Years-in-Review: Meguiar's DA Technologies & MT300 Review
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 27

Thread: Years-in-Review: Meguiar's DA Technologies & MT300 Review

          
  1. #1
    CCH Auto Appearance, LLC C. Charles Hahn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Lansing, MI
    Posts
    85
    Rep Power
    7

    Years-in-Review: Meguiar's DA Technologies & MT300 Review

    In November of 2014, Meguiar’s took the SEMA show in Las Vegas by storm with the introduction of an overhauled collection of foam and wool buffing pads and backing plates, along with their all new flagship MT300 Dual Action Polisher. By Late February of 2015, machines started shipping to customers. After using the latest DA polishing system myself in a variety of situations over the course of the past year, I have compiled a review of my impressions.

    To start, however, let’s take a brief stroll through history and look at what has brought us to this point. With some help from Senior Global Product & Training Specialist Michael Stoops to fill in the gaps (especially with products predating internet forums), what we’ve assembled here is a brief timeline of the various technologies and products introduced to the market over a period of decades that have led toward Meguiar’s pioneering of Dual Action polishing and paint correction, which has helped earn DAs a place of legitimacy in the industry.

    Table of Contents
    (Click links below to skip to a section, or scroll for the full article)


    1. Liquids (Compounds/Polishes)
    2. Pads and Backing Plates
    3. Tool History
    4. MT300 Overview, Review, and Conclusions
    Charlie
    Automotive Appearance Specialist - Serving Greater Lansing, Michigan

  2. #2
    CCH Auto Appearance, LLC C. Charles Hahn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Lansing, MI
    Posts
    85
    Rep Power
    7

    Re: Years-in-Review: Meguiar's DA Technologies & MT300 Review

    LIQUIDS (COMPOUNDS/POLISHES)


    Meguiar’s has long been known as an innovator in the world of car care; perhaps most notably in the professional and enthusiast realm for their paint correction compounds and polishes. This started with the liquids originally formulated by founder Frank Meguiar Jr., and later by the talented team of chemists assembled by current CEO Barry Meguiar.


    Source: Meguiars.com

    One of the oldest still-in-production liquids on offer is M01 Medium Cut Cleaner, which dates to the 1940s-50s and features a form of diminishing abrasive sometimes referred to as a “Buffered Abrasive.” This same basic technology would remain in use into the mid-1980s and early 90s, when the line was expanded to include M02 Fine Cut Cleaner, M04 Heavy Cut Cleaner, and M09 Swirl Remover. Due in large part to the way the buffered abrasive set used in these products breaks down, they were primarily suitable for use with a rotary buffer (save for M09, which was commonly used by DA users early on due to the mild nature of its abrasives) which was the dominant tool available at the time. These products were not known to create a particularly refined finish via DA since the abrasives would not fully break down. Final polishing in this era was typically performed with one of Meguiars’ abrasive-free “pure polishes,” M03, M05, or M07 Show Car Glaze.


    Source: Meguiars.com

    In 1995-6, Meguiar’s introduced a line of products featuring an updated abrasive set with the trade name “Diminishing Abrasive Techonology,” or “DAT.” The compounds and polishes of the M8x line included standouts such as M80 Speed Glaze, M81 Hand Polish (discontinued), M82 Swirl Free Polish, M83 Dual Action Cleaner/Polish, M84 Compound Power Cleaner, and M85 Diamond Cut Compound. Due to the improved working properties of DAT, these products boasted an extended buffing cycle and better finishing characteristics to improve effective cutting capability and overall results. Although still primarily developed for rotary use, M80 and M83 in particular lent themselves handily to use with the newly emerging Dual Action polishers that had caught the attention of professionals and enthusiasts alike; a welcomed bonus which put Meguiar’s at the forefront of a march toward the adoption of DA paint correction as a standard for many technicians.


    Source: MeguiarsOnline.com

    DAT compounds and polishes remained popular until mid-way through the 21st Century’s first decade, when in 2006 Meguiar’s again shook up the detailing industry with the introduction of game-changing Super-Micro Abrasive Technology, or SMAT, to their new line of compounds and polishes. This initially came in the form of M86 Solo Cut & Polish Cream; part of a system designed for rotary use. Due to marketing targeted toward body shops and high volume operations, M86 never really received the recognition it deserved for ushering in a new era in machine polishing performance and efficiency.


    Source: Meguiars.com

    In 2007-08, SMAT finally gained mainstream attention when the now ubiquitous M105 and M205 were introduced. This current industry-standard pair of products are capable of producing efficient, beautiful results with much less time or effort than any previous offerings. Although these products were again primarily (initially) designed around rotary usage, they elevated the correction potential of Dual Action polishers to all new heights as a result of their consistent cutting and finishing capabilities.


    Source: MeguiarsOnline.com

    The SMAT-based products would prove to be so effective and versatile that SMAT was utilized as the foundation of the DA-specific Microfiber Correction System and its compound/wax products (D300/D301) released in 2011, followed in 2013 by D302 Polish. Notably, these products are designed for low to no dusting, and unlike the Mirror Glaze line are not body shop safe.


    Source: Meguiars.com

    Rounding out the current SMAT line are M101 Foam Cut Compound and M100 Pro Speed Compound, released in 2012 and 2014, respectively. As some may recall, M101 found particular notoriety in that it was originally developed and intended specifically for the European market, but consumer demand driven by “black market” importation caused Meguiar’s to release it in the US as well, where it remains popular among many advanced users. M100 is a close cousin to M101 with regard to its solvent formulation and abrasive set, and it delivers excellent performance at an affordable price. M100 has become my personal go-to compound since it tends to cut slightly faster than M105, and in many instances even finishes with greater clarity.
    Charlie
    Automotive Appearance Specialist - Serving Greater Lansing, Michigan

  3. #3
    CCH Auto Appearance, LLC C. Charles Hahn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Lansing, MI
    Posts
    85
    Rep Power
    7

    Re: Years-in-Review: Meguiar's DA Technologies & MT300 Review

    PADS AND BACKING PLATES



    Source: MeguiarsOnline.com

    For many decades after the birth of the automobile, the only buffing pads available for detailers were made from various forms of wool. Although wool is highly effective and efficient at material removal and cutting through surface defects with a rotary buffer, it is not very well suited to finishing swirl and haze free (nor is it particularly well suited to widespread DA use). The Meguiar’s solution to this problem first appeared in 1965 – a convoluted foam pad with a built-in backing plate, aptly named the “Wooless Wonder.”


    Source: MeguiarsMedia.com


    Source: Amazon.com

    Foam technology would continue to improve through the next two decades, and in the mid 1980s Meguiar’s began selling the original SoftBuff pad system, consisting of cutting, polishing, and finishing foams. These were initially available with built-in backing plates for both rotary and DA polishers, in 8” and 6.5” diameters. By the early 90s, these pads had been updated to include a hook-and-loop backing system for increased efficiency when changing pads, which also necessitated the release of the first separate backing plate(s) to pair with the system.


    Source: MeguiarsOnline.com

    For Dual Action polishers, this came in the form of the W64DA, intended for use with 6.5” pads. The W64DA consisted of a hard plastic backing layer, bonded to a dense foam interface that would allow pads to conform slightly to curved surfaces. Although functional, the interface foam tended to be very temperature sensitive and prone to warping during extended polishing sessions.


    Source: BuffDaddy.com

    In response to this problem, in 2007 Meguiar’s introduced the revised W67DA backing plate. Boasting the same diameter as its predecessor, the W67DA’s interface layer was made of a much different mold-injected foam that was somewhat more firm, and much less prone to warping.


    Source: BuffDaddy.com


    Source: MeguiarsOnline.com

    Two years later in 2009, Meguiar’s made another significant change with the release of the SoftBuff 2.0 pad system. Available exclusively in a 7” diameter, SB2.0 pads featured a recessed backing designed for easier and more consistent centering when used exclusively with the matching W68/W68DA backing plate. Although these pads represented a great step forward for rotary users, they would prove to be a step backward for DA use. The tools available at the time were simply underpowered to efficiently remove defects with them, given the larger diameter and heavier overall mass of the pad and plate system. Thankfully, the original SoftBuff pads and backing plates would continue to be available concurrently for DA users’ benefit.


    Source: BuffDaddy.com



    In 2010, Meguiar’s introduced two more components that signaled its development of a DA-centric paint correction lineup. First was the Unigrit DA sanding system, consisting of both sanding and finishing abrasive discs in 6” and 3” diameters, allowing for efficient defect removal and texture leveling by machine. These were accompanied by 4” SoftBuff foam pads, designed for spot correction of isolated defects as well as for headlight restoration.


    Source: MeguiarsOnline.com

    2011 was a banner year for Meguiar’s, and for all DA users, as it saw the debut of one of the most significant game changing technologies of the past several decades. Microfiber cutting and finishing discs have catapulted the concept of using a DA for serious paint correction to levels never before thought possible. In spite of some issues with the construction of the discs in early batches, Meguiar’s has managed to dominate the market since their release. The line was rounded out in 2013 with the addition of “Xtra Cut” discs. Microfiber discs are available in 3”, 5”, and 6” diameters.


    Source: Meguiars.com


    Source: Amazon.com

    That brings us back to the 2014 SEMA show, where Meguiar’s released its new thin profile foam discs (which are still carrying the SoftBuff name). Available in revised finishing, polishing, and cutting foams with diameters of 5” and 6” for DA, and 7” for rotary, these discs completely replace the original SoftBuff and SoftBuff 2.0 product lines. The flared 4” spot pads from 2010 were removed from the professional line, making them an exclusive consumer-line offering paired with the DA Power System. Along with the new foam discs, Meguiar’s also updated its line of DA backing plates, featuring additional rivets around the spindle for added stability and durability.



    Personally, I have been using the new foam discs (mainly in 5” size) almost exclusively since their release, and find that their performance is far superior to the previous pads in many ways. I do still maintain a stock of the original SoftBuff 6.5” pads for use in situations where a thicker pad with more cushioning is preferable, but with regard to residue management, ease of cleaning/drying, and power transfer from tool to working surface, the new pads are a definite top pick.
    Charlie
    Automotive Appearance Specialist - Serving Greater Lansing, Michigan

  4. #4
    CCH Auto Appearance, LLC C. Charles Hahn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Lansing, MI
    Posts
    85
    Rep Power
    7

    Re: Years-in-Review: Meguiar's DA Technologies & MT300 Review

    TOOLS - HISTORY



    Source: MeguiarsOnline.com

    The DA story at Meguiar’s begins in the early 1990s, when some members of the R&D team began experimenting with the Porter Cable electric sander, model 7424. Designed and built for use in the woodworking industry, these bulletproof American-made tools would become a fixture in the detailing industry for much of the next two decades. Meguiar’s began selling a private labeled version of the PC7424 under the part number G100/G100A, which was functionally and cosmetically identical to the PC. The G100(A)’s primary differentiators were the Meguiar’s branding, and that it was sold with a lifetime warranty.


    Source: Amazon.com

    For a brief period between 2001-04, Meguiar’s sold a second dual action polisher alongside the G100. Known as the G104, it was a battery operated polisher designed for ultimate portability and convenience. Unfortunately, short battery life and a lack of torque made this particular tool’s usefulness limited, and it was soon quietly discontinued.


    Source: MeguiarsOnline.com

    After Meguiar’s partnership with Porter Cable ended in 2007, the company was left to source a DA polisher elsewhere. Their solution was the G110, now made in China and carrying only a 1-year warranty. Unfortunately, the G110 was plagued with problems from the start. Numerous reports of failing power cords, bearing failures, and general build quality concerns earned the tool a less than stellar reputation.


    Source: Amazon.com

    As a side note, Porter Cable released the 7424XP, or PCXP, in 2009. Production was moved to Mexico, and subsequently to China.


    Source: MeguiarsOnline.com

    Recognizing the desperate need for improvement, Meguiar’s got back to work, and the G110v2 debuted in 2010. Although very similar physically to the original G110, updates included more easily user replaceable carbon brushes, an improved cord, and an analog “cruise control” circuit designed to detect load on the motor and increase torque output to maintain pad rotation. These improvements would prove to largely redeem the issues of the original G110.


    Source: MeguiarsOnline.com

    On the “consumer” side of the market, Meguiar’s in 2013 introduced the DA Power System – a small, drill attachable, forced rotation DA polisher marketed through mainstream retail channels and intended for beginners and those on a limited budget. Since this tool is exclusively usable with 3-4” pads, it is somewhat impractical for use on an entire vehicle, but serves its purpose quite well for spot polishing. I’ve even used it attached to a drill press for stationary polishing, as shown in the video below.

    Charlie
    Automotive Appearance Specialist - Serving Greater Lansing, Michigan

  5. #5
    CCH Auto Appearance, LLC C. Charles Hahn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Lansing, MI
    Posts
    85
    Rep Power
    7

    Re: Years-in-Review: Meguiar's DA Technologies & MT300 Review

    MT300 OVERVIEW



    The introduction of the MT300 at the 2014 SEMA show came at an interesting time in the evolution of the industry’s tools of choice. With many serious enthusiasts and professionals adopting tools like the forced rotation Flex 3401 DA or the large-stroke Rupes Bigfoot family of polishers, many expected Meguiar’s to follow suit with a taller-stroke machine. Instead, this “clean sheet” design retained the same 5/16” (8mm) orbit size as its elder siblings.

    So, given that the MT300 is functionally near-identical to its predecessors, what has actually changed?



    The first and most obvious change is to the form factor of the tool. Traditionally, standard DA polishers such as the PC and G110v2 have used the armature body of the tool as a “barrel grip,” accompanied by a rocker switch for turning the tool on and off. The MT300 ditches this format in favor of a more rotary-like handle grip at the rear of the tool, and a trigger-and-lock arrangement to control power. This layout is intended to provide a more balanced feel for the operator, reducing fatigue during long polishing sessions.



    In addition to the form factor change, internal upgrades such as a new billet counterweight, triple bearing shaft, a soft start feature, and a switch from analog cruise control to “Digital Torque Management” are said to improve usability as well.

    MT300 REVIEW




    The choice to stick with an 8mm stroke length for the MT300 would seem to be a risky move given the general trend toward tall-stroke DAs like the Rupes Bigfoot over the last 4-5 years. These machines have gained traction with professionals and serious enthusiasts for very good reason – they produce incredible results in a highly efficient manner, and they are designed with features catering to specific needs. However, the cost of entry for these machines is significantly higher than more traditional DAs, and they lack the sort of versatility the common 8mm tools are famous for as well.



    A shorter stroke tool is typically more effective for edge work, and can be used with multiple sizes of pads and backing plates. This makes them ideal for casual hobbyists, the beginner on a budget, the mobile detailer with limited space or desire to carry multiple tools, or detailers who don’t have access to an air supply for pneumatic tools. With a Rupes 21, for example, you’re limited to 5” or 6” backing plates; in order to use 3” pads you must purchase an entirely separate tool (the Bigfoot Mini), and 1”-2” pads require either customized air tools or the upcoming iBrid Nano system. The MT300 is able to accommodate that entire range of backing plate and pad sizes, making it a suitable and affordable single tool solution for those so inclined.



    “Rotary-style” tools do tend to provide noticeably more comfortable balance than barrel-grip tools during extended use, and that is certainly the case here… however the MT300’s implementation of this format also has some slight flaws.



    For example, the design of the rear handle curves downward toward the work surface to such an extent that it puts the power cord very low at the back of the body, increasing the chances of it contacting the work surface. One of the reasons for this is the selection of a strain relief boot that allows it to bend downward behind the tool. The G110v2 by contrast used a gusseted rubber boot that directed the cord up and away from the work surface, giving the user much more confidence and making it one less thing to think about while working.



    The trigger and lock mechanism is another point of contention for me. With the form factor change came an opportunity to implement a variable speed trigger for even greater control while working in tight areas or on edges. Instead, the MT300 comes equipped with a very stiff momentary switch trigger, along with a rear trigger guard that has turned out to be a periodic pinch hazard.



    Further, the trigger lock control has proven less than confidence inspiring. The button itself is smaller in diameter than other similar tools, and its “engaged” position leaves it recessed into a deep indent in the side of the handle rather than flush to the tool body. In practice, this design makes it sometimes difficult to tell by feel alone if the lock has fully engaged (occasionally causing it to not fully engage, and the tool to shut off), requiring the user to pay special attention instead of performing what should be a totally intuitive motion.



    As to the internal changes, the MT300 makes some welcome improvements. The new triple bearing design and billet counterweight do make the tool much smoother than its predecessors; another factor that helps during long polishing sessions. Also, the counterweight design makes changing backing plates more efficient than ever before (an advantage for those relying on the MT300 as a single-tool solution).



    The rotating assembly on the PC/XP (G100), G110/v2, and other similar tools left only one side of the spindle nut accessible at any given time; the indexing of this open side constantly changes each time the tool runs. When changing out backing plates, this meant that the operator had to determine where they could insert the spindle wrench, and/or re-index the oscillating mechanism manually. On the MT300, however, the spindle nut is fully accessible from all sides at all times, making it easy to insert the wrench without looking or fumbling around. While this may only shave a few seconds off each plate change, on a job where you’re potentially changing plates multiple times that savings can really add up.


    Source: Meguiars/YouTube.com

    Unfortunately, the same cannot be said of the soft start feature. While the idea is to avoid the “grab” of instant-on torque (especially when a higher speed is selected on the dial), the implementation in the MT300 can be a bit too slow to start, at least for my liking. Had a variable speed potentiometer been fitted to the trigger instead of a basic on-off switch, the need for soft start would be greatly reduced, if not eliminated as the operator would have the ability to feather the throttle at their own pace.



    One of the headlining changes to the MT300 was the introduction of Digital Torque Management as a replacement for the analog cruise control featured on the G110v2. The cruise control was effective at maintaining pad rotation under pressure, but it was sometimes slow to respond to input. DTM, on the other hand, is noticeably more responsive and precise at delivering necessary torque, providing consistent rotation for a predictable level of cut and finish.

    CONCLUSIONS


    In spite of a few minor gripes, the new MT300 has earned a worthy place in my tool arsenal; for its price point and feature set it is a compelling package that meets needs I feel are essential in any detailer’s bag of tricks, from beginner to professional. Especially when paired with the current crop of backing plates, pads, and liquids (for which it was designed) it truly does outperform its predecessors.

    Beginners with little to no polishing experience will find themselves able to put the MT300 to use with very little instruction, and experienced users should immediately notice and appreciate the improvements between this and other similar tools they’ve used previously. If you are in the market for a new general purpose DA polisher, I’d definitely suggest putting this one on your short list.

    Thank you all for reading; I hope you’ve enjoyed this history lesson and review!
    Charlie
    Automotive Appearance Specialist - Serving Greater Lansing, Michigan

  6. #6
    Sr. Global Product & Training Spec Michael Stoops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Irvine, CA
    Posts
    21,401
    Rep Power
    1138

    Re: Years-in-Review: Meguiar's DA Technologies & MT300 Review

    Charlie, we hardly know what to say - "thank you" seems insufficient given the time and effort that you put into this article as it really is pretty dang awesome!!

    For those of you who don't know Charlie, he's quite the accomplished detailer out of Lansing, MI. He's taken both sessions of the NXT Program with us and impressed myself, Jason Rose and Kevin Brown so much that we invited him to assist us with the most recent session last fall in Maryland. He was a fantastic asset to the team and an enormous help in terms of both the grunt work of set up and tear down, but more importantly in guiding the students through the various processes discussed in the classroom portion when they finally put buffer to paint.

    Thanks again, Charlie - you rock, my friend!
    Michael Stoops
    Senior Global Product & Training Specialist | Meguiar's Inc.

    Remember, this hobby is supposed to be your therapy, not the reason you need therapy.

  7. #7
    Registered Member Priyaka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Franklin Lakes NJ
    Posts
    26
    Rep Power
    4

    Re: Years-in-Review: Meguiar's DA Technologies & MT300 Review

    Lovely article. This is definitely a must read for all fans of Meguiar products. Thank you so much for sharing. It is great to learn the history behind the current products.
    Yeah we all shine on, like the moon, and the stars, and the sun - John Lennon

  8. #8
    Michael The Guz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Lawndale, CA
    Age
    40
    Posts
    5,444
    Rep Power
    63

    Re: Years-in-Review: Meguiar's DA Technologies & MT300 Review

    Great write up.

    I own the MT300 as well. I agree with some of your findings in regards to the trigger lock button and the soft start. I own a Rupes LHR15 Mark II and the locking trigger is smoother in it's operation and I like that it sits more flush to the body. Same can be said for the soft start of the Rupes. For me the soft start on the MT300 is more crude or violent, not sure if it's the right term to use. But it doesn't feel as smooth as the Rupes.

    I also have a love hate with the MT300 because the power cord has failed on it twice. I'm hoping this last fix is as permanent as can be. I don't like the boot for the power cord. I find it to be a little to stiff and there is a lot of strain based on the position of the handle and the angle of the boot and also with the cord over ones shoulder.

    I do like the power that the MT300 offers. It has plenty of power for curved surfaces and the digital torque works rather well just as you stated. It does have more vibration than the Rupes I can say that much. But the MT300 has less vibration than a Porter Cable 7424XP. The ergonomics are better than a PC style DA.

    I'm a big fan of the thin foam disks. They work very well with many of the SMAT compounds and polishes. They also work very well with the MT300.

    Overall the MT300 is a nice tool but for me I am skeptical on the reliability based on the two power cord failures I have experienced with very little use. I think the features can be tweaked just a bit to make this an even better tool. I completely agree that if someone is looking for a single tool approach then this would be one tool to consider.

  9. #9
    Mr Sparkle davey g-force's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    4,290
    Rep Power
    64

    Re: Years-in-Review: Meguiar's DA Technologies & MT300 Review

    Wow, great article Charlie!

    I had never even heard of the G104 polisher! You learn something new every day
    Quote Originally Posted by Blueline View Post
    I own a silver vehicle and a black vehicle owns me. The black one demands attention, washing, detailing, waxing and an occasional dinner out at a nice restaurant. The silver one demands nothing and it looks just fine. I think the black vehicle is taking advantage of me, and the silver car is more my style. We can go out for a drive without her makeup and she looks fine. If I want to take the black one out, it is three or four hours in the "bathroom" to get ready.

  10. #10
    CCH Auto Appearance, LLC C. Charles Hahn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Lansing, MI
    Posts
    85
    Rep Power
    7

    Re: Years-in-Review: Meguiar's DA Technologies & MT300 Review

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Stoops View Post
    Charlie, we hardly know what to say - "thank you" seems insufficient given the time and effort that you put into this article as it really is pretty dang awesome!!

    For those of you who don't know Charlie, he's quite the accomplished detailer out of Lansing, MI. He's taken both sessions of the NXT Program with us and impressed myself, Jason Rose and Kevin Brown so much that we invited him to assist us with the most recent session last fall in Maryland. He was a fantastic asset to the team and an enormous help in terms of both the grunt work of set up and tear down, but more importantly in guiding the students through the various processes discussed in the classroom portion when they finally put buffer to paint.

    Thanks again, Charlie - you rock, my friend!
    Thank you for the very kind words, Mike; it was my pleasure to put this together, and even moreso a pleasure to work with everyone in Maryland. I hope to be able to be involved with the next NXT as well, whenever or wherever it may be.

    Quote Originally Posted by Priyaka View Post
    Lovely article. This is definitely a must read for all fans of Meguiar products. Thank you so much for sharing. It is great to learn the history behind the current products.
    Thanks, Priyaka!

    Quote Originally Posted by The Guz View Post
    Great write up.

    I own the MT300 as well. I agree with some of your findings in regards to the trigger lock button and the soft start. I own a Rupes LHR15 Mark II and the locking trigger is smoother in it's operation and I like that it sits more flush to the body. Same can be said for the soft start of the Rupes. For me the soft start on the MT300 is more crude or violent, not sure if it's the right term to use. But it doesn't feel as smooth as the Rupes.

    I also have a love hate with the MT300 because the power cord has failed on it twice. I'm hoping this last fix is as permanent as can be. I don't like the boot for the power cord. I find it to be a little to stiff and there is a lot of strain based on the position of the handle and the angle of the boot and also with the cord over ones shoulder.

    I do like the power that the MT300 offers. It has plenty of power for curved surfaces and the digital torque works rather well just as you stated. It does have more vibration than the Rupes I can say that much. But the MT300 has less vibration than a Porter Cable 7424XP. The ergonomics are better than a PC style DA.

    I'm a big fan of the thin foam disks. They work very well with many of the SMAT compounds and polishes. They also work very well with the MT300.

    Overall the MT300 is a nice tool but for me I am skeptical on the reliability based on the two power cord failures I have experienced with very little use. I think the features can be tweaked just a bit to make this an even better tool. I completely agree that if someone is looking for a single tool approach then this would be one tool to consider.
    Thank you! Sorry to hear that about the cord on your MT300 failing twice; I hope that you are able to resolve that issue long term.

    I haven't yet had my hands on a Rupes Mark II, but if they still behave like my LHR21 Mark I my sentiments would be the same regarding the soft start, it isn't obtrusive enough to mention.

    My feelings are like yours, I think an eventual MT300v2 with a few minor tweaks would solve most if not all of these issues, should the decision be made to pursue updates. They certainly have a great starting point!

    Quote Originally Posted by davey g-force View Post
    Wow, great article Charlie!

    I had never even heard of the G104 polisher! You learn something new every day
    Thanks Davey! I'm not sure how many of them were actually sold, or in what markets, but here's an excerpt from a 2003 catalog with a bit more information on the G104:

    Charlie
    Automotive Appearance Specialist - Serving Greater Lansing, Michigan

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Meguiar's PlastX Review
    By therdrman in forum Detailing 101
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: Jan 11th, 2011, 03:09 PM
  2. Meguiar's NXT Tech Wax 2.0 Review
    By therdrman in forum Detailing 101
    Replies: 41
    Last Post: Jan 7th, 2011, 10:22 PM
  3. Meguiar's All Metal Polish Review
    By therdrman in forum Detailing 101
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Nov 16th, 2010, 03:06 PM
  4. Meguiar's #21 Synthetic Sealant Review
    By slippysmit in forum Professional Line - Product Reviews
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: Apr 1st, 2005, 11:37 PM
  5. Meguiar's Hyper Dressing Review
    By GSRstilez in forum Professional Line - Product Reviews
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: Oct 3rd, 2004, 04:41 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •