Why do we need HEAT!!
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  1. #1
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    Why do we need HEAT!!

    I'm just wondering, when we want to polish a swirly car why we have to set the rotary speed to 1700 rpm? Do the heat fix the problem or the number of passes that we make on specific area?

    Thanks

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    Registered Member Mike Phillips's Avatar
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    Re: Why do we need HEAT!!

    Originally posted by v12
    I'm just wondering, when we want to polish a swirly car why we have to set the rotary speed to 1700 rpm? Do the heat fix the problem or the number of passes that we make on specific area?

    Thanks
    Who says you have to use the rotary at 1700rpm? We list using the rotary buffer in a range from 1000 to 2000 but that's up to the operator, it's not a concrete rule of thumb.

    I've never read anything by Meguiar's, nor have I ever posted that stated heat was a necessary component of machine buffing. It's definitely a by-product, but not a built-in feature.

    Removing defects, or in other words removing paint is a matter of the combination of pad selection, product selection and time and energy. Heat is generated and may be part of the process but it's a by-product of the process that cannot be avoided until you figure out a way to do something like inject the process with cold running water. Of course this would mean using an air-powered machine and not an electrical powered machine.
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    Re: Re: Why do we need HEAT!!

    Originally posted by Mike Phillips
    ...inject the process with cold running water. Of course this would mean using an air-powered machine and not an electrical powered machine.

    The stone industry does wet polishing with electric machines; they do need to be double insulated and have ground fault circuit interrupters.

    The machine may be similar to a rotary paint polisher but the actual process is different. The abrasives used are grinding wheels and a constant flow of water is used for cooling and lubrication. In paint polishing the product (compound, polish, cleaner, etc.) has the abrasive suspended in a slurry which is held against the finish by the pad. A flow of coolant would wash away the abrasive before they could do anything.

    Manufacturing operations like lens grinding are done with continuous flow abrasive slurries. Those processes recirculate the abrasive liquid (unless you want to waste humongous volumes of expensive abrasives).


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    Last edited by the other pc; Sep 3rd, 2005 at 08:52 PM.

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    Thanks all for your reply,

    Mike, actually I heard this in meguiar video tape! he said as I remember that if you use very high speed you may burn the paint and if you use too low speed it will not generate sufficient heat to fix the problem. and he recommend using the rotary ar speed of 1750rpm.

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    Registered Member Mike Phillips's Avatar
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    Originally posted by v12
    Thanks all for your reply,

    Mike, actually I heard this in Meguiar's video tape! he said as I remember that if you use very high speed you may burn the paint and if you use too low speed it will not generate sufficient heat to fix the problem. and he recommend using the rotary ar speed of 1750rpm.
    I'll look into that as I don't remember the video saying that and I wrote the script.

    For the most part, the only time I know of where high speeds are useful and necessary are when a person is working on polyester or epoxy molds, in cases like this you're not working on a thin layer of paint, but on a thick layer of a hard substance.

    Always remember paint is thin, even if you have extra coats, compared to the cutting ability of a cutting pad, a cutting compound and rotary buffer, paint is thin.

    I'll read through the script and see what I can find. It could be that I'm wrong and heat is a necessary component of the cutting process, it won't be the first time I've made a mistake and it certainly will not be the last time.
    Mike Phillips
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    Registered Member probegt's Avatar
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    So if the there was no heat , would the diminishing abrasives would still break down?

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    Registered Member Mike Phillips's Avatar
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    Originally posted by probegt
    So if the there was no heat , would the diminishing abrasives would still break down?

    Heat is not a necessary component of the cleaning process when using any of Meguiar's compounds, paint cleaners, cleaner/polishes or cleaners/waxes.

    Heat is merely an unavoidable by-product of the process.


    The answer to your question is "Yes".


    All that is required to break the diminishing abrasives utilized by Meguiar's products is pressure over time.
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    Registered Member probegt's Avatar
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    Thanks. Thats what I figured but I hear alot that products will not break down properly without heat. Do you think it might help aid in it?

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    In most cases heat is more of a problem then a solution when working on thin, delicate coatings. So the answer would be no.
    Mike Phillips
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    perpetual noob Mosca's Avatar
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    OK, then that begs the question: Why can't #84 and #85, and #s1/2/4 be used effectively with the G100? My understanding as well was that they required the heat of the rotary.
    As the light changed from red to green to yellow and back to red again, I sat there thinking about life. Was it nothing more than a bunch of honking and yelling? Sometimes it seemed that way.

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