Damage caused by UV radiaition
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21

Thread: Damage caused by UV radiaition

          
  1. #1
    Star Kicker TOGWT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Age
    74
    Posts
    571
    Rep Power
    24

    Damage caused by UV radiaition

    Ultra violet Radiation is known to contribute to the chemical modification of exposed paint surfaces resulting in loss of gloss, colour change, chalking, flaking and eventually destruction of the clear coat paint film by oxidation. Ultra violet protection is a sacrificial / renewable component; this is due to the UV protection layer (stabilizers) being degraded by exposure to the elements (sun, sand, road or sea salt, and etc) it is also water miscible, so it is imperative that you renew it and needs to be re-applied on a regular basis (dependent upon location climatic condition)

    There is no such thing as a permanent UV stabilizer, it a matter of physics, not chemistry. Ultra violet protection is a sacrificial and necessarily renewable protection. Acrylic polymers and polyurethane polymer are slow to absorb UV light and accordingly somewhat resistant to photo degradation.

    Many natural and synthetic materials are attacked by ultra-violet radiation and products made using these materials may crack or disintegrate. This problem is known as ultra violet degradation, and is a common problem in products exposed to sunlight.

    1. UV-A radiation dries out the binder system causing structural failure; it will dry the resin in paint; leading to oxidation. A paint surface will often show cracking as the resin binder dries out the paint draws up on itself forming ‘crow’s feet’. It will also dry out the oils and plasticizers in vinyl and other materials and may lead to structural damage (this is especially relevant to open top convertibles)

    2. UV-B radiation exposure leads to gloss and colour instability (photosynthesis or photo-oxidation) and surface fading stains. But before UV light can cause harm, it must first be absorbed. If it is not turned into heat or transferred to a nearby stabilizer molecule called a quencher, it breaks weak chemical bonds. This is the beginning of UV damage. Some materials absorb UV radiation more readily than other materials. Materials that readily absorb (UV-B) radiation are quickly damaged...rubber, vinyls, gel coat fibreglass, and many other plastics.

    When radiation is absorbed, it starts to break (cleave) weak chemical bonds, which leads to photochemical degradation (bleaching, (fading), discoloration, chalking, brittleness and cracking) all indications of UV deterioration. The bond cleavages resulting from UV absorption cause the formation of “radicals.” Each free radical can trigger a chain of reactions (in the presence of air), leading to more bond cleavages and destruction. These oxidising chain reactions require no further UV exposure, just the presence of air

    The clear coat provides gloss plus physical protection from the elements, including ultraviolet (UV) radiation, which is in the upper 1.0 – 1. 25µ layer of the clear coat paint.. Removing more that 12.5µ (0.5 mil) of clear coat will precipitate premature paint film failure as the ultra violet (UV) protection percolates to the top of the clear coat, there is ultra violet (UV) protection all the way through the paint, but the majority of it migrates to the top of the clear coat along with the thinner solvents and particles.

    Therefore removing clear coat ultra violet protection is not a linear process; by removing a small percentage of the clear coat paint tends to remove a larger percentage of UV inhibitors. So once you remove too much clear coat you'll have no paint UV protection other than what you apply with a LSP
    ~ Providing unbiased advice that Professional and Enthusiast Detailer’s Trust ~ Blog – http://togwt1980.blogspot.com

  2. #2
    Mr. greg0303's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Brooklyn New York
    Posts
    2,888
    Rep Power
    65

    Re: Damage caused by UV radiaition

    Very nice article, Jon.

    Nicely explained.

  3. #3
    Star Kicker TOGWT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Age
    74
    Posts
    571
    Rep Power
    24

    Re: Damage caused by UV radiaition

    Paint Surface Protection

    The clear coat, provides gloss plus physical protection from the elements, including ultraviolet (UV) radiation, which is in the upper 1.0 – 1. 25µ layer of the clear coat paint.. Removing more that 12.5µ (0.5 mil) of clear coat will precipitate premature paint film failure as the ultra violet (UV) protection percolates to the top of the clear coat, there is ultra violet (UV) protection all the way through the paint, but the majority of it migrates to the top of the clear coat along with the thinner solvents and particles.
    Dependent on reflective value of the paint colour; surface reflection will provide some UV radiation protection along with some sacrificial protection as the wax or polymers oxidize

    Therefore removing clear coat ultra violet protection is not a linear process; by removing a small percentage of the clear coat paint tends to remove a larger percentage of UV inhibitors. So once you remove too much clear coat you'll have no paint UV protection other than what you apply with a LSP.

    An organic wax, contrary to popular opinion, or marketing, does not contain natural UV protection; the wax protects the leaves due to its thickness and the fact that it’s opaque. It does however provide a sacrificial surface that will resist acid (salt brine, bird excrement, acidic rain, etc) better than a polymer, which forms a molecular bond with the paint, whereas a an organic wax forms a semi-hard protective shell (although it lacks durability)

    Polymer sealants are somewhat resistant to UV-B radiation as they oxidize, they also offer durable protection

    • Nanotechnology coatings due to something called the Lotus effect offer resistance to dirt as they do not allow adhesion, they are also scratch resistant.
    ~ Providing unbiased advice that Professional and Enthusiast Detailer’s Trust ~ Blog – http://togwt1980.blogspot.com

  4. #4
    Registered Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bath Pa
    Posts
    7
    Rep Power
    8

    Re: Damage caused by UV radiaition

    I dig that . I had bird stains go right thru 2 coats of UW and 1 of 1Z wax . Topped the truck with Pinnacle Sig Series 2 now.

    Excellant post

  5. #5
    Who? Me? the other pc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    2,297
    Rep Power
    40

    Cool Re: Damage caused by UV radiaition

    ... The bond cleavages resulting from UV absorption cause the formation of “radicals.” Each free radical can trigger a chain of reactions (in the presence of air), leading to more bond cleavages and destruction. ...
    Always been a big fan of Bond cleavage and destruction, especially Sophie Marceau. Oh, and Halle Berry,... and Michelle Yeoh, and of course Diana Rigg, and.....

  6. #6
    Global Product & Training Spec Michael Stoops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Trabuco Canyon, CA
    Posts
    21,371
    Rep Power
    1136

    Re: Damage caused by UV radiaition

    Quote Originally Posted by TOGWT View Post

    An organic wax, contrary to popular opinion, or marketing, does not contain natural UV protection; the wax protects the leaves due to its thickness and the fact that it’s opaque. It does however provide a sacrificial surface that will resist acid (salt brine, bird excrement, acidic rain, etc) better than a polymer, which forms a molecular bond with the paint, whereas a an organic wax forms a semi-hard protective shell (although it lacks durability)
    Care to back this up with any sort of citation?

    The characteristics of carnauba wax that you're describing have very little bearing in the real world of carnauba car waxes. Carnauba in it's natural state, as it occurs on the leaves of the plant from which it comes, is not at all the same as the carnauba as it exists in car wax. As you know, a block of all natural carnauba is so hard as to be completely unusable as a car wax. A block of all natural carnauba is just that - a block. Knock it on a table top and it doesn't sound much different than doing the same with a rock. You certainly can't spread it out on your paint like you do with a carnauba car wax, that's for sure. The natural carnauba is refined and blended with a mix of other ingredients, some helping to solublize the carnauba, some acting simply as carrier ingredients, some are polymers that act to bind everything together and increase the durability of the "wax" being applied to the car. Nobody makes a "pure carnauba" wax in the sense of the product being nothing but carnauba. As stated, that would be an unworkable product.

    So whether carnauba in and of itself provides an UV protection is really a moot point. A carnauba wax will contain UV screeners provided by other ingredients contained in the total formulation.

    As for resistance to acid, bird droppings, etc being better with carnauba than with a polymer, we disagree as well. Carnauba waxes can be fairly easily washed off with even a mild detergent, synthetic polymers not so much. In fact, in our carnauba wax we utilize detergent resistant polymers to help with the longevity of the wax, to prevent it from simply being washed away. In the long run, both carnauba waxes and synthetic, cross linking polymer sealants are sacrificial barriers. Both will buy you some time against all manner of things that can attack your paint, but neither is tougher than the paint itself. Both break down over time, both can be attacked and defeated by bird droppings and acid rain, among other things. But in the overall scheme of things, synthetics will provide better, and longer lasting, protection than carnauba products will. Generally speaking.

    But there's something about that look of carnauba on a dark colored car.
    Michael Stoops
    Senior Global Product & Training Specialist | Meguiar's Inc.

    Remember, this hobby is supposed to be your therapy, not the reason you need therapy.

  7. #7
    Star Kicker TOGWT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Age
    74
    Posts
    571
    Rep Power
    24

    Re: Damage caused by UV radiaition

    An organic wax, contrary to popular opinion, or marketing, does not contain natural UV protection; the wax protects the leaves due to its thickness and the fact that it’s opaque. It does however provide a sacrificial surface that will resist acid (salt brine, bird excrement, acidic rain, etc) better than a polymer, which forms a molecular bond with the paint, whereas a an organic wax forms a semi-hard protective shell (although it lacks durability)

    Care to back this up with any sort of citation?

    What kind of ‘citation’ are you looking for

    So whether carnauba in and of itself provides an UV protection is really a moot point. A carnauba wax will contain UV screeners provided by other ingredients contained in the total formulation.

    The point I’m making is that Carnauba wax and polymers do not contain a natural UV protection, UV stabilizers are specialist ingredients that offer only temporary protection that must be renewed. Many people believe that Carnauba wax protects the leaves of the Copernicia tree it has an inbuilt UV protection.

    As for resistance to acid, bird droppings, etc being better with carnauba than with a polymer, we disagree as well. Carnauba waxes can be fairly easily washed off with even a mild detergent, synthetic polymers not so much. In fact, in our carnauba wax we utilize detergent resistant polymers to help with the longevity of the wax, to prevent it from simply being washed away. In the long run, both carnauba waxes and synthetic, cross linking polymer sealants are sacrificial barriers. Both will buy you some time against all manner of things that can attack your paint, but neither is tougher than the paint itself. Both break down over time, both can be attacked and defeated by bird droppings and acid rain, among other things. But in the overall scheme of things, synthetics will provide better, and longer lasting, protection than carnauba products will. Generally speaking.

    I think we are dealing with semantics here. IMO the point of a sacrificial protection is that it should be removed when it’s been subjected to an acid attack and then renewed. Will a synthetic exhibit better durability than a wax, absolutely. The choice of what to use as a sacrificial barrier is just that, a personal choice. I like the asthetics provided by a Carnauba wax and the durability of a polymer, so my choice of sacrificial protection is wax on top of a polymer
    ~ Providing unbiased advice that Professional and Enthusiast Detailer’s Trust ~ Blog – http://togwt1980.blogspot.com

  8. #8
    Star Kicker TOGWT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Age
    74
    Posts
    571
    Rep Power
    24

    Re: Damage caused by UV radiaition

    Quote Originally Posted by greg0303 View Post
    Very nice article, Jon.

    Nicely explained.
    Thank you, always glad to help better understanding
    ~ Providing unbiased advice that Professional and Enthusiast Detailer’s Trust ~ Blog – http://togwt1980.blogspot.com

  9. #9
    Star Kicker TOGWT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Age
    74
    Posts
    571
    Rep Power
    24

    Re: Damage caused by UV radiaition

    Quote Originally Posted by Slicky View Post
    I dig that . I had bird stains go right thru 2 coats of UW and 1 of 1Z wax . Topped the truck with Pinnacle Sig Series 2 now.

    Excellant post
    Thank you
    ~ Providing unbiased advice that Professional and Enthusiast Detailer’s Trust ~ Blog – http://togwt1980.blogspot.com

  10. #10
    Star Kicker TOGWT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Age
    74
    Posts
    571
    Rep Power
    24

    Re: Damage caused by UV radiaition

    Quote Originally Posted by the other pc View Post
    Always been a big fan of Bond cleavage and destruction, especially Sophie Marceau. Oh, and Halle Berry,... and Michelle Yeoh, and of course Diana Rigg, and.....
    Some may lack cleavage (definetly not Halle Berry), but they all more than make up for it in destruction
    ~ Providing unbiased advice that Professional and Enthusiast Detailer’s Trust ~ Blog – http://togwt1980.blogspot.com

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. eCamaro - photo heavy
    By wifpd4 in forum Show Off Your Latest Detail Work
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: Mar 28th, 2011, 07:35 AM
  2. opinion needed - carwash damage
    By Cosmin in forum Detailing 101
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: Nov 22nd, 2010, 08:48 AM
  3. Can some one tell me what caused this damage?
    By nettech_gt in forum Detailing 101
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: Nov 15th, 2010, 08:09 AM
  4. What paint damage is this?
    By RZ94 in forum Detailing 101
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Jan 23rd, 2009, 01:48 PM
  5. House being tented for termites, damage caused by gas?
    By Ryan L. in forum The Break Room
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Jun 19th, 2008, 08:20 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •