a month. Every once in a while you replace the canister at a cost of perhaps $40.

    Note that you do not use this water to wash your car. You use it to rinse the car. Distilled water (no minerals) has many other uses around the house: steam irons, windows, etc.

    Damon Swank

  10. #10
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    Deionized and distilled water are totally different.
    There are three types of ultra pure water. I hope to explain the difference so that it is clear.
    DI or Deionized water is passed through a resin bed to neutralize the electrical charge of any ions or metals that it contains. When this happens water cannot conduct electricity. In order to do this there are tow types of resin beds that can be used. teh first is what is called a CA bed. You have two tanks and one removes or neutralizes the cations and the other removes the anions. The other is mixed bed, and actually has the cation and anion resins mixed together. The final product is water that has lost it's ability to conduct electricity because of the neutralized metal elements in the water. Think of a magnet that has been demagnetized. This is usually the choice of mobile detailers because the size of the tanks lend themselves to portability and let you process water on site. INteresting trivia, the Intel plant in Chandler, Arizona purifies the water they use after the manufacturing process in a huge DI plant, and then injects back into the underground aquifer. This was one of the conditions of them being able to build the plant.

    RO water is microfiltered, usually through a ceramic filter. This totally removes the metal particles or bad things that cause water hardness by filtration. It also removes chemicals that might be in the water that you drink, such as Chlorine, etc. This method can be a little cheaper than DI water because of the filtration process, although both of them run 5 to 10 cents a gallon to process the water. Of course this all depends on the are that you live in. If you are in a hard water area, such as the desert southwest, or Alaska or somewhere else where the city id very dependent on under ground aquifers for drinking water it will be more expensive. If they depend on lakes and rivers for drinking water then it is a little less expensive. For a professional detailer, all of the water would have to be processed at their home or office and transported via tank.

    Disitlled water is actually done through a distillation process. That means the water is actually boiled and the steam is recaptured and chilled to make it water. This leaves all of the metal particles behind in the hot tank and ideally leaves pure water behind. This is probably the most ponderous method to purify water. It is also probably the least pure method of the three, and the most ponderous for our uses.

    Now to give you an idea of the levels of purity...
    In the manufacturing process for electronics, they use DI water. It is the most pure and thus the most useful, because tehre is no chance of residues being left behind.
    For Soda pop and such, it is typically RO water. This will remove any impurities that might change the taste of what you are thinking.
    Distilled is the oldest technology, and also the slowest. I cannot think right off hand of any industrial uses of distliied water, although I know that my mom used to use distilled water in her iron in the '60's to make it last longer, because the RO technonllgy and DI technology were not fully developped.

    And there I go, I probably made it as clear as mud. This is something that I have been dealing with on a daily basis for nearly twenty years now.

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